Ukraine national football team

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This article is about the men's team. For the women's team, see Ukraine women's national football team.
Ukraine
Shirt badge/Association crest
Nickname(s) The Team (Збірна)
Yellow-Blue (Жовто-Сині)
Association Football Federation of Ukraine (FFU)
Федерація Футболу України
Confederation UEFA (Europe)
Head coach Mykhaylo Fomenko
Captain Anatoliy Tymoshchuk
Most caps Anatoliy Tymoshchuk (140)
Top scorer Andriy Shevchenko (48)
Home stadium Olimpiyskiy Stadium, Kyiv
FIFA code UKR
FIFA ranking 27 Increase 8 (9 July 2015)
Highest FIFA ranking 11 (February 2007)
Lowest FIFA ranking 132 (September 1993)
Elo ranking 20 (6 July 2015)
Highest Elo ranking 14 (November 2010)
Lowest Elo ranking 69 (29 March 1995)
First colours
Second colours
First international
 Ukraine 1–3 Hungary 
(Uzhhorod, Ukraine; 29 April 1992)
Biggest win
 Ukraine 9–0 San Marino 
(Lviv, Ukraine; 6 September 2013)
Biggest defeat
 Croatia 4–0 Ukraine 
(Zagreb, Croatia; 25 March 1995)
 Spain 4–0 Ukraine 
(Leipzig, Germany; 14 June 2006)
 Czech Republic 4–0 Ukraine 
(Prague, Czech Republic; 6 September 2011)
World Cup
Appearances 1 (First in 2006)
Best result Quarter-finals (2006)
European Championship
Appearances 1 (First in 2012)
Best result Group stage (2012)

The Ukraine national football team (Ukrainian: Збірна України з футболу) is the national football team of Ukraine and is controlled by the Football Federation of Ukraine. After Ukrainian Independence and the country's breakaway from the Soviet Union, they played their first match against Hungary on 29 April 1992. The team's biggest success on the world stage was reaching the quarter finals in the 2006 FIFA World Cup, which also marked the team's début in the finals of a major championship.[1] As the host nation, Ukraine automatically qualified for Euro 2012.[1]

Ukraine's home ground is the Olimpiyskiy Stadium in Kyiv.[2]

History[edit]

Pre-independence (1925–1935)[edit]

Officially the national team of Ukraine, it was formed in the early 1990s and shortly after was recognized internationally. It is not widely known, however, that Ukraine previously had a national team in 1925–1935.[3][4] Just like the RSFSR, the Ukrainian Socialist Soviet Republic had its own national team.

The earliest record of games it played can be traced back to August 1928. A championship among the national teams of the Soviet republics as well as the Moscow city team was planned to take place in Moscow. Just before the tournament started, the Ukrainian national team played two exhibition games against the Red Sports Federation team from Uruguay, one in Kharkiv (lost 1–2) and the other in Moscow (won 3–2). At the All-Soviet tournament, Ukraine played three games and reached the final where it lost to Moscow 0–1. Along the way, Ukraine managed to defeat the national teams of Belarus and Transcaucasus.

In 1929, Ukraine beat the team of Lower Austria in an exhibition match in Kharkiv, recording a score of 4–1.

In 1931, Ukraine participated in another All-Soviet championship in Moscow. It played only one game, starting from the semifinals. Ukraine lost to the national team of Transcaucasus 0–3 and was eliminated.

Official formation[edit]

Prior to Independence in 1991, Ukrainian players represented the Soviet Union national football team. After independence a Ukrainian national team was formed but the Football Federation of Ukraine failed to secure recognition in time to compete in the 1994 FIFA World Cup qualification.[5] Meanwhile, some of the best Ukrainian players of the beginning of the 1990s (including Andrei Kanchelskis, Viktor Onopko, Sergei Yuran, Yuri Nikiforov, Ilya Tsymbalar and Oleg Salenko) chose to play for Russia, as it was named the official successor of the Soviet Union.

The Soviet Union's five-year UEFA coefficients, despite being earned in part by Ukrainian players (for example, in the final of the last successful event, Euro 88, 7 out of starting 11 players were Ukrainians[6]), were transferred to the direct descendant of the Soviet national football team – the Russian national football team. As a result, a crisis was created for both the national team and the domestic league. When Ukraine returned to international football in late 1994 it did so as absolute beginners.[5]

In the following years, the Ukrainian team improved, showcasing talents like Andriy Shevchenko, Anatoliy Tymoshchuk and Serhiy Rebrov. However, Ukraine failed to qualify for any major tournaments prior to 2006.

