Gymnophthalmus underwoodi

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Gymnophthalmus underwoodi
Scientific classification e
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Reptilia
Order: Squamata
Family: Gymnophthalmidae
Genus: Gymnophthalmus
Species: G. underwoodi
Binomial name
Gymnophthalmus underwoodi
Grant, 1958

Gymnophthalmus underwoodi, called commonly Underwood's spectacled tegu, is a species of microteiid lizard, which is found in South America and on certain Caribbean islands.

Etymology[edit]

G. underwoodi is named after British herpetologist Garth Leon Underwood.[1]

Reproduction[edit]

G. underwoodi is a unisexual species, reproducing through parthenogenesis. Captive specimens have been recorded laying up to eleven eggs within four months, with between one and four eggs per clutch.

Geographic range[edit]

The geographic distribution of G. underwoodi includes the islands of Guadeloupe, Martinique, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Barbados, Antigua, Barbuda, Trinidad, and Tobago in the Lesser Antilles; and Guyana, Suriname, Colombia, and Venezuela in South America. It is also present on Dominica, which has been confirmed by both Breuil and Turk.

Sources[edit]

  • Breuil, M. (2002). Histoire naturelle des amphibiens et reptiles terrestres de l’Archipel Guadeloupéen. Guadeloupe, Saint-Martin, Saint-Barthélem. 54. Patrimoines Naturels. pp. 1–339. 
  • Malhotra, Anita; Thorpe, Roger S. (1999). Reptiles & Amphibians of the Eastern Caribbean. Macmillan Education Ltd. pp. 34, 70, 83–84, 97, 101, 104. ISBN 0-333-69141-5. 

References[edit]

  1. ^ Beolens, Bo; Watkins, Michael; Grayson, Michael (2011). The Eponym Dictionary of Reptiles. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press. xiii + 296 pp. ISBN 978-1-4214-0135-5. (Gymnophthalmus underwoodi, p. 270).

External links[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • Grant C (1958). "A New Gymnophthalmus (Reptilia, Teiidae) from Barbados, B.W.I." Herpetologica 14 (4): 227-228. (Gymnophthalmus underwoodi, new species).