USS Clytie (AS-26)

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USS Clytie exiting Fremantle Harbour 1944
USS Clytie (AS-26), exiting Fremantle Harbour, Australia, September 1945.
History
United States
Name: Clytie
Namesake: Clytie
Ordered: as type (C3-S-A2) hull, MC hull 861
Builder: Ingalls Shipbuilding, Pascagoula, Mississippi
Launched: 26 November 1943
Acquired: 26 February 1944
Commissioned: 26 February 1944 (reduced commission)
Decommissioned: 3 April 1944
Commissioned: 18 January 1945 (full commission)
Decommissioned: 5 October 1946
Identification:
Fate: scrapped in 1971
General characteristics
Class and type: Aegir-class submarine tender
Displacement: 16,500 long tons (16,800 t) (full)
Length: 492 ft 6 in (150.11 m)
Beam: 69 ft 6 in (21.18 m)
Draft: 27 ft (8.2 m)
Installed power:
Propulsion:
Speed: 18.4 kn (34.1 km/h; 21.2 mph)
Complement: 82 Officers 1,378 Enlisted
Armament:

USS Clytie (AS-26) was an Aegir-class submarine tender in the United States Navy during World War II.

Construction[edit]

Clytie was launched 26 November 1943 by Ingalls Shipbuilding in Pascagoula, Mississippi, under a Maritime Commission contract, MC hull 861. Clytie was sponsored by Mrs. C. H. Leavitt; and transferred to the Navy 26 February 1944, and placed in temporary commission for passage to her conversion yard, Bethlehem Steel Corporation, Hoboken, New Jersey. Clytie was placed in full commission 18 January 1945 with Commander C. H. Walker in command.[1]

Service history[edit]

Clytie sailed from New London 21 February 1945 for Brisbane, and Fremantle submarine base, Western Australia, where she tended submarines of the 7th Fleet from 4 April to 13 September. Returning to New London 17 October, Clytie remained there except for a brief overhaul at Philadelphia until placed out of commission in reserve 5 October 1946.[1]

Notes[edit]

Citations
  1. ^ a b DANFS.

Bibliography[edit]

Online resources* "Clytie (AS-26)". Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships. Navy Department, Naval History & Heritage Command. Retrieved 8 November 2016.  This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.

External links[edit]