Troubles with coaches[edit]

Soon after being accepted to FIFA and UEFA as a full member in 1992, Ukraine started its preparation to its first game. At first the head coach of the team was planned to be Valeriy Lobanovskyi, but at that time he had a current contract with the UAE national football team. Thus, the first manager of the team had to be chosen among members of a coaching council which consisted of Anatoliy Puzach (manager of Dynamo Kyiv), Yevhen Kucherevskyi (Dnipro Dnipropetrovsk), Yevhen Lemeshko (Torpedo Zaporizhia), Yukhym Shkolnykov (Bukovyna Chernivtsi) and Viktor Prokopenko (Chornomorets Odessa). Later they were joined by a native of Donetsk Valeriy Yaremchenko (Shakhtar Donetsk). At the end a circle of candidates narrowed down only to three names Puzach, Yaremnchenko, and Prokopenko who eventually became the head coach.

The first game of the team it was agreed to play against the Hungary national football team on 22 April 1992 in Kiev at the Respublikansky Stadium. Due to some financial issues, it was rearranged to 29 April 1992 and moved to the border with Hungary in Uzhhorod at the Avanhard Stadium. There was almost no preparation to the game as all "pioneers" gathered in Kiev on 27 April. At the same time the opponent, while failed to qualify for the UEFA Euro 1992, it was preparing for the 1994 FIFA World Cup qualification. Ukraine at that time failed to be accepted for the qualification cycle.

Unlike the Hungarian squad, players of which played along side before and were coached by the European Cup winning coach Emerich Jenei, Ukrainian team lost some its better and experienced players to the CIS national football team that was playing its own friendly against the England national football team in Moscow.[7] Among those players were Andrei Kanchelskis, Volodymyr Lyutyi, Sergei Yuran, Viktor Onopko, Oleksiy Mykhaylychenko, and Akhrik Tsveiba (the last two would return later). For the game against Hungary, only Ivan Hetsko and Oleh Luzhny had previous experience of playing at national team level. Other players had only played for the Soviet Olympic football team, while Serhiy Kovalets played for Ukraine at the Spartakiad of People of the USSR in 1986.

2006 FIFA World Cup[edit]

Andriy Shevchenko is taking a penalty kick against Tunisia
Ticket for the match 1/4 final of the 2006 World Cup Italy-Ukraine
Shevchenko is taking a free kick in game against Andorra (2009)

After an unsuccessful UEFA Euro 2004 qualifying campaign, Ukraine appointed Oleh Blokhin as the national team's head coach. Despite initial skepticism about his appointment due to his previous somewhat undistinguished coaching record and general public calls for a foreign coach, Ukraine went on to qualify for their first-ever FIFA World Cup on 3 September 2005, by drawing 1–1 against Georgia in Tbilisi. In their first World Cup (2006 FIFA World Cup), they were in the Group H together with Spain, Tunisia and Saudi Arabia. After losing 0–4 in the first match against Spain, the Ukrainians beat their other two opponents to reach the knock-out stage.

In the round of 16, Ukraine played against the winner of the Group G Switzerland, who they beat on penalties. In the quarter-finals they were beaten 0–3 by eventual champions Italy.

UEFA Euro 2012[edit]

Shevchenko is scoring a goal against Sweden

As a host nation Ukraine qualified automatically for UEFA Euro 2012,[1] marking their début in the UEFA European Championship. In their opening game against Sweden, Ukraine won 2–1 in Kiev. Despite the team's efforts, the co-hosts were eliminated after a 0–2 loss to France and a 0–1 loss to England, all in Donetsk.

2014 FIFA World Cup qualification – UEFA Group H[edit]

Team
Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts
 England 10 6 4 0 31 4 +27 22
 Ukraine 10 6 3 1 28 4 +24 21
 Montenegro 10 4 3 3 18 17 +1 15
 Poland 10 3 4 3 18 12 +6 13
 Moldova 10 3 2 5 12 17 −5 11
 San Marino 10 0 0 10 1 54 −53 0
  England Moldova Montenegro Poland San Marino Ukraine
England  4–0 4–1 2–0 5–0 1–1
Moldova  0–5 0–1 1–1 3–0 0–0
Montenegro  1–1 2–5 2–2 3–0 0–4
Poland  1–1 2–0 1–1 5–0 1–3
San Marino  0–8 0–2 0–6 1–5 0–8
Ukraine  0–0 2–1 0–1 1–0 9–0


UEFA Euro 2016 qualifying Group C[edit]

