United Aircraft Corporation

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PJSC United Aircraft Corporation
Native name
Russian: OAO Объединённая Авиастроительная Корпорация
Formerly called
OJSC United Aircraft Corporation (2006–2015)
Public, PJSC
Traded as MCXUNAC
Industry Aerospace, Defense
Predecessor Ilyushin, Irkut, Mikoyan, Sukhoi, Tupolev, Yakovlev
Founded February 20, 2006; 11 years ago (2006-02-20)
Founder Vladimir Putin in a presidential decree
Headquarters Krasnoselsky District, Moscow, Central, Russia
Area served
Worldwide
Key people
Denis Manturov (Chairman)[1]
Yuri Slyusar (President)[2]
Products Airliners (see list)
Cargo aircraft (see list)
Special-purposed aircraft (see list)
Military aircraft (see list)
Revenue Increase 417 billion[3] (2016)
Increase 9.57 billion[4] (2016)
Increase -3.83 billion[5] (2016)
Total assets Increase 983 billion[6] (2016)
Total equity Decrease 155 billion[7] (2016)
Owner

As of August 2017:

Federal Agency for State Property Management (91.7%)[8]
Free float (4%)[9]
Number of employees
100,000[10]
Divisions UAC Health
UAC - Transport Aircraft
LLC UAC - Aggregation Center
Subsidiaries see organization
Website www.uacrussia.ru

The PJSC United Aircraft Corporation (UAC) (Russian: Объединённая авиастроительная корпорация, tr. Obyedinyonnaya Aviastroitelnaya Korporatsiya (OAK)) is a Russian aerospace and defense corporation. With a majority stake belonging to the Russian Government, it consolidates Russian private and state-owned aircraft manufacturing companies and assets engaged in the manufacture, design and sale of military, civilian, transport, and unmanned aircraft. Its headquarters are in Krasnoselsky District, Central Administrative Okrug, Moscow.[11]

The United Aircraft Corporation has been described as one of the so-called national champions, large companies that are expected not only to seek profit but also to advance the interests of the nation. Many of the corporation's assets are located in various regions in Russia, with joint-ventures with foreign partners in India and China.[12]

History[edit]

Predecessor[edit]

After the Soviet Union's collapse in 1991, the aerospace industry of Russia was in catastrophic turmoil. An excessive amount of imports and highly protective tariffs devastated the manufacturing industry, both the aerospace and the automotive industry.[13] The military aircraft industry was able to benefit from improving export possibilities by profiting from a large storage of components and parts from Soviet times, while the civilian aircraft industry suffered losses and production of civilian aircraft diminished. For example, in 1990, Russia produced 715 aircraft. 8 years later, that number decreased by 661 to only 56 aircraft. In 2000, only 4 civilian aircraft were produced.[14] In order to solve this, the president of Russia at that time, Boris Yeltsin, decided that consolidation was necessary, and created the VPK-MAPO (Military Industrial Complex – Moscow Aircraft Production Association), which includes companies such as Mikoyan. The consolidation wasn't successful and MAPO later merged with Sukhoi.[15]

First Years[edit]

The UAC was created in February 20, 2006 by Russian President Vladimir Putin in Presidential Decree No. 140 by merging shares from Ilyushin, Irkut, Mikoyan, Sukhoi, Tupolev, and Yakovlev as a new joint-stock company named the OJSC United Aircraft Corporation in order to optimize production and minimize losses. The UAC stated the reason why the corporation was created was to protect and develop the scientific and industrial potential of the Russian aircraft industry, the security and defense of the state, and the concentration of intellectual, industrial, and financial resources to implement long-term aviation programs.[16] The United Aircraft Corporation started out producing the Tupolev Tu-154 "Careless", the Tupolev Tu-204, the Ilyushin Il-86 "Camber", the Ilyushin Il-96, the Ilyushin Il-114, and all of Mikoyan, Sukhoi, Yakovlev, Tupolev, and Ilyushin military aircraft; all created prior to the corporation's creation.

