Ukrainian parliamentary election, 1998

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Ukrainian parliamentary election, 1998
Ukraine
← 1994 29 March 1998 2002 →

All 450 seats of the Verkhovna Rada of Ukraine
226 seats needed for a majority
  First party Second party Third party
  Symonenko Petr.png Chornovil Vyacheslav.jpg Moroz Yushchenko cropped.jpg
Leader Petro Symonenko Vyacheslav Chornovil Oleksandr Moroz
Party Communist Party People's Movement SPU-SelPU
Leader since 1993 1989 1991
Seats won 122 46 35
Percentage 24.7% 9.4% 8.6%

  Fourth party Fifth party Sixth party
  Anatoliy Matviyenko.jpg Pavlo Lazarenko.jpg Vitaliy Kononov.jpg
Leader Anatoliy Matviyenko Pavlo Lazarenko Vitaliy Kononov
Party NDPU Hromada Greens
Leader since 1996 1994 1990
Seats won 27 23 19
Percentage 5% 4.7% 5.4%

Вибори ВРУ 2012 Лідери ТВО партії.PNG
Results of the 1998 parliamentary election.

Chairman of Parliament before election

Oleksandr Moroz
Socialist Party

Elected Chairman of Parliament

Oleksandr Tkachenko
Peasants Party

Lesser Coat of Arms of Ukraine.svg
This article is part of a series on the
politics and government of
Ukraine

Parliamentary elections were held in Ukraine on 29 March 1998.[1] The Communist Party of Ukraine remained the largest party in the Verkhovna Rada, winning 121 of the 445 seats.[2]

After the election votes in five electoral districts had too many irregularities to declare a winner and the parliament was five members short of 450.

Electoral system[edit]

In comparison to the first parliamentary election, this time half of 450 parliament seats were filled by single-seat majority winners in 225 electoral regions (constituencies), and the other half were split among political parties and blocks[3] that received at least 4% of the popular vote.

Results[edit]

The Communist Party of Ukraine was victorious in 18 regions including the city of Kiev, while in three other regions the party finished in second place. The People's Movement of Ukraine (Rukh) won in five regions, all of them located in Western Ukraine and was a strong runner-up in three others, mostly in the west and Kiev. The electoral block of Socialists and Peasants was able to secure a victory in only two regions, however it did finish strong in seven other regions across central Ukraine. The new and rising party of Hromada won the Dnipropetrovsk Region, while the Social-Democratic Party of Ukraine managed to secure the Zakarpattia Region.

Notable and strong runners up were the Party of Greens, the People's Democratic Party, the Progressive Socialist Party, the People's Party, Working Ukraine, the National Front and Our Ukraine.


e • d  Summary of the 29 March 1998 Verkhovna Rada election results
Parties and coalitions Nationwide constituency Const.
seats
Total seats
Votes  % Seats Seats +/-
Communist Party of Ukraine 6,550,353 24.65 84 38
122 / 450
People's Movement of Ukraine 2,498,262 9.40 32 14
46 / 450
For Truth, for People, for Ukraine! Socialist Party of Ukraine
Peasant Party of Ukraine
2,273,788 8.56 29 6
35 / 450
Party of Greens of Ukraine 1,444,264 5.44 19
19 / 450
People's Democratic Party 1,331,460 5.01 17 10
27 / 450
Hromada 1,242,235 4.68 16 7
23 / 450
Progressive Socialist Party of Ukraine 1,075,118 4.05 14 3
17 / 450
Social Democratic Party of Ukraine (united) 1,066,113 4.01 14 3
17 / 450
Agrarian Party of Ukraine 978,330 3.68 7
7 / 450
Reforms and Order Party 832,574 3.13 4
4 / 450
Laborious Ukraine Civil Congress of Ukraine
Ukrainian Party of Justice
813,326 3.06 1
1 / 450
National Front Congress of Ukrainian Nationalists
Ukrainian Conservative Republican Party
Ukrainian Republican Party
721,966 2.72 7
7 / 450
Together Liberal Party of Ukraine
Party of Labor
502,969 1.89 2
2 / 450
Forward Ukraine! Christian Democratic Union
Ukrainian Christian Democratic Party
461,924 1.74 3
3 / 450
Christian Democratic Party of Ukraine 344,826 1.30 2
2 / 450
Bloc of Democratic Parties — NEP Democratic Party of Ukraine
Party of Economic Revival
326,489 1.23 2
2 / 450
Party of National Economic Development of Ukraine 250,476 0.94
Elephant — Social Liberal Association Viche
Inter-regional Bloc of Reforms
241,367 0.91 1
1 / 450
Party of Regional Revival of Ukraine 241,262 0.91 2
2 / 450
All-Ukrainian Party of Workers 210,622 0.79 1
1 / 450
Union 186,249 0.70 1
1 / 450
All-Ukrainian Party of Women's Initiatives 154,650 0.58
Republican Christian Party 143,496 0.54
Ukrainian National Assembly 105,977 0.39
Social Democratic Party of Ukraine 85,045 0.32
Motherland Defenders Party 81,808 0.31
Party of Spiritual, Economic and Social Progress 53,147 0.20
Party of Muslims of Ukraine 52,613 0.20
Less Words Social-National Party of Ukraine
State Independence of Ukraine
45,155 0.16 1
1 / 450
European Choice of Ukraine Liberal Democratic Party of Ukraine
Ukrainian Peasant Democratic Party
37,118 0.13
Independents 105
105 / 450
Against all 1,396,592 5.26
Invalid ballot papers 821,699 3.09
Vacant (constituencies with no result) 5 5
Total 26,571,273 100 225 225 450
Registered voters/turnout 37,540,092 70.78
Source: Central Electoral Commission
Notes:

By regions (single constituency)[4][edit]

1998 constituents winners
Crimea (10/10)
Vinnytsia Region (8/8)
Volyn Region (4/5)
Dnipropetrovsk Region (16/17)
  • Hromada 6 (1-Independent)
  • No party affiliation 5
  • Communist 3
  • Interregional bloc 1
  • Agrarian 1
Donetsk Region (21/23)
  • No party affiliation 12
  • Communist 7
  • Party of Regions 2
Zhytomyr Region (5/6)
  • No party affiliation 2
  • People-Democratic 1
  • Communist 1
  • Christian-Democratic 1
Zakarpattia Region (5/5)
  • Social-Democratic (u) 3
  • No party affiliation 2
Zaporizhia Region (7/9)
  • No party affiliation 3
  • Communist 3 (1-Independent)
  • Agrarian 1
Ivano-Frankivsk Region (6/6)
  • No party affiliation 2
  • National Front 2 (all CUN)
  • Labor and Liberal together 1 (Independent)
  • Christian people 1
Kirovohrad Region (3/5)
  • No party affiliation 3
Luhansk Region (12/12)
  • Communist 8
  • No party affiliation 4
Lviv Region (10/12)
  • People's Movement 2
  • Reforms and Order 2
  • National Front 2 (all Independent)
  • Fewer words 1
  • No party affiliation 1
  • Christian-Democratic 1
  • Agrarian 1
Mykolaiv Region (3/6)
  • No party affiliation 2
  • Reforms and Order 1
Odessa Region (10/11)
  • No party affiliation 6
  • Communist 2
  • Agrarian 1 (Independent)
  • Social and Peasant 1
Kiev Region (7/8)
  • No party affiliation 4
  • Social and Peasant 1 (Socialist)
  • Agrarian 1
  • People's Movement 1
Poltava Region (8/8)
  • Communist 3
  • No party affiliation 2
  • People's Movement 1
  • People-Democratic 1 (Independent)
  • Forward 1 (Independent)
Rivne Region (5/5)
  • People's Movement 3
  • No party affiliation 2
Sumy Region (6/6)
  • No party affiliation 2
  • Progressive Socialist 2
  • Communist 1
  • Justice 1
Ternopil Region (4/5)
  • People's Movement 2
  • No party affiliation 1
  • National Front 1 (CUN)
Kharkiv Region (12/14)
  • No party affiliation 6
  • Communist 2
  • Agrarian 1
  • Social and Peasant 1 (Independent)
  • Progressive Socialist 1 (Independent)
  • People-Democratic 1
Kherson Region (6/6)
  • No party affiliation 2
  • Hromada 1
  • Communist 1
  • Christian-Democratic 1
  • Social and Peasant 1 (Socialist)
Khmelnytsky Region (7/7)
  • No party affiliation 4
  • Republican 1
  • Socialist 1
  • Communist 1
Cherkasy Region (7/7)
  • No party affiliation 3
  • Communist 2
  • Social and Peasant 1 (Peasant)
  • People-Democratic 1
Chernivtsi Region (4/4)
  • No party affiliation 3
  • People's Movement 1
Chernihiv Region (5/6)
  • No party affiliation 4
  • People-Democratic 1
Kiev (11/12)
  • No party affiliation 8
  • Democratic Parties 1 (Independent)
  • People's Movement 1
  • Reforms and Order 1
Sevastopol (2/2)
  • No party affiliation 1
  • Communist 1