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification Slovakia Spain Ukraine Belarus Republic of Macedonia Luxembourg
1  Slovakia (X) 6 6 0 0 13 3 +10 18 Advance to final tournament 2–1 8 Sep 9 Oct 2–1 3–0
2  Spain 6 5 0 1 15 3 +12 15 5 Sep 1–0 3–0 5–1 9 Oct
3  Ukraine 6 4 0 2 9 2 +7 12 Final tournament or play-offs 0–1 12 Oct 5 Sep 1–0 3–0
4  Belarus 6 1 1 4 4 11 −7 4 1–3 0–1 0–2 12 Oct 8 Sep
5  Macedonia 6 1 0 5 6 14 −8 3 0–2 8 Sep 9 Oct 1–2 3–2
6  Luxembourg (Y) 6 0 1 5 3 17 −14 1 12 Oct 0–4 0–3 1–1 5 Sep
Updated to match(es) played on 14 June 2015. Source: UEFA
Rules for classification: Qualification tiebreakers
(X) Assured of at least third place (and play-offs), but may still qualify directly as one of the top two teams or as the best third-placed team; (Y) Cannot qualify directly as one of the top two teams, but may still qualify as third-placed team.

2018 FIFA World Cup qualification – UEFA Group I[edit]

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  Croatia 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Qualification to 2018 FIFA World Cup 12 Nov '16 24 Mar '17 5 Sep '16 6 Oct '17
2  Iceland 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Possible Second round[a] 11 Jun '17 5 Sep '17 9 Oct '16 6 Oct '16
3  Ukraine 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 Oct '17 5 Sep '16 2 Sep '17 12 Nov '16
4  Turkey 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 Sep '17 6 Oct '17 6 Oct '16 24 Mar '17
5  Finland 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 Oct '16 2 Sep '17 11 Jun '17 9 Oct '17
First match(es) will be played on 5 September 2016. Source: FIFA
Rules for classification: Qualification tiebreakers
Notes:
  1. ^ The eight best runners-up across all groups will advance to the Second round (play-offs). The ninth-ranked runners-up will be eliminated.

Stadiums[edit]

The most important matches of the Ukrainian national team are held in Kyiv's Olimpiyskiy National Sports Complex, also home of FC Dynamo Kyiv. New infrastructure and stadiums were built in preparation for Euro 2012, and other venues include stadiums in the cities of Donetsk, Kharkiv, Lviv, Dnipropetrovsk, Odessa. The alternative stadiums are: Donbass Arena (Donetsk), Metalist Stadium (Kharkiv), Arena Lviv (Lviv), Dnipro-Arena (Dnipropetrovsk), Chornomorets Stadium (Odessa).

During Soviet times (before 1991) only two stadiums in Ukraine were used in official games, they are the Olimpiysky NSC in Kiev (known then as Republican Stadium) and the Lokomotiv Stadium in Simferopol.

Recent and forthcoming matches[edit]

The following matches were played or are scheduled to be played by the national team in the current or upcoming seasons.

Last 12 months – 10 games, 6 win(s), 2 draw(s), 2 loss(es) – 13 scored & 4 allowed.
Best scorer(s): Yarmolenko with 4 goals

Player records[edit]

Most capped Ukraine players[edit]

Anatoliy Tymoshchuk and Andriy Shevchenko being honored by UEFA in 2011 for their 100th cap. They are the first and second, respectively, most capped players in the history of Ukraine.

As of 14 June 2015

# Name Career Caps Goals
1 Anatoliy Tymoshchuk 2000– 140 4
2 Andriy Shevchenko 1995–2012 111 48
3 Oleh Husyev 2003– 96 13
4 Oleksandr Shovkovskyi 1994–2012 92 0
5 Ruslan Rotan 2003– 80 7
6 Serhiy Rebrov 1992–2006 75 15
7 Andriy Voronin 2002–2012 74 8
8 Andriy Husin 1993–2006 71 9
9 Andriy Vorobey 2000–2008 68 9
10 Andriy Nesmachnyi 2000–2009 67 0
Andriy Shevchenko is the top scorer in the history of Ukraine with 48 goals.

Top Ukraine goalscorers[edit]

As of 14 June 2015

# Player Career Goals Caps Average
1 Andriy Shevchenko 1995–2012 48 111 0.43
2 Andriy Yarmolenko 2009– 19 49 0.39
3 Serhiy Rebrov 1992–2006 15 75 0.2
4 Oleh Husyev 2003– 13 96 0.14
5 Serhiy Nazarenko 2003–2012 12 56 0.21
6 Yevhen Konoplyanka 2010– 10 45 0.22
7 Yevhen Seleznyov 2008– 9 44 0.2
Andriy Vorobey 2000–2008 9 68 0.13
Andriy Husin 1993–2006 9 71 0.13
10 Tymerlan Huseynov 1993–1997 8 14 0.57
Artem Milevskyi 2006–2012 8 50 0.16
Andriy Voronin 2002–2012 8 74 0.11