The Mikoyan MiG-35 is the first aircraft and first military aircraft to be developed under the UAC brand, since Mikoyan is a branch of the corporation.

In February 2007, the UAC presented its first aircraft and the first military aircraft designed and exported under the UAC brand, the Mikoyan MiG-35, designated by NATO as "Fulcrum-F" and a Generation 4++ jet fighter by Mikoyan.[17] The MiG-35 was officially presented during the Aero India 2007 air show in Bangalore, India and officially unveiled when the Russian Minister of Defense, Sergei Ivanov, visited the Lukhovitsky Machine Building Plant "MAPO-MIG".[18] The MiG-35 was a contender for its fourth generation counterparts in the Indian MRCA competition but was taken out of the competition in April 2011.[19] The MiG-35 would be adopted by the Russian Air Force and is planned to be introduced in 2018.[17]

In October 2007, the Federal Financial Markets Service registered a primary issue of common shares for the United Aircraft Building Corporation. The issue included 96,724,000,000 shares priced at 1 RUB (US$0.04).[20] In December 2007, the second largest (and state-owned) Russian bank Vneshtorgbank (VTB) announced that it would sell its 5% share in EADS to UAC at market price.[21] Later that month VTB sold its share in EADS to the state-owned Russian Development Bank (VEB).[22] EADS already owns a 10% stake in Irkut which it plans to convert into UAC shares,[23] leading to EADS and UAC owning shares of each other. They also announced plans for a possible 10–15% share issue in 2008, planning to retain a 75% stake.[24] Currently, after placing 5 additional share issues, the Corporation's chartered capital amounts to 174.61 bln. RUB. The share of the Russian Federation in UAC’s chartered capital is 80.29%.

In February 2008, the UAC brought out an improved version of the Sukhoi Su-27, the Sukhoi Su-35S, also erroneously named as the Su-35BM by the media, which was to serve as upcoming Sukhoi PAK FA, Russia's first fifth generation jet fighter. This is the second modernized version of the Su-27, where the first modernized version took place back in June 28, 1988, designated as the Sukhoi Su-27M, also known as the Su-35. The improved aircraft includes a reinforced airframe, air-thrusted engines, radar, and improved avionics, while excluding canards and an air brake. The Russian Air Force bought 98 units and designated them as the Su-35S, and the Su-35S was marketed to many countries. Sukhoi thought sales of the Su-35S would go over 160 but they are blunted by updated versions of the Sukhoi Su-30.[25]

The Sukhoi Superjet 100 is the first airliner to be developed under the UAC brand, since Sukhoi Civil Aircraft is a branch of the corporation.

In May 2008, the UAC presented its third aircraft and the first airliner designed and exported under the UAC brand, the Sukhoi Superjet 100 (SSJ 100). The SSJ 100 is the fourth civilian aircraft and the first airliner to be made by Sukhoi. Before, Sukhoi and Boeing made a cooperation agreement and where Boeing consultants would help and advise Sukhoi on the airliner.[26] The SSJ 100 was introduced in April 21, 2011, with Armavia. The Sukhoi Superjet 100 was later described as the most important and the most successful airliner program of the Russian aerospace industry,[27] and is regarded by the Ministry of Industry and Trade as a top priority project.[28] Sukhoi Holdings of the UAC signed a joint venture with Leonardo-Finmeccanica (now Leonardo S.p.A) to establish Superjet International in order to sell the SSJ 100 to potential customers.

