USS Mingoe (1863)

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History
United States
Name: Mingoe
Builder: D. S. Mershon
Cost: $157,000
Laid down: 1862
Launched: 6 August 1863
Commissioned: 29 July 1864
Out of service: 1865
Struck: 1865 (est.)
Fate: sold, 3 October 1867
General characteristics
Displacement: 974 tons
Length: 205 ft (62 m)
Beam: 35 ft (11 m)
Draft: 6 ft 5 in (1.96 m)
Propulsion:
Sail plan: Schooner
Speed: 11 knots
Complement: 163/200
Armament:
  • two 100-pounder guns
  • two 24-pounder guns
  • two 20-pounder guns
  • one heavy 12-pounder gun
  • one 12-pounder gun
Armor: iron clad above waterline

USS Mingoe (1863) was a large double-ended, side wheel, ironclad [1] steamer gunboat purchased by the Union Navy during the American Civil War. With her heavy guns and a very fast speed of 11 kn (13 mph; 20 km/h) she was planned by the Union Navy for use as a bombardment gunboat, but also as an interceptor gunboat stationed off Confederate waterways to prevent their trading with foreign countries.

Constructed in Bordentown, New Jersey[edit]

An ironclad, side wheel, steam gunboat, with schooner rigging Mingoe was built under contract with Daniel S. Mershon, Jr. at Bordentown, New Jersey.[2] She was laid down 1862.[3] She was based on the same plans as Sassacus.She was reported as under construction in Bordentown, New Jersey by the Navy Department on October 15, 1862.[4] By January 31, 1863 the keel had been laid.[5] The ship's armor consisted of iron cladding the sides above the water sufficiently to protect the men on deck.[6] By May 29, 1863 she was so far along in construction it was predicted that she would be launched on June 10th.[7] She was launched 6 August 1863, and commissioned 29 July 1864 at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Comdr. J. B. Creighton in command.

Civil War service[edit]

Mingoe joined the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron on 13 August 1864 and performed blockade duty in the St. Johns River and off Charleston, South Carolina, until the end of the year. In February 1865, she assisted William Tecumseh Sherman’s Army in its advance up the James River.

Commanding Officers

Johnston Blakely Creighton (J.B. Creighton) [8] [9] [10]

S.P. Quakenbush [11] as of June 1, 1865

Post-war service and disposal[edit]

After the end of the conflict, Mingoe returned to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and laid up at League Island until sold 3 October 1867.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "THE BLOCKADING SERVICE.; Arrival of the Supply Steamer Union--Capture of a Prize. Naval. OUR IRON-CLAD FLEET. Alleged Rebel Project for the Reinvasion of Maryland and Pennsylvania". New York Times. May 22, 1863. Retrieved September 22, 2016.
  2. ^ United States (1921). Official Records of the Union and Confederate Navies in the War of the Rebellion. United States Naval War Records Office Government Printing Office. p. 145.
  3. ^ Silverstone, Paul (2006). Civil War Navies, 1855-1883. Routledge. pp. 38–39.
  4. ^ Childs, George (1863). The National Almanac and Annual Record for the Year 1863-64. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: George W. Childs. p. 115. Retrieved September 23, 2016.
  5. ^ "Naval Affairs.; LAUNCH OF A MAN-OF-WAR DESCRIPTION OF THE VESSEL THE FLEET TO WHICH IT BELONGS". New York Times. January 31, 1863. Retrieved September 23, 2016.
  6. ^ "Naval Affairs.; LAUNCH OF A MAN-OF-WAR DESCRIPTION OF THE VESSEL THE FLEET TO WHICH IT BELONGS". New York Times. January 31, 1863. Retrieved September 23, 2016.
  7. ^ "LOCAL INTELLIGENCE.; Naval. CHIEF-ENGINEER STIMERS IN TROUBLE". New York Times. May 29, 1863. Retrieved September 26, 2016.
  8. ^ Congressional Serial Set. U.S. Government Printing Office. 1903. p. 31.
  9. ^ https://www.green-wood.com/2015/civil-war-biographies-corson-culbert/
  10. ^ https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/5038
  11. ^ Congressional Serial Set. U.S. Government Printing Office. 1903. p. 341.