Ukraine captains[edit]

As of 14 June 2015

# Player Career Captain Caps Total Caps
1 Andriy Shevchenko 1995–2012 58 111
2 Anatoliy Tymoshchuk 2000– 41 140
3 Oleh Luzhnyi 1992–2003 39 52
4 Oleksandr Holovko 1995–2004 13 58
Yuriy Kalitvintsev 1995–1999 13 22
6 Ruslan Rotan 2003– 12 80
Oleksandr Shovkovskyi 1994–2012 12 92
8 Hennadiy Lytovchenko 1993–1994 4 4
Yuriy Maksymov 1992–2002 4 27
10 Serhiy Diryavka 1992–1995 3 9
Oleksandr Kucher 2006– 3 46
Andriy Husin 1993–2006 3 71

Top 10 goalkeepers[edit]

As of 14 June 2015

# Player Career Games Wins GA GAA
1 Oleksandr Shovkovskyi 1994–2012 92 38 80 0.87
2 Andriy Pyatov 2007– 55 28 39 0.709
3 Oleh Suslov 1994–1997 12 7 15 1.25
4 Vitaliy Reva 2001–2003 9 3 10 1.111
5 Andriy Dykan 2010–2012 8 5 11 1.375
6 Maksym Levytskyi 2000–2002 8 1 10 1.25
7 Dmytro Tyapushkin 1994–1995 7 1 11 1.571
8 Valeriy Vorobyov 1994–1999 6 3 2 0.333
9 Dmytro Shutkov 1993–2003 5 2 4 0.8
10 Vyacheslav Kernozenko 2000–2008 5 2 8 1.6
  • ^1 Players in bold are still actively competing and are available for selection

Ukraine managers[edit]

Last updated on 14 June 2015.

Manager Nation Ukraine career Played Won Drawn Lost GF GA Win % Qualifying cycle Final tour
Viktor Prokopenko Ukraine 1992 3 0 1 2 2 5 0
Mykola Pavlov (caretaker) Ukraine 1992 1 0 1 0 1 1 0
Oleh Bazylevych Ukraine 1993–1994 11 4 3 4 13 14 36.36 1996
Mykola Pavlov (caretaker) Ukraine 1994 2 0 0 2 0 3 0
Yozhef Sabo Ukraine 1994 2 1 1 0 3 0 50 1996
Anatoliy Konkov Ukraine 1995 7 3 0 4 8 13 42.86 1996
Yozhef Sabo Ukraine 1996–1999 32 15 11 6 26 41 46.88 1998, 2000
Valeriy Lobanovskyi Ukraine 2000–2001 18 12 4 2 29 14 66.67 2002
Leonid Buryak Ukraine 2002–2003 19 14 3 2 38 13 73.68 2004
Oleh Blokhin Ukraine 2003–2007 46 21 14 11 78 26 45.65 2006, 2008 2006
Oleksiy Mykhaylychenko[8] Ukraine 2008–2009 20 15 1 4 41 12 75 2010
Myron Markevych[9][10][11] Ukraine 2010 4 3 1 0 9 3 75
Yuriy Kalytvyntsev (caretaker)[12][13] Ukraine 2010–2011 8 3 2 3 14 16 37.5
Oleh Blokhin[14][15] Ukraine 2011–2012 12 5 3 4 28 12 41.67 2014 2012
Andriy Bal (caretaker)[16] Ukraine 2012 3 1 1 1 2 1 33.33 2014
Oleksandr Zavarov (caretaker) Ukraine 2012 1 1 0 0 1 0 100
Mykhaylo Fomenko[17] Ukraine 2012– 24 17 4 3 50 10 70.83 2014, 2016


Coaching staff[edit]

Currently approved:

Head coach Ukraine Mykhaylo Fomenko[17]
Coach Ukraine Valeriy Dushkov
Coach Ukraine Oleksandr Zavarov
Coach Ukraine Volodymyr Onyshchenko
Goalkeeper Coach Ukraine Yuriy Syvukha
Manager Ukraine Oleh Taraday
Senior Administrator Ukraine Ruslan Volchanskyi
Administrator Ukraine Viktor Kashpur

Players[edit]

Current squad[edit]

The following players were called up for the UEFA Euro 2016 qualifying match against Luxembourg on 14 June 2015.[18]
Players' records are accurate as of 14 June 2015 after the match against Luxembourg.[19]

