Ulch people

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Ulchs
Alternative names:
Ulch, Ul'chi, Ulchi
Total population
2,913 (2002 estimate)
Regions with significant populations
 Russia 2,765[1]
 Ukraine 76[2]
Languages
Ulch language, Russian
Religion
Shamanism, Russian Orthodoxy
Related ethnic groups
Orok, Itelmen, Evenki, Negidals, Nanai, Udege

The Ulch (Russian: ульчи, obsolete ольчи; self designation: нани, nani) are an indigenous paleo-asian people of the Russian Far East who now speak a Tungusic language, Ulch. Over 90% of Ulchis live in Ulchsky District of Khabarovsk Krai, Russia. According to the 2002 Census, there were 2,913 Ulchs living in Russia — down from 3,173 recorded in the 1989 Census, but up from 2,494 recorded in the 1979 Census, and 2,410 recorded in the 1970 Census. According to the 2010 Census there were 2,765 Ulchs in Russia.

In terms of cultural anthropology, the Ulch do not constitute a homogeneous group.[citation needed] They are sometimes considered grouped with other so-called "Paleosiberian" peoples, also known as the "Amur-Sakhalin group" (like the Ainu, Chukchi, Nivkh and other Tungusic peoples like the Oroch).

The population genetics of the Ulchi are linked to 7,700 year old remains from Chertovy Vorota Cave ("Devil's Gate") and are also genetically similar to an East Asian genetic component within Native Americans. The Ulchi do not appear to have originally possessed the "Ancient North Eurasian" (ANE) genetic component found in Native American, Central Asian, South Asians and West Eurasian (European and Middle Eastern populations; the Ulchi are also genetically distinct from the more numerous East Siberian groups in modern times, such as Mongolian and Turkic peoples.[3][4]

Interior of a Mangun House, drawing by Richard Maack ca. 1854-1860

References[edit]

  1. ^ Russian Census 2010: Population by ethnicity (in Russian)
  2. ^ [1]
  3. ^ Siska, V; Jones, ER; Jeon, S; Bhak, Y; Kim, HM; Cho, YS; Kim, H; Lee, K; Veselovskaya, E; Balueva, T; Gallego-Llorente, M; Hofreiter, M; Bradley, DG; Eriksson, A; Pinhasi, R; Bhak, J; Manica, A. "Genome-wide data from two early Neolithic East Asian individuals dating to 7700 years ago". Sci Adv. 3: e1601877. doi:10.1126/sciadv.1601877. PMC 5287702Freely accessible. PMID 28164156. 
  4. ^ http://advances.sciencemag.org/content/3/2/e1601877.full