United Nations Security Council Resolution 780

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UN Security Council
Resolution 780
ICTY 2006-01-16.jpg
Date 6 October 1992
Meeting no. 3,119
Code S/RES/780 (Document)
Subject Former Yugoslavia
Voting summary
15 voted for
None voted against
None abstained
Result Adopted
Security Council composition
Permanent members
Non-permanent members

United Nations Security Council resolution 780, adopted unanimously on 6 October 1992, after reaffirming Resolution 713 (1991) and subsequent resolutions on the topic, the Council expressed its concern at the continued "widespread violations of international humanitarian law" in Bosnia and Herzegovina and authorised the Secretary-General Boutros Boutros-Ghali to establish a Commission of Experts to examine and analyse the information submitted pursuant to Resolution 771 (1992) on violations of the Geneva Conventions in the region.

The resolution urged Member States and international organisations to collect information relating to violations of international law in Bosnia and to make it available within 30 days of the adoption of the present resolution. Information collected would be analysed by the Commission of Experts. The Commission consisted of five members from Canada, Egypt, the Netherlands, Norway and Senegal, which submitted its first interim report in February 1993, concluding it would be for the Security Council or other component of the United Nations to create a tribunal relating to the events in Bosnia-Herzegovina, and the former Yugoslavia generally.[1] The then French Foreign Minister Roland Dumas congratulated the passage of the resolution, who said it was a "considerable step in the evolution of international law" and was unprecedented since the founding of the United Nations.[2]

The conclusions of the Commission of Experts were delivered to the President of the United Nations Security Council along with a letter from the Secretary-General on 24 May 1994.[3][4]

See also[edit]


  1. ^ Aksar, Yusuf (2004). Implementing international humanitarian law: from the ad hoc tribunals to a permanent International Criminal Court. Routledge. p. 17. ISBN 978-0-7146-8470-3. 
  2. ^ Schabas, William (2006). The UN international criminal tribunals: the former Yugoslavia, Rwanda and Sierra Leone. Cambridge University Press. p. 17. ISBN 978-0-521-84657-8. 
  3. ^ Letter from the Secretary-General to the President of the Security Council. 24 May 1994.
  4. ^ Commission of Experts report and conclusions on the evidence of grave breaches of the Geneva Conventions and other violations of international humanitarian law committed in the territory of the former Yugoslavia was concluded in April 1994.

External links[edit]