United Nations Office on Sport for Development and Peace

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Office on Sport for Development and Peace
United Nations Office on Sport for Development and Peace
Logo of UNOSDP
Logo of UNOSDP
AbbreviationUNOSDP
Merged intoUnited Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs
FormationFebruary 28, 2001; 20 years ago (2001-02-28)
FounderKofi Annan
DissolvedApril 30, 2017; 4 years ago (2017-04-30)
Purposesport & peacekeeping
HeadquartersGeneve
Location
Coordinates46°13′42″N 6°06′35″E / 46.2283824°N 6.1097541°E / 46.2283824; 6.1097541Coordinates: 46°13′42″N 6°06′35″E / 46.2283824°N 6.1097541°E / 46.2283824; 6.1097541
UN Special Adviser on Sport for Development and Peace
Wilfried Lemke
Parent organization
United Nations
Websiteun.org/sport/

The United Nations Office on Sport for Development and Peace (UNOSDP) was introduced by Kofi Annan in 2001. Its mandate was to coordinate the efforts undertaken by the United Nations in promoting sport in a systematic and coherent way as a means to contribute to the achievement of development and peace.

The second UN Special Adviser on Sport for Development and Peace was Wilfried Lemke from Bremen, Germany. He succeeded Adolf Ogi in March 2008. UNOSDP was situated at the UN Office at Geneva. There was also a liaison office at UN Headquarters in New York.

The United Nations announced the closure of the Office on Sport for Development and Peace on the 4th of May 2017.[1]

The UN Special Adviser on Sport for Development and Peace[edit]

Wilfried Lemke from Germany has been the Special Adviser on Sport for Development and Peace since March 2008. He was named by UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon. Through this nomination, Lemke also holds the position of an Under-Secretary-General. He reports directly to the Secretary-General.

In his position as a Special Adviser, he replaced Adolf Ogi from Switzerland. Ogi, former President of the Swiss Confederation and politician, had served the UN as Special Adviser for close to seven years between 2001 and 2007.

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