Ughtred Kay-Shuttleworth, 1st Baron Shuttleworth

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The Right Honourable
The Lord Shuttleworth
PC
Sir Ughtred Kay-Shuttleworth.jpg
Under-Secretary of State for India
In office
7 February 1886 – 12 April 1886
Monarch Victoria
Prime Minister William Ewart Gladstone
Preceded by The Lord Harris
Succeeded by Stafford Howard
Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
In office
16 April 1886 – 20 July 1886
Monarch Victoria
Prime Minister William Ewart Gladstone
Preceded by Edward Heneage
Succeeded by The Viscount Cranbrook
Parliamentary and Financial Secretary to the Admiralty
In office
19 August 1892 – 21 June 1895
Monarch Victoria
Prime Minister William Ewart Gladstone
The Earl of Rosebery
Preceded by Arthur Forwood
Succeeded by William Ellison-Macartney
Personal details
Born 18 December 1844 (1844-12-18)
Died 20 December 1939 (1939-12-21)
Nationality British
Political party Liberal
Spouse(s) Blanche Parish (d. 1924)
Caricature by Spy (Leslie Ward) in Vanity Fair, August 1904

Ughtred James Kay-Shuttleworth, 1st Baron Shuttleworth PC (18 December 1844 – 20 December 1939), known as Sir Ughtred Kay-Shuttleworth, Bt, between 1872 and 1902, was a British landowner and Liberal politician. He was Under-Secretary of State for India and Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster under William Ewart Gladstone in 1886 and Parliamentary and Financial Secretary to the Admiralty under Gladstone and Lord Rosebery between 1892 and 1895.

Background[edit]

Shuttleworth was the son of the physician, civil servant and social reformer Sir James Kay-Shuttle-worth, 1st Baronet, the member of the Famous textile Kay family of Bury Lancshire, Great Grand father John Kay inventor of the "Flying Shuttle" and Great Uncle Robert Kay inventor of the "Drop Box" His father, born James Kay, had assumed the additional surname of Shuttleworth on his marriage to Janet Shuttleworth, only child and heiress of Robert Shuttleworth, of Gawthorpe Hall in Padiham, Lancashire. His father's brothers included the economist Joseph Kay and the Lord Justice of Appeal Sir Edward Kay.

The Shuttleworth family had been landowners in Lancashire from medieval times. Tradition states they made their fortune from wool weaving. They supported the parliamentary side in the English Civil War. Sir James and Lady Shuttleworth parted company after five children and Shuttleworth was raised largely apart from his father. For some years in his youth he lived in Germany with his mother. On her death, in 1872, he inherited large estates, including Gawthorpe Hall. His father then relocated to another of the estates, in Westmorland.[citation needed]

Political career[edit]

Shuttleworth was returned to parliament for Hastings in 1869, a seat he held until 1880.[1] He remained out of parliament until 1885, when he was elected for the Clitheroe division of Lancashire, a constituency he continued to represent until his elevation to the peerage in 1902.[2] When the Liberals came to power under William Ewart Gladstone in February 1886, Shuttleworth was made Under-Secretary of State for India.[citation needed] Already in April he became Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster, replacing Edward Heneage, who had resigned over Irish Home Rule.[3] He was sworn of the Privy Council at the same time.[4] He remained Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster until the Liberals fell from power in July 1886.[3]

Shuttleworth returned to office under Gladstone in 1892 when he was made Parliamentary and Financial Secretary to the Admiralty, a post he held until 1895, the last year under the premiership of Lord Rosebery.[citation needed] In 1902 he was raised to the peerage as Baron Shuttleworth, of Gawthorpe in the County Palatine of Lancaster.[5] From 1908 to 1928 he was Lord Lieutenant of Lancashire,[3] in which capacity in 1910 he entertained King George V and Queen Mary at Gawthorpe Hall.[citation needed]

Family[edit]

Lord Shuttleworth married Blanche Marion, daughter of Sir Woodbine Parish, in 1871. They had two sons and four daughters. Both his sons, Captain the Hon. Lawrence Ughtred Kay-Shuttleworth (1887–1917) and T/Captain the Hon. Edward James Kay-Shuttleworth (1890–1917) were killed in the First World War. Lady Shuttleworth died in June 1924. Lord Shuttleworth survived her by fifteen years and died in December 1939, aged 95. He was succeeded in his titles by his grandson, Richard, the eldest son of the Hon. Lawrence Kay-Shuttleworth. Richard was killed during the Battle of Britain only eight months later,[6] when his Hawker Hurricane went missing during a battle over a Channel convoy, south of the Isle of Wight.[7] His younger brother, Ronald, the third Baron, was killed in North Africa in 1942. The barony passed to Ronald's first cousin, Charles, the fourth Baron Shuttleworth.[6] He was badly injured in the Second World War, losing one leg and the use of the other. He moved to another home, Leck Hall at Leck, Lancashire, on his estates, which was more convenient to his disability, leaving Gawthorpe Hall to his aunt, Rachel, who lived on at Gawthorpe Hall until her death in 1967. The estate became a National Trust property in 1970.[8]

Works[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]

Parliament of the United Kingdom
Preceded by
Frederick North
Thomas Brassey
Member of Parliament for Hastings
1869–1880
With: Thomas Brassey
Succeeded by
Charles James Murray
Thomas Brassey
Preceded by
Richard Fort
Member of Parliament for Clitheroe
1885–1902
Succeeded by
David Shackleton
Political offices
Preceded by
The Lord Harris
Under-Secretary of State for India
1886
Succeeded by
Stafford Howard
Preceded by
Edward Heneage
Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
1886
Succeeded by
The Viscount Cranbrook
Preceded by
Arthur Forwood
Parliamentary and Financial Secretary to the Admiralty
1892–1895
Succeeded by
William Ellison-Macartney
Honorary titles
Preceded by
The Earl of Derby
Lord Lieutenant of Lancashire
1908–1928
Succeeded by
The Earl of Derby
Baronetage of the United Kingdom
Preceded by
James Phillips Kay-Shuttleworth
Baronet
(of Gawthorpe Hall)
1877–1939
Succeeded by
Richard Kay-Shuttleworth
Peerage of the United Kingdom
New creation Baron Shuttleworth
1902–1939
Succeeded by
Richard Kay-Shuttleworth