In October 2009, the UAC signed a joint venture with Hindustan Aeronautics Limited (HAL) of India named the Multirole Transport Aircraft Limited (MTAL) where the two companies would be cooperating on making aircraft for both of the Russian Armed Forces, the Indian Armed Forces, and friendly third-party countries.[29] One of the projects being developed by the joint-venture is the Ilyushin Il-214 Multirole Transport Aircraft (MTA) which was intended to replace India's Antonov An-32 transport fleet. The Il-214 would perform regular transport duties as well as deploying paratroopers. The aircraft is planned to be revealed in 2017 and planned to be introduced in 2018.[30]

In 2009, UAC delivered 90 aircraft, including 17 passenger models. This figure includes 31 MiG-29 and two Su-34 fighter jets produced for the Russian Air Force. The company's revenues for 2009 were expected to be 115 billion–120 billion rubles.[31]

The Sukhoi Su-57 PAK FA (T-50) would be Russia's first fifth generation jet fighter, and is developed by Sukhoi, a branch of the corporation.

2010s[edit]

In January 29, 2010, Sukhoi and the UAC revealed Russia's first fifth generation jet fighter, the Sukhoi PAK FA (T-50). The PAK FA is a stealth, single-seat, twin-engine, multirole jet fighter designed for air supremacy and attack roles. The PAK FA would also be Russia's first aircraft to use stealth technology. The PAK FA is designed to replace the Mikoyan MiG-29 and the Sukhoi Su-27 and is expected to be introduced to the Russian Air Force in 2019.[32][33][34] Also, under the MTAL joint venture, Sukhoi and HAL would co-develop the Sukhoi/HAL FGFA, now known as the Perspective Multirole Fighter (PMF), a variant of the PAK FA, of which would be designed for the Indian Air Force.[35][36] In August 11, 2017, the Russian Air Force has designated the Sukhoi PAK FA as the Sukhoi Su-57.[37]

In October 27, 2010, the UAC and the Ukrainian state-owned aircraft corporation, Antonov, signed a joint venture contract, LLC UAC - Antonov, in the capital city of Ukraine, Kiev. The purpose of the joint-venture was to deal with the coordination of Antonov and the UAC on purchasing spare parts, production, marketing and sales, as well as servicing and joint creation of new modifications of Antonov aircraft, according to Defense-Aerospace.[38]

In 2013, nine aircraft repair plants of the Ministry of Defense was transferred under the ownership of the UAC. As a result, in 2014, the serviceability of the Russian Air Force increased from 40% to 65%.[16]

As a result of Russian intervention in Ukraine in 2014, sanctions were put against Russia, and because the UAC was part of Russia's aerospace and defense industry, it was sanctioned as well by the European Union.[39] However though, since the sanctions did not include the airliner industry of the UAC, such as the Sukhoi Superjet 100, exports of the regional jet to Western nations and economical activities of Superjet International will not be affected.[40]

In April 2015, the company changed its full name to Public Joint-Stock Company (PJSC) "United Aircraft Corporation" (UAC).[16] In 2011-2015, UAC companies delivered to the Russian Defence Ministry more than 200 aircraft.[41]

In September 18, 2015, according to the resolution of the Ukrainian government, the Ukrainian state-owned corporation, Antonov, would be exiting the LLC UAC - Antonov joint venture between the two companies.[38]

In January 13, 2016, India's HAL announced it would not be involved in the Ilyushin Il-214 MTA project anymore, and that Ilyushin would have to work on the project alone. The project is now designated as the "Ilyushin Il-214" with the MTA taken out since the project is no longer under the Multirole Transport Aircraft Limited joint-venture.[42][43]

In June 25, 2016, the UAC and the Chinese aircraft corporation, Comac, signed a joint venture contract, China-Russia Aircraft International Co, Ltd. (CRAIC), based in Shanghai. According to the UAC, CRAIC is responsible for product and technology development, manufacturing, marketing, sales and customer service, consulting, program management and other related field. The two companies are now cooperating in creating a new generation long range wide body commercial aircraft and to take charge of its operation under the joint-venture.[44]

