United Newfoundland Party

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The United Newfoundland Party was the name of two conservative parties in Newfoundland.

Pre-Confederation[edit]

The first UNP was a conservative party in the Dominion of Newfoundland led by Frederick C. Alderdice from 1928 to 1934. It was organized by Alderdice when disaffected Liberals joined his Liberal-Conservative Progressive Party sitting in Opposition and won the 1932 general election. His government was replaced by an appointed Commission of Government in 1934 (a change his party promised in its 1932 platform as a means of getting the Dominion our of fiscal trouble), resulting in the termination of responsible government in the Dominion. (see also Conservative parties in Newfoundland (pre-Confederation))

Post-Confederation[edit]

The second United Newfoundland Party was formed prior to the 1959 provincial election, made up of some Progressive Conservative Party of Newfoundland and Labrador caucus members and supporters. The party was formed immediately prior to the election when two Tory MHAs, led by James D. Higgins, supported Premier Joey Smallwood's stance in favour of Newfoundland receiving financial assistance from the federal government indefinitely. Provincial Conservative leader Malcolm Mercer Hollett supported the position of Conservative Prime Minister John Diefenbaker, who maintained that the funding agreement between the two orders of government had run its course. While two UNP MHAs were elected in 1959, Higgins was defeated.[1] Gus Duffy succeeded Higgins as UNP leader and sitting with fellow UNP MHA John R. O'Dea who stepped down after one term. In the 1962 provincial election, Duffy was defeated in his St. John's Centre riding.[2] The party became defunct soon after.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Smallwood and Government Returned in Newfoundland". The Montreal Gazette. August 21, 1959. Retrieved February 2, 2012. 
  2. ^ "Liberals Win Provincial Election in Newfoundland". Windsor Star. November 20, 1962. Retrieved February 2, 2012. 

See also[edit]