Jewish Federations of North America

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Jewish Federations
of North America
The logo of Jewish Federations of North America
Abbreviation JFNA
Formation January 31, 1935; 81 years ago (1935-01-31)[1]
13-1624240[2]
Legal status 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization
Headquarters New York City
Region
North America
Gerrald Silverman[2]
Michael D. Siegal[2]
Subsidiaries United Israel Appeal Inc,[2]
JFBP LLC[2]
Revenue (2012)
$49,030,087[2]
Expenses (2012) $49,202,648[2]
Endowment $26,108,921 (2012)[2]
Employees (2012)
144[2]
Volunteers (2012)
185[2]
Mission To protect and enhance the well-being of Jews worldwide through the values of tikkun olam, tzedakah, and Torah. To lead a continental movement to mobilize financial and social resources through philanthropic endeavors, strategic initiatives, and international agencies that strengthen the Jewish people.[2]
Website jewishfederations.org
Formerly called
The United Jewish Appeal,[1]
United Jewish Communities[1]
Delegation of Jewish Federations of North America in Israel

The Jewish Federations of North America (JFNA), formerly the United Jewish Communities (UJC), is an American Jewish umbrella organization representing 152 Jewish Federations and 300 independent Jewish communities across North America. JFNA was formed from the merger of the United Jewish Appeal (UJA), Council of Jewish Federations, and the United Israel Appeal.[3]

JFNA provides fundraising, organization assistance, training, and overall leadership to the Jewish Federations and communities throughout the United States and Canada. The Federation movement protects and enhances the well-being of Jews worldwide through the values of tikkun olam, tzedakah and Torah. Four hundred smaller Jewish communities in North America are members of the Network of Independent Communities,[4] which are administered via the JFNA.

JFNA hosts a General Assembly for the Federations to meet annual and exchange information.[5]

History[edit]

Council of Jewish Federations[edit]

The original umbrella organization for the federations was the National Council of Jewish Federations and Welfare Funds formed in 1932.[5][6] "National" was dropped from the name in 1935 and "Welfare Funds" was removed in 1979.[5]

Jewish Federations of North America[edit]

In 1999, the CJF merged with the United Jewish Appeal to become the United Jewish Communities.[5] In October 2009, the UJC was renamed the Jewish Federations of North America.[7]

After the 2009 launch of the new logo for The Jewish Federations of North America, increasing numbers of local Federations are switching to some variant of that logo. An example is the Jewish Federation of Greater Washington.[8]

After a couple of years of lower staff layoffs in February 2010, new CEO Jerry Silverman laid off three senior vice presidents that made an estimated $750,000 to $1 million combined.[9] JNFA declined to run the decennial National Jewish Population Survey in 2010 due to re-prioritizing.[10]

National Jewish Population Survey[edit]

The National Jewish Population Survey (NJPS) was a decennial survey ran by JFNA as a census of the Jewish community in the United States. The NJPS has been controversial at times. The 1990 survey indicated that inter-faith marriage was occurring at a rate of 52 percent which was quickly denounced by demographers. With the NJPS 2000-01, a number of problems plagued the survey as it used a different method then the 1990 thus not comparable, cost $6 million and the data was lost. JFNA would not fund the 2010 survey due to re-prioritizing given decreased revenue given its limited direct benefits while some Jewish federations like the New York federation. JFNA was then open to partnering with other agencies on the national survey.[10]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "The Jewish Federations of North America, Inc." Division of Corporations, State Records, and UCC. State of New York. Accessed on December 31, 2015.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k "FOrm 990: Return of Organization Exempt from Income Tax". Jewish Federations of North America Inc. Guidestar. June 30, 2013.
  3. ^ "UJC To Get Name Change", Jewish Telegraphic Agency
  4. ^ "Network of Independent Communities". The Jewish Federations of North America. January 5, 2010. Retrieved January 5, 2010. 
  5. ^ a b c d Karesh, Sara E.; Hurvitz, Mitchell M. (2006). "United Jewish Communities". In Melton, J. Gordon. Encyclopedia of Judaism. Infobase Publishing. pp. 534–535. ISBN 978-0-8160-5457-2. Retrieved June 14, 2011. In 1932 the National Council of Jewish Federations and Welfare Funds (NCJFWF) united the Jewish federations across the country. In 1935 the organization changed its name to the Council of Jewish Federations and Welfare Funds (CJFWF), and in 1979 the name became the Council of Jewish Federations (CJF). [...] In 1999, the United Jewish Appeal and the Council of Jewish Federations merged to become the United Jewish Communities. 
  6. ^ Elazar, Daniel Judah (1995) [1976]. Community and polity:the organizational dynamics of American Jewry. Jewish Publication Society. p. 413. ISBN 978-0-8276-0565-7. Retrieved June 14, 2011. This new phenomenon was incorporated into campaign strategy, particularly through "Super Sunday," a day-long happening featuring marches on behalf of some special financial need and massive telephoning of potential donors in a more exciting carnival-like atmosphere. 
  7. ^ Elliott, Stuart (May 17, 2010). "You Don’t Have to Be Jewish to Love This Campaign". New York Times. Retrieved June 14, 2011. ...the Jewish Federations, which changed its name in October from the United Jewish Communities. 
  8. ^ "Jewish Federation of Greater Washington adaptation of JFNA logo". The Jewish Federations of North America. Retrieved January 5, 2010. 
  9. ^ Berkman, Jacob (February 23, 2010). "Inside the top-level layoffs at Jewish Federations of North America". Jewish Telegraphic Agency. Retrieved January 6, 2016. 
  10. ^ a b Heilman, Uriel (July 12, 2011). "Is the era of national surveys of American Jews at an end?". Jewish Telegraphic Agency. Retrieved January 6, 2016. 

External links[edit]