In September 1, 2017, the UAC Board of Directors, and UAC's subsidiaries, Sukhoi Civil Aircraft and the Irkut Corporation made an agreement to merge the civil industry Irkut Corporation and the Sukhoi Civil Aircraft into a Civil Aviation Division on the basis of Irkut Corporation. In accordance with the decisions taken, In turn, Sukhoi will become the financial basis of all civil aircraft produced by UAC. According to the UAC, vorporate transformations are aimed to realize UAC’s strategic goal to increase the share of civil products in its portfolio to 45% by 2035 and to drive annual civil aircraft production to 100-120 aircraft per year, as well as to increase UAC’s economic effectiveness and lower costs by centralizing supporting processes and decreasing levels of management. The transformation will allow to concentrate resources to develop, manufacture and market Russian civil aircraft, it will also ensure consistency in these areas and simplify certification and licensing procedures.[45]

Organization[edit]

Company structure:[46]

Aircraft Manufacturers[edit]

Divisions[edit]

  • UAC Health
  • UAC - Transport Aircraft
  • LLC UAC - Aggregation Center

Financial & Business[edit]

  • Finance Leasing Company
  • Ilyushin Finance Co.
  • LLC UAC - Purchases
  • Sukhoi Holdings

Joint Ventures[edit]

Material Providers[edit]

Others[edit]

Products[edit]

This section contains present and future products to be distributed under UAC umbrella[48]

Airliners[edit]

The United Aircraft Corporation started out producing the Tupolev Tu-154 "Careless", the Tupolev Tu-204, the Ilyushin Il-86 "Camber", the Ilyushin Il-96, and the Ilyushin Il-114; all created prior to the corporation's creation. The Tupolev Tu-154 is a medium-range, narrow-body, three-engine jet airliner developed and introduced in Soviet times. It saw large use in Aeroflot and was exported to many nations that had connections to the Soviet Union, and a total of 1,026 aircraft were built. Production of the Tu-154 stopped in 2013.[49] Following a crash in 2016, all Russian Tu-154s, were grounded,[50] and now the airliner is in limited service by a few airline companies and military. The Ilyushin Il-86 is a short/medium-range, wide-body jet airliner, developed and introduced in Soviet times as well. The Ilyushin Il-86 was the first Soviet wide-body airliner and the world's second four-engine wide-body airliner developed. The Il-86 was praised for its safety and reliability,[51] but only 106 were built, as a result of many delays during development. Production of the airliner stopped in 1995, and the airliner was retired in 2011, with only four in service in the Russian Air Force.[52] The Ilyushin Il-96 is a shortened, long-ranged successor of the Il-86, with updated technologies, and the first airliner from the Russian Federation to be introduced. Only 30 were built however,[53][54] and the airliner is in low-rate production and used by only a few airlines. The Il-96's purpose as an airliner ended in 2009, as it is deemed inferior to its Boeing and Airbus counterparts.[55] The Tupolev Tu-204 is a medium-range, narrow-body, jet airliner, featuring many technological innovations such as a fly-by-wire control system, a glass cockpit, etc., and was developed primarily for Aeroflot. The Tu-204 was succeeded by its variant, the Tu-214. The Ilyushin Il-114 is a turboprop, narrow-body regional airliner developed to replace the Antonov An-24, which most were in service of Aeroflot. However, only 20 were built so far, and only two airlines were using it, so the Il-114's production was temporarily ceased.