0#0 Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club
1 1GK Denys Boyko (1988-01-29) 29 January 1988 (age 27) 3 0 Ukraine Dnipro Dnipropetrovsk
12 1GK Andriy Pyatov (1984-06-28) 28 June 1984 (age 31) 55 0 Ukraine Shakhtar Donetsk
23 1GK Mykyta Shevchenko (1993-01-26) 26 January 1993 (age 22) 0 0 Ukraine Zorya Luhansk
3 2DF Yevhen Khacheridi (1987-07-28) 28 July 1987 (age 28) 34 3 Ukraine Dynamo Kyiv
5 2DF Oleksandr Kucher (1982-10-22) 22 October 1982 (age 32) 46 2 Ukraine Shakhtar Donetsk
13 2DF Vyacheslav Shevchuk (1979-05-13) 13 May 1979 (age 36) 44 0 Ukraine Shakhtar Donetsk
17 2DF Andriy Pylyavskyi (1988-12-04) 4 December 1988 (age 26) 1 0 Ukraine Zorya Luhansk
20 2DF Yaroslav Rakytskyi (1989-08-03) 3 August 1989 (age 25) 32 4 Ukraine Shakhtar Donetsk
2 3MF Mykola Morozyuk (1988-01-17) 17 January 1988 (age 27) 13 1 Ukraine Dynamo Kyiv
4 3MF Anatoliy Tymoshchuk (Captain) (1979-03-30) 30 March 1979 (age 36) 140 4 Kazakhstan Kairat Almaty
6 3MF Taras Stepanenko (1989-08-08) 8 August 1989 (age 25) 21 1 Ukraine Shakhtar Donetsk
7 3MF Andriy Yarmolenko (1989-10-23) 23 October 1989 (age 25) 49 19 Ukraine Dynamo Kyiv
8 3MF Denys Oliynyk (1987-08-16) 16 August 1987 (age 27) 12 0 Netherlands Vitesse
9 3MF Oleh Husyev (1983-04-25) 25 April 1983 (age 32) 96 13 Ukraine Dynamo Kyiv
10 3MF Yevhen Konoplyanka (1989-09-29) 29 September 1989 (age 25) 45 10 Spain Sevilla
14 3MF Ruslan Rotan (1981-10-29) 29 October 1981 (age 33) 80 7 Ukraine Dnipro Dnipropetrovsk
16 3MF Serhiy Sydorchuk (1991-05-02) 2 May 1991 (age 24) 6 2 Ukraine Dynamo Kyiv
18 3MF Serhiy Rybalka (1990-04-01) 1 April 1990 (age 25) 2 0 Ukraine Dynamo Kyiv
19 3MF Denys Harmash (1990-04-19) 19 April 1990 (age 25) 20 2 Ukraine Dynamo Kyiv
11 4FW Yevhen Seleznyov (1985-07-20) 20 July 1985 (age 30) 44 9 Ukraine Dnipro Dnipropetrovsk
15 4FW Pylyp Budkivskyi (1992-03-10) 10 March 1992 (age 23) 6 0 Ukraine Zorya Luhansk
21 4FW Oleksandr Hladkyi (1987-08-24) 24 August 1987 (age 27) 9 1 Ukraine Shakhtar Donetsk
22 4FW Artem Kravets (1989-06-03) 3 June 1989 (age 26) 6 2 Ukraine Dynamo Kyiv

Recent call-ups[edit]

The following players have been called up for the team within the last 12 months.[20][21][22][23][24][25]

Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club Latest call-up
GK Oleksandr Rybka (1987-04-10) 10 April 1987 (age 28) 2 0 Ukraine Dynamo Kyiv v.  Latvia, 31 March 2015
GK Rustam Khudzhamov (1982-10-05) 5 October 1982 (age 32) 1 0 Ukraine Shakhtar Donetsk v.  Macedonia, 12 October 2014
GK Dmytro Bezotosnyi (1983-11-15) 15 November 1983 (age 31) 0 0 Azerbaijan Gabala v.  Belarus, 9 October 2014 INJ
DF Artem Fedetskyi (1985-04-26) 26 April 1985 (age 30) 38 2 Ukraine Dnipro Dnipropetrovsk v.  Latvia, 31 March 2015
DF Mykyta Burda (1995-03-24) 24 March 1995 (age 20) 0 0 Ukraine Dynamo Kyiv v.  Spain, 27 March 2015
DF Ivan Ordets (1992-07-08) 8 July 1992 (age 23) 2 1 Ukraine Shakhtar Donetsk v.  Lithuania, 18 November 2014
DF Vitaliy Vernydub (1987-10-17) 17 October 1987 (age 27) 1 0 Azerbaijan Gabala v.  Lithuania, 18 November 2014
DF Yevhen Makarenko Injured (1991-05-21) 21 May 1991 (age 24) 3 0 Ukraine Dynamo Kyiv v.  Slovakia, 8 September 2014
MF Pavlo Ksyonz (1987-01-02) 2 January 1987 (age 28) 1 0 Ukraine Karpaty Lviv v.  Georgia, 9 June 2015
MF Maksym Malyshev (1992-12-24) 24 December 1992 (age 22) 0 0 Ukraine Shakhtar Donetsk v.  Georgia, 9 June 2015
MF Roman Bezus (1990-09-26) 26 September 1990 (age 24) 19 4 Ukraine Dnipro Dnipropetrovsk v.  Latvia, 31 March 2015
MF Artem Hromov (1990-01-14) 14 January 1990 (age 25) 2 0 Ukraine Vorskla Poltava v.  Latvia, 31 March 2015
MF Ruslan Malinovskyi (1993-05-04) 4 May 1993 (age 22) 1 0 Ukraine Zorya Luhansk v.  Latvia, 31 March 2015
MF Dmytro Khomchenovskyi (1990-04-16) 16 April 1990 (age 25) 4 0 Ukraine Zorya Luhansk v.  Lithuania, 18 November 2014
MF Kyrylo Kovalchuk (1986-06-11) 11 June 1986 (age 29) 4 0 Ukraine Metalist Kharkiv v.  Lithuania, 18 November 2014
MF Edmar Halovskyi (1980-06-16) 16 June 1980 (age 35) 15 1 Unattached v.  Luxembourg, 15 November 2014 INJ
MF Serhiy Bolbat (1993-06-13) 13 June 1993 (age 22) 1 0 Belgium Lokeren v.  Belarus, 9 October 2014 PRE
MF Pavlo Rebenok (1985-07-25) 25 July 1985 (age 30) 0 0 Belarus Torpedo-BelAZ Zhodino v.  Slovakia, 8 September 2014
MF Yevhen Shakhov (1990-11-30) 30 November 1990 (age 24) 0 0 Ukraine Dnipro Dnipropetrovsk v.  Slovakia, 8 September 2014
FW Roman Zozulya Injured (1989-11-17) 17 November 1989 (age 25) 22 3 Ukraine Dnipro Dnipropetrovsk v.  Spain, 27 March 2015
FW Volodymyr Homenyuk (1985-07-19) 19 July 1985 (age 30) 8 0 Ukraine Stal Dniprodzerzhynsk v.  Macedonia, 12 October 2014

Notes:

  • Injured = Injured or recovering from surgery
  • INJ = Withdrew because of injury.
  • PRE = Preliminary squad.
  • RET = Retired from the national team.

Previous squads[edit]

Competitive record[edit]

FIFA World Cup record[edit]

FIFA World Cup FIFA World Cup Qualification
Year Round Position Pld W D * L GF GA Pld W D L GF GA
1930–1990 Part of  Soviet Union
United States 1994 Did Not Enter (spot not granted by FIFA) Did Not Enter (spot not granted by FIFA)
France 1998 Did Not Qualify 12 6 3 3 11 9
South Korea Japan 2002 12 4 6 2 15 13
Germany 2006 Quarter-Finals 8th 5 2 1 2 5 7 12 7 4 1 18 7
South Africa 2010 Did Not Qualify 12 6 4 2 21 7
Brazil 2014 12 7 3 2 30 7
Russia 2018 To Be Determined
Qatar 2022
Total Quarter-final 1/6 5 2 1 2 5 7 60 30 20 10 95 43
* Denotes draws include knock-out matches decided on penalty kicks.

UEFA European Championship record[edit]

UEFA European Championship UEFA European Championship Qualification
Year Round Position Pld W D L GF GA Pld W D L GF GA
1960–1992 Part of  Soviet Union Part of  Soviet Union
England 1996 Did Not Qualify 10 4 1 5 11 15
Belgium Netherlands 2000 12 5 6 1 16 7
Portugal 2004 8 2 4 2 11 10
Austria Switzerland 2008 12 5 2 5 18 16
Poland Ukraine 2012 Group Stage 13th 3 1 0 2 2 4 Qualified as host nation
France 2016 To Be Determined 4 3 0 1 6 1
2020 To Be Determined
Total Group Stage 1/5 3 1 0 2 2 4 46 19 13 14 62 49

Qualifying campaigns[edit]

FIFA World Cup UEFA European Championship
1994 – Qualifying spot not granted by FIFA 1996 – 4th in Qualifying group 4
1998 – 2nd in Qualifying group 9, lost to Croatia in play-off 2000 – 2nd in Qualifying group 4, lost to Slovenia in play-off
2002 – 2nd in Qualifying group 5, lost to Germany in play-off 2004 – 3rd in Qualifying group 6
2006Qualified for the tournament (1st in Qualifying group 2) 2008 – 4th in Qualifying group B
2010 – 2nd in Qualifying group 6, lost to Greece in play-off 2012Qualified as host nation
2014 – 2nd in Qualifying group H, lost to France in play-off 2016 – TBD

