United States House of Representatives elections in Alabama, 2008

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The 2008 United States House of Representatives elections in Alabama were held on November 4, 2008 to determine who will represent the state of Alabama in the United States House of Representatives, coinciding with the presidential and senatorial elections. Representatives are elected for two-year terms; those elected will serve in the 111th Congress from January 4, 2009 until January 3, 2011.

Alabama has seven seats in the House, apportioned according to the 2000 United States Census. Its 2007-2008 congressional delegation consisted of five Republicans and two Democrats. It is now four Republicans and three Democrats. District 2 changed party (from open Republican to Democratic).

Overview[edit]

United States House of Representatives elections in Alabama, 2008[1][2]
Party Votes Percentage Seats +/–
Republican 1,120,903 60.42% 4 –1
Democratic 718,367 38.72% 3 +1
Independent 15,998 0.86% 0 0
Valid votes 1,855,268 88.11%
Invalid or blank votes 250,354 11.89%
Totals 2,105,622 100.00% 7
Voter turnout 74.11%

District 1[edit]

Alabama1st.JPG

The Democratic and Republican primaries were not contested. However, Democrat Thomas Fuller withdrew from the race on June 12, 2008, stating he was unable to wage a creditable campaign in the district.[3]

CQ Politics forecasted the race as 'Safe Republican'.[4]

Alabama's 1st congressional district election, 2008[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Jo Bonner (incumbent) 210,660 98.27%
Independent Write-in candidates 3,707 1.73%
Totals 214,367 100.00%
Republican hold

District 2[edit]

Alabama2nd.jpg

This district covers southeastern Alabama, including Dothan and Montgomery. CQ Politics forecasted the race as 'No Clear Favorite'. The Rothenberg Political Report rated it 'Pure Toss-Up'. The Cook Political Report ranked it 'Republican Toss Up'.

Republican Terry Everett, who had represented the district since 1993, decided to retire. Montgomery Mayor Bobby Bright won the Democratic primary. State Representative Jay Love won the Republican run-off election on July 15th against State Senator Harri Anne Smith (campaign website).[5] George W. Bush won 67% in 2004 here. Bright won 50% of the vote to Love's 49%.

Alabama's 2nd congressional district election, 2008[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Bobby Bright 144,368 50.23%
Republican Jay Love 142,578 49.61%
Independent Write-in candidates 448 0.16%
Totals 287,394 100.00%
Democratic gain from Republican

District 3[edit]

Alabama3rd.png

The Democratic and Republican primaries were not contested.

CQ Politics forecasted the race as 'Republican Favored'.[6]

Alabama's 3rd congressional district election, 2008[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Mike Rogers (incumbent) 142,708 54.03%
Democratic Joshua Segall 121,080 45.84%
Independent Write-in candidates 332 0.13%
Totals 264,120 100.00%
Republican hold

District 4[edit]

Alabama4th.png

The Republican primary was uncontested, and Nick Sparks won against Greg Warren in the Democratic primary.

CQ Politics forecasted the race as 'Safe Republican'.[7]

Alabama's 4th congressional district election, 2008[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Robert Aderholt (incumbent) 196,741 74.76%
Democratic Nick Sparks 66,077 25.11%
Independent Write-in candidates 349 0.13%
Totals 263,167 100.00%
Republican hold

District 5[edit]

Alabama5th.png

This district includes the counties of Colbert, Lauderdale, Lawrence, Limestone, Madison, Jackson, and parts of Morgan. Democratic incumbent Bud Cramer has represented the district since 1990. He did not seek reelection and endorsed State Senator Parker Griffith. CQ Politics forecasted the race as 'No Clear Favorite'. The Rothenberg Political Report rated it 'Pure Toss-Up'. The Cook Political Report ranked it 'Democrat Toss Up'.

In the June 3, 2008 primary election, there were eight candidates running for the seat. On the Democratic side, State Senator Dr. Parker Griffith defeated physicist David Maker (website), carrying 90% of the vote. Wayne Parker won the Republican runoff on July 15th against attorney Cheryl Baswell Guthrie (campaign website).[5] In the primary, Wayne Parker had failed to gain the necessary 51% of the vote to avoid the runoff. Guthrie had carried 18% of the vote. Wayne Parker is a son-in-law of former U.S. Representative Bill Archer of Texas, once chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee.

A year after his election, Griffith switched parties and ran for a second term in the 2010 Republican primary.


Alabama's 5th congressional district election, 2008[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Parker Griffith 158,324 51.52%
Republican Wayne Parker 147,314 47.94%
Independent Write-in candidates 1,644 0.54%
Totals 307,282 100.00%
Democratic hold

District 6[edit]

Alabama6th.PNG

The Democratic and Republican primaries were not contested.

CQ Politics forecasted the race as 'Safe Republican'.[8]

Alabama's 6th congressional district election, 2008[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Spencer Bachus (incumbent) 280,902 97.79%
Independent Write-in candidates 6,335 2.21%
Totals 287,237 100.00%
Republican hold

District 7[edit]

Alabama7th.PNG

The Democratic and Republican primaries were not contested.

CQ Politics forecasted the race as 'Safe Democrat'.[9]

Alabama's 6th congressional district election, 2008[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Artur Davis (incumbent) 228,518 98.63%
Independent Write-in candidates 3,183 1.37%
Totals 231,701 100.00%
Democratic hold

References[edit]

External links[edit]


Preceded by
2006 elections
United States House elections in Alabama
2008
Succeeded by
2010 elections