The Sukhoi Superjet 100 is the first airliner and regional jet airliner that is developed and exported under the UAC brand, by which it was developed by Sukhoi Civil Aircraft, a branch of the UAC. The Sukhoi Superjet 100 was designed to compete with the Antonov An-148, Embraer E-Jet, and the Bombardier CSeries, and to replace the aging Tupolev Tu-134 and the Yakovlev Yak-42 jet airliners,[56] claimed by Sukhoi to have a lower purchase and operating cost. The Sukhoi Superjet 100 was later described as the most important and the most successful airliner program of the Russian aerospace industry,[27] and is regarded by the Ministry of Industry and Trade as a top priority project.[28] The Irkut MC-21 is currently the newest jet airliner developed under the UAC brand, of which it is developed by the Irkut Corporation, a brand of the UAC. The goal of the MC-21 is to replace the Tupolev Tu-154, Tupolev Tu-134, Tupolev Tu-204, and the Yakovlev Yak-42. and to compete with the Airbus A320neo and the Boeing B737 MAX.[57] Despite the domination of the airliner market by Boeing and Airbus as well as Russian protectionism preventing western companies to supply the program,[58][59] the MC-21 was able to have its maiden flight, have 3 prototypes built and another 3 in assembly, and getting a total of 366 orders as of July 24, 2017, with an introduction planned in 2019 with Aeroflot. The Sukhoi Superjet 130 is currently being developed by Sukhoi Civil Aircraft, intending to bridge the gap between the Superjet Stretch and the MC-21.[60] The Ilyushin Il-114's production and development continued as the Ilyushin Il-114-300, now restarted with all-Russian parts with a maiden flight planned in 2019 and an introduction planned in 2021.[61][62]

List of airliners of UAC
Aircraft Type Description Developer Seats Number Built Maiden Flight Introduction Production Ceased Retired
Tupolev Tu-154 "Careless" Jet airliner narrow-body, trijet Tupolev 164 1,026 October 4, 1968 February 7, 1972, with Aeroflot 2013 -
Ilyushin Il-86 "Camber" Jet airliner wide-body, four engines Ilyushin Aviation Complex 359 106 December 22, 1976 1980, with Aeroflot 1995 2011 (as an airliner)
Ilyushin Il-96 Jet airliner wide-body, four engines Ilyushin Aviation Complex 262 30 September 28, 1988 December 29, 1992, with Aeroflot In low-rate production after 2009 -
Tupolev Tu-204 Jet airliner narrow-body, twinjet Tupolev 210 82 January 2, 1989 1995, with Aeroflot - -
Ilyushin Il-114 Regional Airliner turboprop, two engines Ilyushin Aviation Complex 64 20 March 29, 1990 August 1998, with Uzbekistan Airways July 2012, production continued with Ilyushin Il-114-300 -
Sukhoi Superjet 100 Regional Jet Airliner narrow-body, twinjet Sukhoi Civil Aircraft 87 135 May 19, 2008 April 21, 2011, with Armavia - -
Irkut MC-21 Jet airliner narrow-body, twinjet Irkut Corporation 163 3 prototypes, 3 under assembly May 28, 2017 2019, with Aeroflot (planned) - -
Sukhoi Superjet 130 Regional Jet Airliner narrow-body, twinjet Sukhoi Civil Aircraft 120 0 - Planned in 2020 - -
Ilyushin Il-114-300 Regional Airliner turboprop, two engines Ilyushin Aviation Complex 52 0 Planned in 2019 Planned in 2021 - -
Tupolev Tu-204C under service of the DHL Aviation and operated by Aviostar-TU

Cargo[edit]

The United Aircraft Corporation started out producing the Ilyushin Il-96-400T and the Tupolev Tu-204C, both cargo variants of their airliner counterparts, and the Sukhoi Su-80, a twin-turboprop, twin-boom STOL aircraft. The Il-96-400T is a freight version of the Il-96-400, which features Russian avionics and engines and carries more room than the standard Il-96. The Sukhoi Su-80 can be used for both civilian and military purposes and has sleek hull which can provide space for 30 passengers and a "beaver-tail" ramp that can help unload cargo easier. The Su-80 was made by Sukhoi Civil Aircraft to replace the Antonov An-24/26, the Antonov An-28, and the Yakovlev Yak-40, and to compete with the Antonov An-38.

