Ulmus × hollandica 'Daveyi'

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Ulmus × hollandica cultivar
Davey Elm Trenance 3.jpg
Wind-pruned Davey Elm, Trenance Farm, Cornwall, UK
Hybrid parentage U. glabra × U. minor 'Stricta'?
Cultivar 'Daveyi'
Origin England

The Davey Elm, Ulmus × hollandica 'Daveyi', is an English hybrid cultivar of unknown specific origin, generally restricted to the valleys of Cornwall. Its apparent south-west England provenance, along with its foliage and habit, suggest that it may be a hybrid of Wych Elm and Cornish Elm.[1][2]

Description[edit]

The wide-spreading, irregular branches support pendulous branchlets. The leaves are comparatively small, rarely exceeding 6 cm in length by 5 cm wide, with a glabrous upper surface.[3][4][5] Photographs often show this tree in its windswept coastal form; inland its shape resembles more closely its putative Wych Elm parent, though with a denser crown.[1]

Pests and diseases[edit]

The tree is susceptible to Dutch elm disease.

Cultivation[edit]

A number of mature specimens are known to survive in south-west England, notably around Gulval, Newquay, the Roseland and St Kew in Cornwall.[1][6] The tree is not known to have been introduced to North America or Australasia, and is not in commerce in the UK.

Notable trees[edit]

The UK TROBI Champion grows in woodland behind Lancaster Avenue at Goodrington; when last measured in 2004 it was 22 m high by 100 cm d.b.h..[7] Other fine specimens can be found at Trenance Farm, St Newlyn East, Newquay.

Synonymy[edit]

  • Ulmus major var. daveyi Henry,[5]

Etymology[edit]

The Davey Elm was named by Augustine Henry for Frederick Hamilton Davey (1868-1915), Cornish botanist and author of the Flora of Cornwall, first published in 1909 and reprinted in 1978.[5]

Accessions[edit]

Europe[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Elm Trees - Cornwall Council". Cornwall Council. 
  2. ^ Archie Miles, Hidden Trees of Britain, Ebury Press, 2007, p.17
  3. ^ Davey, Frederick Hamilton (1909). Flora of Cornwall. p. 401. 
  4. ^ Thurston, Edgar (1922). Supplement to the Flora of Cornwall. pp. xiv,124. 
  5. ^ a b c Elwes, Henry John; Henry, Augustine (1913). The Trees of Great Britain & Ireland. 7. p. 1884. 
  6. ^ Tree Register Of the British Isles.
  7. ^ Johnson, O. (2011). Champion Trees of Britain & Ireland, 169. Kew Publishing, Kew, London. ISBN 9781842464526.
  8. ^ "List of plants in the {elm} collection". Brighton & Hove City Council. Retrieved 23 September 2016.