Ulmus americana 'Beebe's Weeping'

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Ulmus americana 'Beebe's Weeping'
Ulmus americana 'Beebe's Weeping'3.JPG
'Beebe's Weeping', Illinois
SpeciesUlmus americana
OriginGalena, Illinois, US

The American Elm cultivar Ulmus americana 'Beebe's Weeping' was propagated from a tree growing in the wild at Galena, Illinois, by Mr. E. Beebe circa 1889.[1] It was marketed by the Klehm nursery of Arlington Heights, Illinois, in the early 20th century, as Ulmus 'American Galena Weeping', "American Weeping Elm".[2]

Description[edit]

'Beebe's Weeping' has thick cord-like branches which curve over as they grow, similar to a Weeping Willow, creating a dome of foliage. A very fast growing cultivar, trees grown at Germantown, Philadelphia were reputed to gain 6 m (20 ft) per annum.[3] Klehm's top-grafted it at about 8 ft.

Pests and diseases[edit]

No specific information available, but the species as a whole is highly susceptible to Dutch Elm Disease and Elm Yellows; it is also moderately preferred for feeding and reproduction by the adult Elm Leaf Beetle Xanthogaleruca luteola [4], and highly preferred for feeding by the Japanese Beetle Popillia japonica [5] [6] in the United States. U. americana is also the most susceptible of all the elms to verticillium wilt.[7]

Cultivation[edit]

A few specimens are known to survive in the United States, mostly in Illinois where the cultivar originated.

Notable trees[edit]

A curious 'table top' elm growing in the center of Provo, Utah, planted in 1927, may be an example of the cultivar [1].

Etymology[edit]

Named for Mr. E. Beebe, discoverer of the tree.

Accessions[edit]

North America[edit]

Synonymy[edit]

  • Ulmus fulva pendula: Meehan, Garden & Forest 2: 286, 1889.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Green, Peter Shaw (1964). "Registration of cultivar names in Ulmus". Arnoldia. Arnold Arboretum, Harvard University. 24 (6–8): 41–80. Retrieved 16 February 2017.
  2. ^ Klehm's Nurseries, Season of 1910, Arlington Heights, Illinois, 1910, p.12
  3. ^ Meehan, (1889), in Garden & Forest, 2: 286, 1889.
  4. ^ Miller, Fredric; Ware, George (2001-02-01). "Resistance of Temperate Chinese Elms (Ulmus spp.) to Feeding by the Adult Elm Leaf Beetle (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae)". Journal of Economic Entomology. Oxford University Press (OUP). 94 (1): 162–166. doi:10.1603/0022-0493-94.1.162. ISSN 0022-0493.
  5. ^ Miller, Fredric; Ware, George; Jackson, Jennifer (2001-04-01). "Preference of Temperate Chinese Elms ( Ulmus spp.) for the Adult Japanese Beetle (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae)". Journal of Economic Entomology. Oxford University Press (OUP). 94 (2): 445–448. doi:10.1603/0022-0493-94.2.445. ISSN 0022-0493.
  6. ^ "Elm Leaf Beetle Survey". Archived from the original on 2011-07-19. Retrieved 17 July 2017.
  7. ^ Pegg, G. F. & Brady, B. L. (2002). Verticillium Wilts. CABI Publishing. ISBN 0-85199-529-2