The Ilyushin Il-214 was formerly a project designated as the "Ilyushin Il-214 Multirole Transport Aircraft" under the joint-venture between the UAC and HAL. The project was first conceived in 2007, two to three years before the joint-venture, "Multirole Transport Aircraft Ltd." between the two state corporations were created, and development begun in 2012. However, the team under Ilyushin Aviation Complex, a branch of the UAC, and the team under HAL had many disagreements and misunderstandings. In January 2016, Ilyushin halted the project, and HAL announced it would not be involved in the Ilyushin Il-214 MTA project anymore, and that Ilyushin would have to work on the project alone. The project is now designated as the "Ilyushin Il-214" with the MTA taken out since the project is no longer under the Multirole Transport Aircraft Ltd. joint-venture.[42][43]

The Ilyushin Il-112 is a high-wing, light, military transport aircraft based on the Ilyushin Il-114 currently being developed by Ilyushin Aviation Complex for air landing and airdrop.[63] Development of the aircraft started before 2011, the year of which the maiden flight of the Ilyushin Il-112 is supposed to occur. The project was later abandoned in May 2011 by the Russian Ministry of Defense and seven Antonov An-140T were purchased.[64] The project was later continued in January 2013 and a maiden flight would be planned in 2017.[65][66]

List of Cargo Aircraft of UAC
Aircraft Type Description Developer Number Built Maiden Flight
Ilyushin Il-96-400T transport aircraft four engines Ilyushin Aviation Complex - September 28, 1988 (as standard Ilyushin Il-96)
Tupolev Tu-204C transport aircraft twinjet Tupolev 7 January 2, 1989 (as standard Tupolev Tu-204)
Sukhoi Su-80 STOL transport aircraft twin-turboprop, twin-boom Sukhoi Civil Aircraft 8 September 4, 2001
Ilyushin Il-214 military transport aircraft medium air-lift Ilyushin Aviation Complex, Hindustan Aeronautics Limited (formerly) 0 Planned in 2017
Ilyushin Il-112 light military transport turboprop, two engines, high-wing Ilyushin Aviation Complex 0 Planned in 2017

Special purposes[edit]

The Beriev Aircraft Company is a branch of the UAC that specializes in special purposed and amphibious aircraft. The Beriev Be-200 "Altair", based on the Beriev A-40 "Albatross", was designed prior to the UAC's creation, and is a multi-purposed amphibious aircraft. The Be-200 is marketed as a firefighter, search and rescue aircraft, maritime patrol aircraft, cargo aircraft, and an airliner.[67] The Beriev A-100 is a airborne early warning and control aircraft designed to replace the Beriev A-50, also made by Beriev. Its maiden flight was in October 26, 2016, with an introduction with the Russian Air Force. The A-100 is developed from the Ilyushin Il-476 with avionics and configuration being similar to the A-50U as well as a new active phased array radar made by JSC Vega.[68]

List of Special Purposed Aircraft of UAC
Aircraft Type Description Developer Number Built Maiden Flight Introduction
Beriev Be-200 "Altair" multirole amphibian twin-seat Beriev 10 September 24, 1998 2003
Beriev A-100 airborne early warning and control four engines, turbofan Beriev 1 October 26, 2016 -
The Su-35S, Su-34, and the Su-57 PAK FA, both designed by the Sukhoi Design Bureau, a branch of the UAC

Military[edit]

Most of the military aircraft produced by the UAC are designed prior to the corporation's creation, many of them designed in the Soviet era. Jet fighters such as the Sukhoi Su-25 "Grach", Sukhoi Su-27 "Sofiyka", Mikoyan MiG-29, Sukhoi Su-33, Sukhoi Su-30, and the Sukhoi Su-34, and large military aircraft such as the Ilyushin Il-76, Tupolev Tu-160 "Beliy Lebed", and the Ilyushin Il-78, were all designed in the Soviet Union. However though, some Soviet aircraft such as the Tupolev Tu-160 "Beliy Lebed", Sukhoi Su-33, Sukhoi Su-30, and the Sukhoi Su-34, were introduced later in the Russian Federation, the Soviet Union's successor. The Yakovlev Yak-130 is the only aircraft to be developed after the Soviet era and before the creation of the UAC.

