2016 United States House of Representatives elections in North Carolina

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United States House of Representatives elections in North Carolina, 2016

← 2014 November 8, 2016 (2016-11-08) 2018 →

All 13 North Carolina seats to the United States House of Representatives
  Majority party Minority party
  Paul Ryan 113th Congress.jpg Nancy Pelosi 113th Congress 2013.jpg
Leader Paul Ryan Nancy Pelosi
Party Republican Democratic
Last election 10 3
Seats won 10 3
Seat change Steady Steady
Popular vote 2,447,326 2,142,661
Percentage 53.22% 46.60%
Swing Decrease 2.17% Increase 2.65%

NorthCarolina2016HouseofRepsElection.svg
District Results

The 2016 United States House of Representatives elections in North Carolina were held on November 8, 2016, to elect the 13 U.S. Representatives from the state of North Carolina, one from each of the state's 13 congressional districts. The elections coincided with the 2016 U.S. presidential election, as well as other elections to the House of Representatives, elections to the United States Senate and various state and local elections.

Primary elections were originally scheduled for March 15, but were moved to June 7, due to successful challenges to the 1st and 12th congressional districts in federal court and the drawing of new maps affecting almost all of the state's districts.[1]

Long before the court had ruled, candidates had filed for the March 15 party primaries for each district under the old maps in December 2015, per the North Carolina State Board of Elections.[2] After the court ruled and the North Carolina General Assembly passed new district maps, the State Board established a filing period for the new primary date for candidates of major parties, March 16–25. Candidates had to refile for the June 7 primary, if they still chose to run, in any district they chose. The results of the March 15 primary, which went ahead because ballots had already been printed and mailed to absentee voters by the time of the ruling, were not counted.[1]

Contents

2016 North Carolina redistricting[edit]

This image shows the 2016–2020 court-ordered NC Congressional districts.[3]

The North Carolina Legislature's 2012 redistricting was found unconstitutional by the United States District Court for the Middle District of North Carolina and replaced on February 19, 2016.[4]

District 1[edit]

The 1st district is located in Northeastern North Carolina. The new map made the 1st district somewhat more compact.[5] The incumbent is Democrat G. K. Butterfield, who has represented the district since 2004. He was re-elected with 73% of the vote in 2014.

Democratic primary[edit]

G.K. Butterfield is running for re-election and is unopposed for the Democratic nomination.[6]

Republican primary[edit]

No candidates filed for the Republican primary for this seat under the old map, but H. Powell Dew Jr., filed under the new map and is unopposed for his party's nomination.[7]

Libertarian primary[edit]

C. L. Cooke was running unopposed for the Libertarian nomination under the old map. J. J. Summerell was the only Libertarian candidate to file under the new map.[7]

General election[edit]

Results[edit]

North Carolina's 1st congressional district, 2016 [8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic G. K. Butterfield (incumbent) 240,661 68.62
Republican H. Powell Dew Jr. 101,567 28.96
Libertarian J. J. Summerell 8,471 2.42
Total votes 350,699 100
Democratic hold

District 2[edit]

The 2nd district is located in central North Carolina. The new map moved the 2nd district to the east and the north.[5] The incumbent is Republican Renee Ellmers, who has represented the district since 2011. She was re-elected with 59% of the vote in 2014.

Republican primary[edit]

Renee Ellmers ran for re-election to a fourth term.[9]

Ellmers faced a primary challenge from radio host Frank Roche in 2014. Despite Roche's weak fundraising, she won the primary by only 59% to 41%. Her role in a 20-week abortion ban bill being pulled intensified calls from the conservative wing to challenge her in 2016.[10]

Jim Duncan,[11] the former chairman of the Chatham County Republican Party and co-founder of the grassroots organization The Coalition for American Principles, challenged Ellmers for the Republican nomination at first but dropped out after the district lines changed.[12] 2014 candidate Frank Roche also ran again at first but likewise did not file in the new 2nd district.[13] Businessman Tim D'Annunzio and former North Carolina Republican Party communications director Kay Daly also ran before the district map changed and then switched to other districts.[14][15]

The new district incorporated much of what had been the 13th district, leading that district's representative, George Holding, to file as a candidate in the 2nd, although his home was now in the 4th district.[16] Meanwhile, Greg Brannon entered the 2nd district GOP primary as well, after losing the primary for U.S. Senate to incumbent Richard Burr.[17]

Ellmers was subject to a high level of campaign spending by outside groups aligning themselves with the Tea Party movement, including Americans for Prosperity, which spent in the "low six figures" to defeat her.[18] They opposed Ellmers for her votes on a bill related to abortion[10][18] as well as votes on spending and budget bills, and to support the continuation of the Export-Import Bank.[18]

Candidates[edit]