All-time team record[edit]

World Map of the Ukraine's opponents (2014)

The following table shows Ukraine's all-time international record, correct as of 14 June 2015.[26]

Against Played Won Drawn Lost GF GA GD
 Albania 4 3 1 0 6 2 +4
 Andorra 4 4 0 0 17 0 +17
 Armenia 8 5 3 0 17 8 +9
 Austria 2 1 0 1 4 4 0
 Azerbaijan 2 1 1 0 6 0 +6
 Belarus 8 4 3 1 9 4 +5
 Bulgaria 5 3 2 0 7 2 +5
 Brazil 1 0 0 1 0 2 -2
 Cameroon 1 0 1 0 0 0 0
 Canada 1 0 1 0 2 2 0
 Chile 1 1 0 0 2 1 +1
 Costa Rica 1 1 0 0 4 0 +4
 Croatia 7 1 3 3 5 12 -7
 Cyprus 2 0 1 1 4 5 -1
 Czech Republic 2 0 1 1 0 4 -4
 Denmark 3 1 1 1 2 2 0
 England 7 1 2 4 3 9 -6
 Estonia 4 4 0 0 10 0 +10
 France 9 1 3 5 5 14 -9
 Faroe Islands 2 2 0 0 7 0 +7
 Georgia 9 6 3 0 16 6 +10
 Germany 5 0 3 2 5 10 -5
 Greece 6 2 2 2 4 3 +1
 Hungary 2 0 0 2 2 5 -3
 Iran 1 0 0 1 0 1 -1
 Iceland 2 1 1 0 2 1 +1
 Israel 6 2 2 2 7 5 +2
 Italy 7 0 1 6 2 14 -12
 Japan 2 1 0 1 1 1 0
 Kazakhstan 4 4 0 0 9 3 +6
 South Korea 2 0 0 2 0 3 -3
 Latvia 3 2 1 0 3 1 +2
 Lithuania 8 5 1 2 15 8 +7
 Libya 2 1 1 0 4 1 +3
 Luxembourg 3 3 0 0 9 0 +9
 Mexico 1 0 0 1 1 2 -1
 Moldova 5 3 2 0 6 3 +3
 Montenegro 2 1 0 1 4 1 +3
 Macedonia 3 1 1 1 1 1 0
 Netherlands 2 0 1 1 1 4 -3
 Niger 1 1 0 0 2 1 +1
 Northern Ireland 4 2 2 0 3 1 +2
 Norway 5 4 1 0 5 0 +5
 Poland 7 3 2 2 9 8 +1
 Portugal 2 1 0 1 2 2 0
 Romania 5 1 1 3 6 11 -5
 Russia 2 1 1 0 4 3 +1
 San Marino 2 2 0 0 17 0 +17
 Saudi Arabia 1 1 0 0 4 0 +4
 Scotland 2 1 0 1 3 3 0
 Serbia 4 4 0 0 7 1 +6
 Slovakia 4 1 2 1 5 5 0
 Slovenia 4 0 2 2 4 6 -2
 Spain 4 0 1 3 3 9 -6
  Switzerland 2 1 1 0 2 2 0
 Sweden 4 2 1 1 4 3 +1
 Tunisia 1 1 0 0 1 0 +1
 Turkey 6 1 1 4 5 9 -4
 United Arab Emirates 1 0 1 0 1 1 0
 United States 4 3 1 0 5 1 +4
 Uruguay 1 0 0 1 2 3 -1
 Uzbekistan 2 2 0 0 4 1 +3
 Wales 2 0 2 0 1 1 0
Total 205 94 57 55 291 198 +93

Home venues record[edit]

Since Ukraine's first fixture (29 April 1992 vs. Hungary) they have played their home games at 11 different stadiums.

Venue City Played Won Drawn Lost GF GA Points per game
Olimpiyskyi Kiev 53 26 18 9 80 43 1.81
VVL Dynamo Kiev 20 13 5 2 38 15 2.2
Metalist Kharkiv 7 2 1 4 9 8 1
Ukraina Lviv 6 6 0 0 14 5 3
Arena Lviv Lviv 6 4 2 0 16 2 2.33
Donbass Arena Donetsk 5 0 1 4 2 9 0.2
Chornomorets Odessa 3 2 1 0 4 2 2.33
Dnipro Dnipropetrovsk 2 2 0 0 2 0 3
Shakhtar Donetsk 2 0 1 1 0 2 0.5
Meteor Dnipropetrovsk 1 0 1 0 2 2 1
Avanhard Uzhhorod 1 0 0 1 1 3 0
Totals 106 55 30 21 168 91 1.84
Last updated: 14 June 2015. Statistics include official FIFA-recognised matches only.