The Mikoyan MiG-35 is the first aircraft and the first military aircraft designed and exported under the UAC brand, as Mikoyan, the company that designed it, is a branch of the corporation.[17] The MiG-35 was a contender for its fourth generation counterparts in the Indian MRCA competition but was taken out of the competition in April 2011.[19] The MiG-35 would be adopted by the Russian Air Force and is planned to be introduced in 2018.[17] The Sukhoi Su-35S, the UAC's second military aircraft, is designed by the Sukhoi Design Bureau, a branch of the UAC. The aircraft is to serve as the interim for the Sukhoi PAK FA, Russia's first fifth-generation jet fighter. Sukhoi expected to export more than 160 units of the Su-35S, but sales were halted due to updated versions of the Su-30, another jet fighter made by Sukhoi.[25] The Sukhoi PAK FA, designated by the Russian Air Force as the Sukhoi Su-57,[37] under the Prospective Airborne Complex (PAK) platform, would be the first Russian aircraft to use stealth technology, as well as being Russia's first fifth-generation jet fighter, as stated before. The Sukhoi Su-57 would replace the aging Sukhoi Su-27 and the Mikoyan MiG-29 in the Russian Air Force with an introduction planned in 2019.[69][70] Other aircraft being developed under the PAK platform are the Ilyushin PAK TA, a supersonic transport aircraft, the Tupolev PAK DA, a strategic bomber, the Sukhoi PAK ShA, a close air support aircraft designed to replace the Sukhoi Su-25, and the Mikoyan PAK DP, a new fast interceptor aircraft. Military aircraft that are not under the PAK platform and are under development are the Mikoyan MiG-41 and the Mikoyan LMFS.

All of the aircraft listed were either put into or going into service in the Russian Air Force.

List of Military Aircraft of UAC
Aircraft NATO Designation Name Type Description Developer Number Built Maiden Flight Introduction
Ilyushin Il-76 Candid strategic airlifter four engines, turbofan Ilyushin Aviation Complex 960 March 25, 1971 June 1974
Sukhoi Su-25 "Grach" Frogfoot close air support twinjet, single-seat Sukhoi Design Bureau 1,000+ February 22, 1975 July 19, 1981
Sukhoi Su-27 "Sofiyka" Flanker multirole fighter, air superiority fighter twinjet, single-seat Sukhoi Design Bureau 809 May 20, 1977 June 22, 1985
Mikoyan MiG-29 Fulcrum multirole fighter, air superiority fighter twinjet, single-seat Mikoyan 1,600+ October 6, 1977 July 1982
Tupolev Tu-160 "Beliy Lebed" Blackjack supersonic strategic bomber variable-sweep wing, four engines, turbofan Tupolev 27 serial and 8 prototypes December 19, 1981 December 30, 2005
Ilyushin Il-78 Midas inflight refuelling tanker four engines Ilyushin Aviation Complex 53 June 26, 1983 1984
Sukhoi Su-33 Flanker-D carrier-based multirole fighter, air superiority fighter twinjet, single-seat Sukhoi Design Bureau 35 August 17, 1987 August 31, 1998
Sukhoi Su-30 Flanker-C multirole fighter twinjet, twin-seat Sukhoi Design Bureau 540+ December 31, 1989 1996
Sukhoi Su-34 Fullback fighter-bomber, strike fighter twinjet, twin-seat Sukhoi Design Bureau 102 April 13, 1990 March 20, 2014
Yakovlev Yak-130 Mitten advanced trainer, light fighter twinjet, twin-seat Yakovlev Design Bureau 115+ April 25, 1996 February 19, 2010
Mikoyan MiG-35 Fulcrum-F multirole fighter twinjet, single-seat/twin-seat Mikoyan 3, 2 pre-series February 2007 Planned for 2018
Sukhoi Su-35S Flanker-E multirole fighter, air superiority fighter twinjet, single-seat Sukhoi Design Bureau 58 February 19, 2008 2014
Sukhoi Su-57 PAK FA - stealth aircraft, air superiority fighter twinjet, single-seat Sukhoi Design Bureau 9 flyable prototypes January 29, 2010 Planned for 2019
Yakovlev Yak-152 - trainer aircraft single-seat Yakovlev Design Bureau 1 prototype September 29, 2016 Planned for 2017
Tupolev PAK DA - strategic bomber under development Tupolev 0 Planned for 2021 Planned for 2023
Ilyushin PAK TA - supersonic military transport under development Ilyushin Aviation Complex 0 N/A Planned for 2030

