Undercover Blues

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Undercover Blues
Undercover blues.jpg
Theatrical release poster
Directed byHerbert Ross
Produced byMike Lobell
Written byIan Abrams
Starring
Music byDavid Newman
CinematographyDonald E. Thorin
Edited byPriscilla Nedd-Friendly
Distributed byMetro Goldwyn Mayer
Release date
  • September 10, 1993 (1993-09-10)
Running time
89 minutes
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish
Budget$25 million
Box office$12,324,660

Undercover Blues is a 1993 comedy film about a family of secret agents written by Ian Abrams and directed by Herbert Ross and starring Kathleen Turner and Dennis Quaid.[1]

Plot[edit]

Turner and Quaid play Jane and Jefferson Blue, a wise-cracking couple of spies for an unnamed U.S. covert organization on maternity leave in New Orleans with their baby daughter whom they dote on, though they are unable to agree on whether her name should be Louise Jane or Jane Louise. With the baby's arrival, they have decided to move on to "Chapter Two" of their marriage, retiring from field assignment in an attempt to give their daughter a normal life. However, events continually conspire to draw them back into their old lives, including fruitless attacks by a frustrated mugger (played by Stanley Tucci) while being called back into service to combat a psychotic Czech arms dealer (played by Fiona Shaw).

Reception[edit]

Undercover Blues received mixed to negative reviews from critics, as the film holds a 35% rating on Rotten Tomatoes.[2]

Jane Horwitz felt in her review for The Washington Post that "Dennis Quaid and Kathleen Turner act so darn cute in "Undercover Blues" that they risk fallen archness. It's kind of fun to watch them dance around on tiptoe instead of creating real characters, but one can't help wondering what the whole enterprise would have been like with a director who knew how to make them play against the material a little."[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Undercover Blues (1993) Review/Film; A Loving Pair of Spies Take Baby to Work". The New York Times. 2011-12-30.
  2. ^ "Undercover Blues". Rotten Tomatoes. Retrieved 2017-10-11.
  3. ^ "Undercover Blues - Review by Jane Horwitz". Washington Post. September 10, 1993. Retrieved 2017-10-11.

External links[edit]