FIFA Ranking history [27][edit]

1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014
90 77 71 59 49 47 27 34 45 45 60 57 40 13 30 15 22 34 55 47 18 17

Sports kits and sponsors[edit]

Team kit prior to Feb. 2006 – Lotto
Team kit used in 2009 – Adidas

On 29 March 2010, Ukraine debuted a new Adidas kit.[28] This replaced the Adidas kit with a yellow base and the traditional Adidas three stripe with a snake sash which was used in 2009.[29] Prior to 5 February 2009 Ukraine wore a Lotto kit.

Sponsors[edit]

Marketing for the Football Federation of Ukraine is conducted by the Ukraine Football International (UFI).

Former title and general sponsors included Ukrtelekom and Kyivstar.[33]

Kits[edit]

Kit providers[edit]

The official team kit is currently produced by German company Adidas which has a contract with the Ukrainian team until 31 December 2016.

Period Kit provider
1992 – 1996 United Kingdom Umbro
1997 – 2002 Germany Puma
2002 – 2008 Italy Lotto
2009 – present Germany Adidas

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Ukraine determine own future, UEFA
  2. ^ NSK Olimpiysky, Ukrainian Soccer Portal
  3. ^ The Ukrainian Football National Team of 1925–1935 (Ukrainian)
  4. ^ Ukrainian Soccer History website (Ukrainian)
  5. ^ a b Ukraine’s forgotten World Cup pedigree, Business Ukraine (4 August 2010)
  6. ^ "RSSSF European Championship 1988 – Final Tournament – Full Details". Rsssf.com. Retrieved 2011-12-07. 
  7. ^ 1992 season of the Russian national football tean. Rusteam.permian.ru
  8. ^ Ukraine decides not to renew coach's contract, Kyiv Post (23 December 2009)
  9. ^ Markevych, Surkis sign contract of national football team's chief coach, Kyiv Post (21 April 2010)
  10. ^ "Офіційна заява Мирона Маркевича (Official petition of Myron Markevych)". metalist.kharkov.ua (in Ukrainian). 21 August 2010. 
  11. ^ "Copy of the document for the resgnation". Retrieved 2011-12-07. 
  12. ^ "Збірну довірили Калитвинцеву (National team was entrusted to Kalitvintsev)". www.ffu.org.ua (in Ukrainian). 25 August 2010. 
  13. ^ Markevich leaves Ukraine helm, UEFA (August 25, 2010)
  14. ^ Ukraine appoint Blokhin, Sky Sports (21 April 2011)
  15. ^ Oleg Blokhin appointed Ukraine coach, Reuters (21 April 2011)
  16. ^ Андрій Баль призначений в.о. головного тренера збірної України (Andriy Bal is appointed acting head coach of the Ukrainian national team), www.ua-football.com (6 October 2012)
  17. ^ a b Ukraine's football federation taps Fomenko to coach national team, Kyiv Post (26 December 2012)
  18. ^ Фоменко на матчи против Грузии и Люксембурга вызвал в сборную Украины 25 человек
  19. ^ http://www.national-football-teams.com/country/196/2015/Ukraine.html
  20. ^ http://ffu.org.ua/eng/teams/teams_main/12974/
  21. ^ http://ffu.org.ua/eng/teams/teams_main/13141/
  22. ^ http://ffu.org.ua/eng/teams/teams_main/13304/
  23. ^ http://ffu.org.ua/eng/teams/teams_main/13332/
  24. ^ http://ffu.org.ua/eng/teams/teams_main/13340/
  25. ^ http://ffu.org.ua/eng/teams/teams_main/13586/
  26. ^ "All matches". ffu.org.ua. Retrieved 8 October 2010. 
  27. ^ FIFA-ranking
  28. ^ "Новую форму сборной первым примерил Ракицкий (+фото) (New uniform for the National team was first fitted by Rakytsky with photo)". ua.football (in Russian). Globalinfo (Kiev, Ukraine). 29 March 2010. 
  29. ^ "Ukraine 09/10 Adidas football kits". footballshirtculture. 6 February 2009. Retrieved 11 June 2009. 
  30. ^ National team sponsor promised $2 mln for advancing to the WC-2014
  31. ^ Article-news at epicentrk.com.ua
  32. ^ Presentation of new sponsors in 2013 on YouTube. Youtube channel of FFU.
  33. ^ Explanation of sponsorship.

External links[edit]