2017 United Kingdom general election in Northern Ireland

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United Kingdom general election, 2017 (Northern Ireland)
← 2015 8 June 2017 Next →

All 18 seats in Northern Ireland to the House of Commons
  First party Second party
  Arlene Foster Gerry Adams Pre Election Press Conference.jpg
Leader Arlene Foster Gerry Adams
Party DUP Sinn Féin
Leader since 17 December 2015 13 November 1983
Leader's seat Did not stand Did not stand
Last election 8 seats, 25.7% 4 seats, 24.5%
Seats won 10 7
Seat change Increase2 Increase3
Popular vote 292,316 238,915
Percentage 36.0% 29.4%
Swing Increase10.3% Increase4.9%

United Kingdom general election, 2017 (Northern Ireland).svg
Colours on map indicate winning party for each constituency

The 2017 United Kingdom general election in Northern Ireland was held on 8 June 2017. All 18 seats in Northern Ireland were contested. The DUP gained 2 seats for a total of 10, and Sinn Féin won 7, an improvement of 3. Independent unionist Sylvia Hermon was also re-elected in her constituency of North Down. Meanwhile, the SDLP lost 3 seats and the UUP lost 2 seats. Both lost all their representation in the House of Commons.

As Sinn Féin maintains a policy of abstentionism in regards to the British Parliament, the 2017 election marked the first parliament since 1964 without any Irish nationalist MPs who take their seats in the House of Commons in Westminster.

Nationally, the governing Conservative Party fell 8 seats short of a parliamentary majority after the election, reduced to 4 if the absence of Sinn Féin is taken into account. The DUP thus holds the balance of power, and announced on 10 June that it would support the Conservative government on a "confidence and supply" basis.[1] (See also Conservative–DUP agreement.)

Results[edit]

Five seats changed hands in Northern Ireland. The SDLP lost its seats in Foyle and South Down to Sinn Féin and the constituency of Belfast South to the DUP. Meanwhile, the UUP lost South Antrim to the DUP and Fermanagh and South Tyrone to Sinn Féin. The number of unionist and nationalist representatives (11 and 7, respectively) remained unchanged from the 2015 general election, although none of the nationalist members are participating in the current Parliament.

Party Votes % +/- MPs % +/-
DUP 292,316 36.0 +10.3 10 55.6 +2
Sinn Féin 238,915 29.4 +4.9 7 38.9 +3
SDLP 95,419 11.7 -2.2 0 -3
UUP 83,280 10.3 -5.8 0 -2
Alliance 64,553 7.9 -0.6 0 0
Independent 16,148 2.0 N/A 1 5.6 0
Green (NI) 7,452 0.9 -0.1 0 0
People Before Profit 5,509 0.7 N/A 0 0
NI Conservatives 3,895 0.5 N/A 0 0
TUV 3,282 0.4 -1.9 0 0

Vote summary[edit]

Popular vote
DUP
36.0%
Sinn Féin
29.4%
SDLP
11.7%
UUP
10.3%
Alliance
7.9%
Greens
0.9%
PBP
0.7%
NI Cons
0.5%
TUV
0.4%
Other
2.1%
Parliamentary seats
DUP
55.6%
Sinn Féin
38.9%
Independent
5.6%

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Who are the DUP and will they demand a soft Brexit to prop up the Tories?". The Daily Telegraph. Retrieved 9 June 2017.