Union Trust Building (Washington, D.C.)

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Union Trust Building
American Bar Association Washington DC.JPG
Union Trust Building (Washington, D.C.) is located in Central Washington, D.C.
Union Trust Building (Washington, D.C.)
Union Trust Building (Washington, D.C.) is located in the District of Columbia
Union Trust Building (Washington, D.C.)
Union Trust Building (Washington, D.C.) is located in the United States
Union Trust Building (Washington, D.C.)
Location740 15th Street, N.W., Washington, D. C.
Coordinates38°53′59″N 77°2′2″W / 38.89972°N 77.03389°W / 38.89972; -77.03389Coordinates: 38°53′59″N 77°2′2″W / 38.89972°N 77.03389°W / 38.89972; -77.03389
Architectural styleNeoclassical
NRHP reference #84000867 [1]

The Union Trust Building is a historic building, located at 740 15th Street, Northwest, Washington, D.C.

The building is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, and is a contributing property to the 15th Street Financial Historic District. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

In 1906 Waddy Butler Wood and the Wood, Donn & Deming became the first Washington, D.C. architectural firm to design a bank high-rise in their city when they designed the Union Trust Building, now home to the New America Foundation and Joe's, the DC location of a high end steak and seafood chain. The building is also listed on the National Register of Historic Places. In the past, the city's largest banks had each retained nationally renowned architects while local architects were only chosen to design bank branches or remodel existing buildings. By choosing Wood's firm, Union Trust began a trend of the city's banks choosing local architects to design their buildings.

Wood's partnership with Donn and Deming is best known for the firm's work in 1907 on the Masonic temple located at the intersection of 13th Street, H Street, and New York Avenue NW, which is now the National Museum of Women in the Arts.

Tenants have included Covington & Burling, which had its offices in the Old Union Trust Building in 1940, when Gerhard Gesell joined the firm (according to his 1984 unpublished memoir).[2]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ National Park Service (2010-07-09). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service.
  2. ^ Gesell, Gerhard A. (August 1984). My 'Jealous Mistress': 1932–1984 (PDF). (unpublished memoir). p. 32. Retrieved 29 October 2017.

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