  • Greg Brannon
  • Renee Ellmers
  • George Holding
Withdrawn[edit]
  • Tim D'Annunzio (running in the 8th district)
  • Kay Daly (running in the 13th district)
  • Jim Duncan[19]
  • Frank Roche[20]

Results[edit]

Republican primary results[21]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican George Holding 17,084 53.40
Republican Renee Ellmers (inc.) 7,552 23.60
Republican Greg Brannon 7,359 23.00
Total votes 31,995 100

Democratic primary[edit]

Adam Coker was running unopposed for the Democratic nomination under the previous district map. After the new map was adopted, two candidates who had previously filed to run in the 13th district, like Holding, filed in the 2nd: John McNeil and Ron Sanyal.[22] They were joined by three other candidates who had previously not filed for any seat.

Candidates[edit]

  • Elton R. Brewington
  • Steven E. Hight
  • John P. McNeil
  • Ron Sanyal
  • Jane Watson
Withdrawn[edit]
  • Adam Coker (running in 13th district)

Results[edit]

Democratic primary results[21]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic John P. McNeil 7,613 46.12
Democratic Jane Watson 3,875 23.48
Democratic Steven E. Hight 1,870 11.33
Democratic Ron Sanyal 1,761 10.67
Democratic Elton R. Brewington 1,387 8.40
Total votes 16,506 100

General election[edit]

Results[edit]

North Carolina's 2nd congressional district, 2016 [8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican George Holding 221,485 56.71
Democratic John P. McNeil 169,082 43.29
Total votes 390,567 100
Republican hold

District 3[edit]

The 3rd district is located on the Atlantic coast of North Carolina. It covers the Outer Banks and the counties adjacent to the Pamlico Sound. The new map made the district somewhat more compact, removing some of its more southern and western areas.[5]

The incumbent is Republican Walter B. Jones Jr., who has represented the district since 1995.[23] He was re-elected with 68% of the vote in 2014.

Republican primary[edit]

Jones, who has a reputation as a maverick, is running for re-election, saying "I like to be a thorn in people's ass". Taylor Griffin, a one-time aide to United States Senator Jesse Helms and to President George W. Bush, ran against Jones in the Republican primary again in 2016, just as he had done in 2014.[24] Phil Law, a Hewlett-Packard site supervisor and Marine veteran, also ran as a Republican.[25]

Candidates[edit]

  • Taylor Griffin
  • Walter Jones
  • Phil Law

Results[edit]

Republican primary results[21]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Walter B. Jones Jr. 15,799 64.87
Republican Phil Law 4,946 20.31
Republican Taylor Griffin 3,610 14.82
Total votes 24,355 100

Democratic primary[edit]

David Allan Hurst was running unopposed for the Democratic nomination under the old map.[26] After the new district map was adopted, he was joined by U.S. Army veteran Ernest T. Reeves, who had just lost the Democratic primary for U.S. Senate to Deborah Ross.

Candidates[edit]

  • David Allan Hurst
  • Ernest T. Reeves

Results[edit]

Democratic primary results[21]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Ernest T. Reeves 6,456 54.68
Democratic David Allan Hurst 5,351 45.32
Total votes 11,807 100

General election[edit]

Results[edit]

North Carolina's 3rd congressional district, 2016 [8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Walter B. Jones (incumbent) 217,531 67.20
Democratic Ernest T. Reeves 106,170 32.80
Total votes 323,701 100
Republican hold

District 4[edit]

The 4th district is located in the Research Triangle area. The new map made the 4th district more compact, removing its southern portions.[5] The incumbent is Democrat David Price, who has represented the district since 1997, and previously represented it from 1987 to 1995. He was re-elected with 75% of the vote in 2014.

Democratic primary[edit]

David Price is running for re-election, and was unopposed for the Democratic nomination.[27]

Republican primary[edit]

Sue Googe, a first generation, Chinese immigrant, filed to challenge Price.[28]

Candidates[edit]

  • Sue Googe
  • Teiji Kimball

Results[edit]

Republican primary results[21]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Sue Googe 10,947 71.33
Republican Teiji Kimball 4,399 28.67
Total votes 15,346 100

General election[edit]

Results[edit]

North Carolina's 4th congressional district, 2016 [8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic David Price (incumbent) 279,380 68.22
Republican Sue Googe 130,161 31.78
Total votes 409,541 100
Democratic hold

District 5[edit]

The 5th district is located in northwestern North Carolina, from the Appalachian Mountains to the Piedmont Triad area. The new map shifted the district slightly to the north and put the entirety of Forsyth County in the district.[5] The incumbent is Republican Virginia Foxx, who has represented the district since 2005. She was re-elected with 61% of the vote in 2014.

