United Nations Security Council Resolution 770

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UN Security Council
Resolution 770
Sarajevo.JPG
Sarajevo
Date 13 August 1992
Meeting no. 3,106
Code S/RES/770 (Document)
Subject Bosnia and Herzegovina
Voting summary
12 voted for
None voted against
3 abstained
Result Adopted
Security Council composition
Permanent members
Non-permanent members

United Nations Security Council resolution 770, adopted on 13 August 1992, after reaffirming previous resolutions on the topic, including Resolution 743 (1992), Resolution 749 (1992), Resolution 761 (1992) and Resolution 764 (1992), the Council recognised the humanitarian situation in Sarajevo and other areas in Bosnia and Herzegovina.

After determining the situation constituted a threat to international peace and security, the resolution was to be passed under Chapter VII of the United Nations Charter, the first resolution invoking Chapter VII on the case of the former Yugoslavia.[1][2] The Council demanded that all parties and others concerned in Bosnia and Herzegovina stop the fighting immediately, urging unimpeded and continuous access to all camps, prisons and detention centres for the International Committee of the Red Cross. It also called upon Member States, nationally or through international agencies, to facilitate the delivery of humanitarian aid to Sarajevo and others areas in Bosnia and Herzegovina, further requiring them to report to the Secretary-General Boutros Boutros-Ghali on the measures they have taken.

The resolution requested the Secretary-General to keep the situation under review to consider possible new measures to ensure the unimpeded delivery of humanitarian supplies, demanding all parties to guarantee the safety of United Nations and other humanitarian workers in the country.

Resolution 770 was adopted by twelve votes to none, with three abstentions from China, India and Zimbabwe.[3]

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References[edit]

  1. ^ Malanczuk, Peter; Akehurst, Michael Barton (1997). Akehurst's modern introduction to international law (7th ed.). Routledge. p. 411. ISBN 978-0-415-11120-1. 
  2. ^ Sarooshi, Danesh (2000). The United Nations and the development of collective security: the delegation by the UN Security Council of its chapter VII powers. Oxford University Press. pp. 217–218. ISBN 978-0-19-829934-9. 
  3. ^ Shrivastava, B. K.; Agarwal, Manmohan (2003). "Politics of intervention in the Bosnia-Herzegovina conflict". International Studies. Sage Publications. 40 (1): 69–84. doi:10.1177/002088170304000104. 

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