Union for the Defense of Tradesmen and Artisans

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Lapel pin for the Union for the Defense of Tradesmen and Artisans.

The Union for the Defense of Tradesmen and Artisans (French: Union de défense des commerçants et artisans) was a French political movement from 1953 to 1962.

History[edit]

The Union for the Defense of Tradesmen and Artisans was founded in 1953 by Pierre Poujade.[1][2] It published a newspaper, Fraternité française.[3] It also had a hymn, written by André Montagard in 1955.[4]

Poujade recruited up to 800,000 members.[5] In 1956, 2.5 million French people voted for them, electing 42 new members of the National Assembly.[1] In the assembly, they were called the Union et fraternité françaises.[1]

The movement initially promoted the repeal of taxes for small business owners.[3] By 1958, they were strongly opposed to Charles de Gaulle's policy of decolonisation in French Algeria.[3]

The Union dissolved in 1962, due to infighting.[1][3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "U.D.C.A." Larousse. Retrieved July 7, 2016. 
  2. ^ "Union de défense des commerçants et artisans. France". Bibliothèque nationale de France. Retrieved July 7, 2016. 
  3. ^ a b c d Souillac, Romain (2007). De la défense professionnelle au populisme nationaliste (1953-1962). Paris: Presses de Sciences Po. pp. 339–365. ISBN 9782724610062 – via Cairn.info. (Registration required (help)). 
  4. ^ Souillac, Romain (2007). Le mouvement Poujade : De la défense professionnelle au populisme nationaliste (1953-1962). Paris: Presses de Sciences Po. pp. 127–142. ISBN 9782724610062 – via Cairn.info. (Registration required (help)). 
  5. ^ "Union for the Defense of Tradesmen and Artisans". Encyclopædia Britannica. Retrieved July 7, 2016.