Umhausen

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Umhausen
Umhausen.jpg
Coat of arms of Umhausen
Coat of arms
Location of Umhausen
Umhausen is located in Austria
Umhausen
Umhausen
Location within Austria
Location in the district

Umhausen im Bezirk IM.png

Coordinates: 47°07′00″N 10°55′00″E / 47.11667°N 10.91667°E / 47.11667; 10.91667Coordinates: 47°07′00″N 10°55′00″E / 47.11667°N 10.91667°E / 47.11667; 10.91667
CountryAustria
StateTyrol
DistrictImst
Government
 • MayorMag. Jakob Wolf
Area
 • Total137.4 km2 (53.1 sq mi)
Elevation
1,031 m (3,383 ft)
Population
(1 January 2016)[1]
 • Total3,174
 • Density23/km2 (60/sq mi)
Time zoneUTC+1 (CET)
 • Summer (DST)UTC+2 (CEST)
Postal code
6441
Area code05255
Vehicle registrationIM
Websitehttp://www.umhausen.com
Stuiben - waterfall

Umhausen is a municipality in the Imst district and is located 17 km southeast of Imst at the Ötztaler Ache in the Ötztal. It has 3078 inhabitants.[citation needed]

Geography[edit]

The municipality consists of six villages:[citation needed]

  • Umhausen
  • Tumpen
  • Köfels
  • Farst
  • Niederthai
  • Östen


Umhausen is located at the intersection of the Stubai Alps and the Ötztal Alps. The lowest point is in Tumpen (920m), the highest peak of the municipality is the Strahlkogel, at 3,288 m (AA). Its name comes from its great, white, light-reflecting, quartz layers, which allegedly cause the mountain to "radiate" (strahlen). It has the shape of a well-proportioned, steep and pointed pyramid. Ascending the Strahlkogel is difficult and it is thus only rarely visited, unlike the neighbouring 3,287-metre-high Breiter Grieskogel.

The Strahlkogel seen from the Breiter Grieskogel. The great bands of quartz on the south face are clearly visible.

Economy[edit]

Umhausen was once[when?] a centre for cultivation of flax.[citation needed]

Today the main source of income is tourism. In the area of the community lies the tallest waterfall of Tyrol at 150 metres of height.[citation needed]

Landslide[edit]

The Köfels landslide was a gigantic landslide, known as a sturzstrom, that occurred in the Ötz valley approximately 9800±100 years ago according to radiocarbon dating of trees buried by the event.[2] It involved a 2.5 km horizontal displacement and 800 m vertical displacement of 3.2 km3 of rock and mud along the Ötz valley floor, making it the third largest known sturzstrom.[3][4]

The British rocket engineer Alan Bond linked this geological evidence to Sumerian astronomical observations and hypothesised an asteroid impact as its cause.[5]

Population[edit]

Historical population
YearPop.±%
18691,341—    
18801,366+1.9%
18901,186−13.2%
19001,175−0.9%
19101,318+12.2%
19231,368+3.8%
19341,485+8.6%
19391,528+2.9%
19511,724+12.8%
19611,834+6.4%
19712,050+11.8%
19812,298+12.1%
19912,506+9.1%
20012,830+12.9%
20113,078+8.8%

Hedwig von Trapp / The Sound of Music[edit]

Farst. Hedwig von Trapp worked here as a teacher in the 1960s

Hedwig von Trapp, member of the Trapp family, lived and worked after the dissolution of the family choir in Farst, above Umhausen. This workplace, located at 1470 meter above sea level was designed to alleviate the asthma-related Hedwig von Trapp. Hedwig von Trapp was known from the film and musical The Sound of Music, in this film the experiences of the Trapp family have been filmed. Hedwig von Trapp was portrayed by the character "Brigitta" in the film. The school, Hedwig von Trapp worked, is still in its original condition.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Statistik Austria - Bevölkerung zu Jahresbeginn 2002-2016 nach Gemeinden (Gebietsstand 1.1.2016) for Umhausen.
  2. ^ Ivy-Ochs S, Heuberger H, Kubik PW, Kerschner H, Bonani G, Frank M, and Schlüchter C. (1998). The age of the Köfels event — relative, 14C, and cosmogenic isotope dating of an early Holocene landslide in the central Alps (Tyrol, Austria). Zeitschrift für Gletscherkunde und Glazialgeologie, (34):57–70.
  3. ^ Sørensena, SA and Bauer, B (15 August 2003). On the dynamics of the Köfels sturzstrom. Geomorphology, 54(1–2):11–19.
  4. ^ Prager C, Zangerl C, Patzelt G, and Brandner R (2008). Age distribution of fossil landslides in the Tyrol (Austria) and its surrounding areas. Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences, 8:377–407.
  5. ^ Bond, A.; Hempsell, M. (2008). A Sumerian Observation of the Köfels' Impact Event. London, UK: WritersPrintshop. ISBN 1-904623-64-6.

External links[edit]