Republican primary[edit]

Virginia Foxx is running for re-election.[29] Tea party activist Pattie Curran challenged Foxx for the Republican nomination.[30]

Candidates[edit]

  • Pattie Curran
  • Virginia Foxx

Results[edit]

Republican primary results[21]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Virginia Foxx 17,162 67.94
Republican Pattie Curran 8,098 32.06
Total votes 25,260 100

Democratic primary[edit]

Josh Brannon, the 2014 nominee for this seat, was running unopposed for the Democratic nomination under the previous district map. After the new district map was adopted, he was joined by two other challengers, including Jim Roberts, who had previously been running in the 6th district.

Candidates[edit]

  • Josh Brannon
  • Jim Roberts
  • Charlie Wallin

Results[edit]

Democratic primary results[21]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Josh Brannon 7,430 47.71
Democratic Charlie Wallin 4,184 26.87
Democratic Jim Roberts 3,959 25.42
Total votes 15,573 100

General election[edit]

Results[edit]

North Carolina's 5th congressional district, 2016 [8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Virginia Foxx (incumbent) 207,625 58.40
Democratic Josh Brannon 147,887 41.60
Total votes 355,512 100
Republican hold

District 6[edit]

The 6th district is located in northern-central North Carolina. The new map made the district more compact, removing some western, eastern and southern portions.[5] The incumbent is Republican Mark Walker, who has represented the district since 2015. He was elected with 59% of the vote in 2014, succeeding retiring Republican incumbent Howard Coble.

Republican primary[edit]

Walker is running for re-election to a second term.[31] Chris Hardin, a pharmaceutical representative, challenged Walker for the Republican nomination.[32] Kenn Kopf, an attorney who ran in the 2014 Republican primary, announced he would run again.[33] On December 21, 2015, Kopf announced he was suspending his campaign and would not file to run.[34]

Candidates[edit]

  • Chris Hardin
  • Mark Walker

Results[edit]

Republican primary results[21]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Mark Walker 16,859 77.92
Republican Chris Hardin 4,777 22.08
Total votes 21,636 100

Democratic primary[edit]

Former Guilford County Commissioner Bruce Davis, former Alamance County Democratic Party Chairman Pete Glidewell and Jim Roberts were seeking the Democratic nomination to challenge Walker under the old map.[35][36][37] After the new map was adopted, Davis and Roberts filed to run in different districts, leaving Glidewell unopposed for the nomination.

Candidates[edit]

  • Pete Glidewell
Withdrawn[edit]
  • Bruce Davis (running in the 13th district)
  • Jim Roberts (running in the 5th district)

General election[edit]

Results[edit]

North Carolina's 6th congressional district, 2016 [8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Mark Walker (incumbent) 207,983 59.23
Democratic Pete Glidewell 143,167 40.77
Total votes 351,150 100
Republican hold

District 7[edit]

The 7th district is located in southeastern North Carolina. The new map shifted the district slightly to the east, but much of it remained the same.[5] The incumbent is Republican David Rouzer, who has represented the district since 2015. He was elected with 59% of the vote in 2014, succeeding retiring Democratic incumbent Mike McIntyre.

Republican primary[edit]

Rouzer is running for re-election to a second term. Former North Carolina Republican Party second congressional district Chairman Mark Otto was challenging Rouzer for the Republican nomination under the old map,[38] but did not file his candidacy under the new map. New Hanover County Commissioner Woody White, who ran in 2014, was speculated to be considering a rematch, but decided not to run.[39][40]

Candidates[edit]

  • David Rouzer
Withdrawn[edit]
  • Mark Otto

Democratic primary[edit]

J. Wesley Casteen, an attorney and CPA who was the Libertarian nominee for this seat in 2014, was unopposed for the Democratic nomination.[38]

General election[edit]

Results[edit]

North Carolina's 7th congressional district, 2016 [8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican David Rouzer (incumbent) 211,801 60.91
Democratic J. Wesley Casteen 135,905 39.09
Total votes 347,706 100
Republican hold

District 8[edit]

The 8th district is located in southern-central North Carolina. The new map shifted the district slightly to the north and to the east.[5] The incumbent is Republican Richard Hudson, who has represented the district since 2013. He was re-elected with 65% of the vote in 2014.

Republican primary[edit]

Richard Hudson is running for re-election to a third term, and was unopposed for the Republican nomination under the old map.[41] Wes Rhinier, a Rowan County Republican Party Executive Committee member, had expressed interest in a primary challenge of Hudson, but did not end up running.[42] After the new district map was adopted, Tim D'Annunzio, who had been running in the 2nd district, filed instead to run in the 8th.