Corporate governance[edit]

Board of Directors[71][edit]

  • Denis Manturov (Chairman since 2015)
  • Yury Slyusar (President since January 2015)
  • Boris Alyoshin (Advisor to the President of UAC on Science and Technology since May 2015)
  • Vladimir Potapov (Independent Director since June 2017)
  • Yury Borisov
  • Valery Okulov
  • Andrey Ivanov
  • Yelin Evgeniy
  • Serdyukov Anatoly
  • Ivan Kharchenko
  • Jurchenko Evgeny

Chairman[edit]

President[edit]

According to the UAC, the President is the sole executive body of PJSC UAC with functions of the Chairman of the Management Board. The President is empowered to decide all issues pertaining to the Corporation’s current activities, except for matters falling within the competence of the General Shareholders’ Meeting, the Board of Directors and the Management Board.[2]

  • Before January 2015: Alexei Fyodorov
  • January 2015 – present: Yuri Slyusar

Management Board[edit]

  • President: Yuri Slyusar
  • Member: Demchenko Oleg Fedorovich

Vice Presidents[73][edit]

  • First Vice President: Alexander Tulyakov
  • Vice President for State Defense Order and Service Support of State Aviation Aircraft: Alexander Bobryshev
  • Vice President for special-purpose aviation: Sergey Gerasimov
  • Vice President of Economics and Finance: Demidov Alexey
  • Vice President for Security: Koval Artur
  • Vice President of special purpose and strategic aviation: Konyukhov Alexander
  • Vice President for Innovations: Sergey Korotkov
  • Vice President of Civil Aviation: Vladislav Masalov
  • Vice President for Military Aviation: Igor Ozar
  • Vice President - Head of the Office: Skokov Alexander
  • Vice President for Production: Sergey Yurasov
  • Member: Rogozin Alexey

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Denis Manturov - UAC". United Aircraft Corporation. 
  2. ^ a b "Yury Slyusar - UAC". United Aircraft Corporation. 
  3. ^ "Consolidated Financial Statements for 2016" (pdf). United Aircraft Corporation. 
  4. ^ "Consolidated Financial Statements for 2016" (pdf). United Aircraft Corporation. 
  5. ^ "Consolidated Financial Statements for 2016" (pdf). United Aircraft Corporation. 
  6. ^ "Consolidated Financial Statements for 2016" (pdf). United Aircraft Corporation. 
  7. ^ "Consolidated Financial Statements for 2016" (pdf). United Aircraft Corporation. 
  8. ^ "Список аффилированных лиц". E-disclosure.ru. Retrieved 25 August 2017. 
  9. ^ "Коэффициент free-float (доля ценных бумаг в свободном обращении) по состоянию на 26.08.2017". Московская Биржа. Retrieved 26 August 2017. 
  10. ^ "Russia's United Aircraft reaches maturity". Flight International. 14 June 2010. Archived from the original on 15 August 2009. Retrieved 14 May 2011. 
  11. ^ "Contacts - UAC". United Aircraft Corporation. 
  12. ^ "History - UAC". United Aircraft Corporation. 
  13. ^ Rutland, Peter (2005). "Putin's Economic Record". In White; Gitelman; Sakwa. Developments in Russian Politics. 6. Duke University Press. ISBN 0-8223-3522-0. 
  14. ^ Kwiatkowski, Alex (2003-02-07). "BUSINESS. Aviation industry locked in a tailspin". The Russia Journal. 
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