Party affiliation changes after 1998 election[edit]

The size of the factions created in parliament after the election fluctuated.[5] By January 2000 the Progressive Socialist Party of Ukraine and Hromada did not have any deputies; while Peasant Party of Ukraine had deputies only in 1999.[5] All these factions where disbanded for lack of members.[6]

Party of Regional Revival of Ukraine (later to become the biggest party of Ukraine as Party of Regions[7]) grew massively in parliament (after in March 2001 it united with four parties) from 2 deputies elected in this election to a faction of 24 people in July 2002 (one deputy left the faction later).[5][8][9] Later to become second biggest party of Ukraine,[7] Batkivshchyna, started its existence as a faction when in the spring of 1999 members of Hromada left their party to join other parliament factions, among them Yulia Tymoshenko who set up the parliamentary faction "Batkivshchyna" in March 1999.[10][11][12]

People's Movement of Ukraine split into 2 different factions in the spring of 1999 (the largest membership of the breakaway faction led by Hennadiy Udovenko was 19 and ended with 14, the "other" faction ended with 23; meaning that 10 elected People's Movement of Ukraine deputies did not represent any segment of the party anymore by June 2002).[5][6]

Other mayor "non-elected" factions/parties to emerge in parliament after the election were: Solidarity[13] (27 to 20 members[5]) and Labour Ukraine[14] (38 members in June 2002[5]); by June 2002 the parliament had 8 more factions then its original 8 in May 1998.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Nohlen, D & Stöver, P (2010) Elections in Europe: A data handbook, p1976 ISBN 978-3-8329-5609-7
  2. ^ Nohlen & Stöver, p1991
  3. ^ Against All Odds: Aiding Political Parties in Georgia and Ukraine (UvA Proefschriften) by Max Bader, Vossiuspers UvA, 2010, ISBN 90-5629-631-0 (page 93)
  4. ^ Deputies/Elected in multi-mandate constituency/Elections 29.11.1998, Central Election Commission of Ukraine
  5. ^ a b c d e f g Understanding Ukrainian Politics: Power, Politics, and Institutional Design by Paul D'Anieri, M.E. Sharpe, 2006, ISBN 978-0-7656-1811-5
  6. ^ a b Ukraine and Russia: The Post-Soviet Transition by Roman Solchanyk, Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2001 ISBN 0742510174
  7. ^ a b After the parliamentary elections in Ukraine: a tough victory for the Party of Regions, Centre for Eastern Studies (7 November 2012)
  8. ^ 2001 Political sketches: too early for summing up, Central European University (January 4, 2002)
  9. ^ Ukraine Political Parties, GlobalSecurity.org
  10. ^ Revolution in Orange: The Origins of Ukraine's Democratic Breakthrough by Anders Aslund and Michael A. McFaul, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, 2006, ISBN 978-0-87003-221-9
  11. ^ State Building in Ukraine: The Ukrainian Parliament, 1990-2003 by Sarah Whitmore, Routledge, 2004, ISBN 978-0-415-33195-1, page 106
  12. ^ (in Ukrainian) Всеукраїнське об'єднання "Батьківщина" All-Ukrainian Union Batkivshchyna, RBC Ukraine
  13. ^ Ukrainian Political Update by Taras Kuzio and Alex Frishberg, Frishberg & Partners, 21 February 2008 (page 22)
  14. ^ Explaining State Capture and State Capture Modes by Oleksiy Omelyanchuk, Central European University, 2001 (page 22)
    Trudova Ukraina elects a new chairman, Policy Documentation Center (November 27, 2000)

External links[edit]