United States House of Representatives elections in Colorado, 2016

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United States House of Representatives elections in Colorado, 2016

← 2014 November 8, 2016 (2016-11-08) 2018 →

All seven Colorado seats to the United States House of Representatives

  Majority party Minority party Third party
 
Party Republican Democratic Libertarian
Last election 4 3 0
Seats won 4 3 0
Seat change Steady Steady Steady
Popular vote 1,288,618 1,263,791 143,338
Percentage 47.70% 46.78% 5.25%

United States House of Representatives Election 2016 - Colorado.svg
Popular vote by congressional district. As this is a first-past-the-post election, seat totals are not determined by total popular vote in the state, but instead by results in each congressional district.

The 2016 United States House of Representatives elections in Colorado were held on November 8, 2016, to elect the seven U.S. Representatives from the state of Colorado, one from each of the state's seven congressional districts. The elections coincided with the 2016 U.S. presidential election, as well as other elections to the House of Representatives, elections to the United States Senate and various state and local elections. The primaries were held on June 28.

District 1[edit]

The 1st district is located in Central Colorado and includes most of the city of Denver. The incumbent is Democrat Diana DeGette, who has represented the district since 1997. She was re-elected with 66% of the vote in 2014 and the district has a PVI of D+18.

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared

Results[edit]

Democratic primary results[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Diana DeGette 55,925 86.44
Democratic Charles H. "Chuck" Norris 8,770 13.56
Total votes 64,065 100

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared
  • Charles "Casper" Stockham

Results[edit]

Republican primary results[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Charles "Casper" Stockham 15,616 100

General election[edit]

Results[edit]

Colorado's 1st Congressional district election, 2016 [2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Diana DeGette (Incumbent) 257,254 67.87
Republican Charles "Casper" Stockham 105,030 27.71
Libertarian Darrell Dinges 16,752 4.42
Total votes 379,036 100
Democratic hold

District 2[edit]

The 2nd district is located in Northern Colorado and encompasses seven counties. The incumbent is Democrat Jared Polis, who has represented the district since 2009. He was re-elected with 56% of the vote in 2014 and isn't expected to have a primary challenger.

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared

Results[edit]

Democratic primary results[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Jared Polis 43,660 100

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared
  • Nicholas Morse, marketing executive

Results[edit]

Republican primary results[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Nicholas Morse 36,417 100

Libertarian primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

  • Richard Longstreth

General election[edit]

Results[edit]

Colorado's 2nd Congressional district election, 2016 [2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Jared Polis (Incumbent) 260,175 56.89
Republican Nicholas Morse 170,001 37.17
Libertarian Richard Longstreth 27,136 5.93
Total votes 457,312 100
Democratic hold

District 3[edit]

The 3rd district is located in Western and Southern Colorado and includes a large number of sparsely populated counties and the city of Grand Junction. The incumbent is Republican Scott Tipton, who has represented the district since 2011. He was re-elected with 58% of the vote in 2014 and the district has a PVI of R+5.

Tipton was mentioned as a potential candidate for the U.S. Senate, but announced that he will run for re-election instead.[3]

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared
  • Gail Schwartz

Results[edit]

Democratic primary results[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Gail Schwartz 35,823 100

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared

Results[edit]

Republican primary results[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Scott Tipton 43,992 78.86
Republican Alexander Beinstein 11,790 21.14
Total votes 55,782 100

General election[edit]

Results[edit]

Colorado's 3rd Congressional district election, 2016 [2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Scott Tipton (Incumbent) 204,220 54.60
Democratic Gail Schwartz 150,914 40.35
Libertarian Gaylon Kent 18,903 5.05
Total votes 374,037 100
Republican hold

District 4[edit]

The 4th district is located in Eastern Colorado and includes numerous sparsely populated counties. The incumbent is Republican Ken Buck, who has represented the district since 2015. He was elected with 65% of the vote in 2014 and the district has a PVI of R+11.

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared
  • Bob Seay

Results[edit]

Democratic primary results[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Bob Seay 22,520 100

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared

Results[edit]

Republican primary results[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Ken Buck 58,848 100

General election[edit]

Results[edit]

Colorado's 4th Congressional district election, 2016 [2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Ken Buck (Incumbent) 248,230 63.55
Democratic Bob Seay 123,642 31.65
Libertarian Bruce Griffith 18,761 4.80
Total votes 390,633 100
Republican hold

District 5[edit]

The 5th district is located in Central Colorado and includes Fremont, El Paso, Teller and Chaffee counties and the city of Colorado Springs. The incumbent is Republican Doug Lamborn, who has represented the district since 2007. He was re-elected with 60% of the vote in 2014 and the district has a PVI of R+13.

