USS Amphion (ID-1888)

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For other ships with the same name, see USS Amphion.
USS Amphion
USS Amphion
History
United States
Launched: 1899 (as Köln)
Commissioned: 12 April 1919 (as USS Amphion)
Decommissioned: 27 September 1919
Renamed: 1917
Fate: Sold for scrap, 1924
General characteristics
Displacement: 18,000 tons
Length: 447 ft (136 m)
Beam: 54 ft 3 in (16.54 m)
Draught: 30 ft (9.1 m)
Speed: 12 kts.
Complement: 85

The first USS Amphion was a former German passenger liner SS Köln for Norddeutscher Lloyd that later served as a troop transport for the United States Expeditionary Force during World War I.

Amphion began her life as a passenger liner based at Geestemunde, Germany, in 1899. When World War I broke out in August 1914, Köln was interned by the United States Government. When the United States entered the war in April 1917, Köln was seized, placed in service as the United States Army Transport Amphion, and used by the United States Army as a troopship to move the American Expeditionary Force to France.

Durng one of these voyages, the German submarine SM U-155 attacked Amphion with gunfire in the Atlantic Ocean at 36°06′N 62°59′W / 36.100°N 62.983°W / 36.100; -62.983 on 12 October 1918. Two of Amphion′s crew were killed[1] and six wounded. Amphion survived the engagement, which was followed by a lengthy stay in port.

World War I ended on 11 November 1918. With the war over, Amphion was transferred to and commissioned by the United States Navy as USS Amphion (ID Number 1888) in April 1919. Between 21 May and 3 September 1919, USS Amphion journeyed thrice to France – twice to St. Nazaire and once to Brest – bringing home 6,410 American troops.

Decommissioned at Brooklyn, New York, on 27 September 1919, Amphion was turned over to the United States Shipping Board (USSB) for disposition; and her name was simultaneously stricken from the Naval list. In January 1924, the USSB sold her for scrapping.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Amphion". Uboat.net. Retrieved 27 October 2012. 

External links[edit]