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared

Results[edit]

Democratic primary results[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Misty Plowright 13,419 58.15
Democratic Donald E. Martinez 9,658 41.85
Total votes 23,077 100

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared

Results[edit]

Republican primary results[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Doug Lamborn 51,018 68.04
Republican Calandra Vargas 23,968 31.96
Total votes 74,986 100

General election[edit]

Results[edit]

Colorado's 5th Congressional district election, 2016 [2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Doug Lamborn (Incumbent) 225,445 62.28
Democratic Misty Plowright 111,676 30.85
Libertarian Mike McRedmond 24,872 6.87
Total votes 361,993 100
Republican hold

District 6[edit]

The 6th district is located in Central Colorado and surrounds the city of Denver from the east, including the city of Aurora. The incumbent is Republican Mike Coffman, who has represented the district since 2009. He was re-elected with 52% of the vote in 2012 and the district has a PVI of D+1. The conservative political advocacy group Americans for Prosperity, which receives funding from the Koch brothers, launched a six-figure campaign effort supporting Coffman's candidacy.[5][6]

On July 5, 2015, Morgan Carroll, the former President of the Colorado Senate, announced she planned to challenge Coffman.[7] Andrew Romanoff, the former Speaker of the Colorado House of Representatives and the 2014 Democratic nominee, considered running again but ultimately decided against it.[8] Former State Representative Edward Casso established an exploratory committee in 2014 in preparation for a potential challenge,[9] but ultimately did not run.[1]

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared
Declined

Results[edit]

Democratic primary results[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Morgan Carroll 30,704 100
Total votes 30,704 100

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared

Results[edit]

Republican primary results[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Mike Coffman 41,288 100
Total votes 41,288 100

General election[edit]

Results[edit]

Colorado's 6th Congressional district election, 2016 [2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Mike Coffman (Incumbent) 191,626 50.91
Democratic Morgan Carroll 160,372 42.60
Libertarian Norm Olsen 18,778 4.99
Green Robert Lee Worthey 5,641 1.50
Total votes 376,417 100
Republican hold

District 7[edit]

The 7th district is located in Central Colorado, to the north and west of Denver and includes the cities of Thornton and Westminster and most of Lakewood. The incumbent is Democrat Ed Perlmutter, who has represented the district since 2007. He was re-elected with 55% of the vote in 2014 and the district has a PVI of D+5.

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared

Results[edit]

Democratic primary results[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Ed Perlmutter 35,196 100

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared
  • George Athanasopoulos

Results[edit]

Republican primary results[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican George Athanasopoulos 29,614 100

General election[edit]

Results[edit]

Colorado's 7th Congressional district election, 2016 [2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Ed Perlmutter (Incumbent) 199,758 55.18
Republican George Athanasopoulos 144,066 39.80
Libertarian Martin L. Buchanan 18,186 5.02
Total votes 362,010 100
Democratic hold

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o "June 28, 2016 Primary Election Official Results". Colorado Secretary of State. Retrieved 20 July 2016. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g "Official Results November 8, 2016 General Election". Colorado Secretary of State. Retrieved December 14, 2016. 
  3. ^ Pathé, Simone (December 11, 2015). "Scott Tipton Not Running for Colorado Senate Seat". Roll Call. Retrieved December 13, 2015. 
  4. ^ http://www.mistyforcongress.com/
  5. ^ Ho, Catherine (July 5, 2016). "Koch-backed group to wade into Colorado race amid worries GOP could lose the House". The Washington Post. Retrieved September 6, 2016. 
  6. ^ Matthews, Mark K. (July 5, 2016). "Koch brothers-backed political group AFP brings new firepower to Coffman-Carroll race". The Denver Post. Retrieved September 6, 2016. 
  7. ^ http://www.denverpost.com/2015/07/07/morgan-carroll-launches-campaign-to-unseat-mike-coffman/
  8. ^ a b "Democrats Eyeing 5 House Race Rematches in 2016". Roll Call. November 13, 2014. Retrieved November 19, 2014. 
  9. ^ a b c "Should Andrew Romanoff take break or run again? Also, former state rep mulls CD6". The Denver Post. November 13, 2014. Retrieved November 19, 2014. 
  10. ^ Sapin, Rachel (July 7, 2015). "State Sen. Morgan Carroll makes official her battle against Mike Coffman for Aurora's congressional seat". Aurora Sentinel. Retrieved July 7, 2015. 
  11. ^ Nir, David (April 17, 2015). "Daily Kos Elections Morning Digest: How is Russ Feingold like Han Solo? We're stoked to see him back". Daily Kos Elections. Retrieved May 4, 2015. 
  12. ^ a b Luning, Ernest (March 27, 2015). "Coffman turns 60, braces for new challenge ahead". The Colorado Statesman. Retrieved May 4, 2015. 
  13. ^ Levinson, Alexis (April 15, 2015). "Democratic Candidates Are Ready for Hillary Clinton". Roll Call. Retrieved May 4, 2015. 
  14. ^ a b Stokols, Eli (November 13, 2014). "Could Romanoff, after 9-point loss, challenge Coffman again in 2016?". KDVR. Retrieved May 4, 2015. 
  15. ^ Cahn, Emily (April 1, 2015). "The Year of the Rematch". Roll Call. Retrieved May 4, 2015. 

External links[edit]