Candidates[edit]

  • Tim D'Annunzio
  • Richard Hudson

Results[edit]

Republican primary results[21]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Richard Hudson 16,375 64.58
Republican Tim D'Annunzio 8,943 35.42
Total votes 25,248 100

Democratic primary[edit]

Thomas Mills was unopposed for the Democratic nomination. Local Democrats had attempted to recruit former State Senator Cal Cunningham to challenge Hudson, but Cunningham announced he was not running for office in 2016.[43]

General election[edit]

Results[edit]

North Carolina's 8th congressional district, 2016 [8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Richard Hudson (incumbent) 189,863 58.77
Democratic Thomas Mills 133,182 41.23
Total votes 323,045 100
Republican hold

District 9[edit]

The 9th district is located in south-central North Carolina. The new map moved the 9th district to the east and to the south.[5] The incumbent is Republican Robert Pittenger, who has represented the district since 2013. He was re-elected with 94% of the vote in 2014.

Republican primary[edit]

George Rouco, an attorney and former CIA officer, was challenging Pittenger for the Republican nomination under the old map.[44] After the new map was adopted, Rouco filed to run in the 13th district instead. Meanwhile, two other Republicans filed to challenge Pittenger, including the Rev. Mark Harris, who ran in 2014 for the U.S. Senate, and former Union County Commissioner Todd Johnson.[45]

Candidates[edit]

Results[edit]

Republican primary results[21]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Robert Pittenger 9,299 34.95
Republican Mark Harris 9,165 34.45
Republican Todd Johnson 8,142 30.60
Total votes 26,606 100

Harris called for a recount, as allowed under state law because Pittenger's margin of victory was so small.[46]

Withdrawn[edit]
  • George Rouco (running in the 13th district)

Democratic primary[edit]

Christian Cano was unopposed for the Democratic nomination.

General election[edit]

Results[edit]

North Carolina's 9th congressional district, 2016 [8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Robert Pittenger (incumbent) 193,452 58.18
Democratic Christian Cano 139,041 41.82
Total votes 332,493 100
Republican hold

District 10[edit]

The 10th district is located in central and western North Carolina. The new map made only minor changes to the district.[5] The incumbent is Republican Patrick McHenry, who has represented the district since 2005. He was re-elected with 61% of the vote in 2014.

Republican primary[edit]

Patrick McHenry is running for re-election.[47] He was being opposed by one candidate, Albert Wiley, in the Republican primary under the old map. After the new map was adopted, two more Republican challengers filed.

Candidates[edit]

  • Jeffrey Baker
  • Jeff Gregory
  • Patrick McHenry
  • Albert Wiley

Results[edit]

Republican primary results[21]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Patrick McHenry 14,817 78.42
Republican Jeff Gregory 2,277 12.05
Republican Jeffrey Baker 905 4.79
Republican Albert Lee Wiley Jr. 896 4.74
Total votes 18,895 100

Democratic primary[edit]

Financial planner Andy Millard was unopposed for the Democratic nomination.[48]

General election[edit]

Results[edit]

North Carolina's 10th congressional district, 2016 [8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Patrick McHenry (incumbent) 220,825 63.14
Democratic Andy Millard 128,919 36.86
Total votes 349,744 100
Republican hold

District 11[edit]

The 11th district is located in western North Carolina. The new map made only minor changes to the district.[5]

The incumbent is Republican Mark Meadows, who has represented the district since 2013. He was re-elected with 63% of the vote in 2014.

Republican primary[edit]

Mark Meadows is running for re-election to a third term, and was unopposed for the Republican nomination.[49]

Democratic primary[edit]

Bryson City Alderman Rick Bryson and 2014 nominee Tom Hill ran for the Democratic nomination.[50][51]

Candidates[edit]

  • Rick Bryson
  • Tom Hill

Results[edit]

Democratic primary results[21]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Rick Bryson 9,695 50.67
Democratic Tom Hill 9,440 49.33
Total votes 19,099 100

General election[edit]

Results[edit]

North Carolina's 11th congressional district, 2016 [8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Mark Meadows (incumbent) 230,405 64.09
Democratic Rick Bryson 129,103 35.91
Total votes 359,508 100
Republican hold

District 12[edit]

The 12th district includes nearly all of Charlotte and surrounding Mecklenburg County. The new 2016 map made major changes to the 12th district, which had previously been a narrow district that included parts of Winston-Salem, Greensboro, Lexington, Salisbury, Concord, and High Point, as well as parts of Charlotte.[5] The incumbent is Democrat Alma Adams, who has represented the district since 2014. She was elected with 75% of the vote in 2014.

Democratic primary[edit]

Alma Adams is running for re-election to a second term.[52] Adams' home in Greensboro was removed from the 12th district, but she announced she would move to Charlotte.[53] Gardenia Henley, a retired U.S. diplomat, Inspector General Auditor and frequent candidate who ran in 2014 for the 5th district, was challenging Adams for the Democratic nomination under the previous map, and continued to run after the map changed.[54]

Former State Senator Malcolm Graham of Mecklenburg County, who lost the 2014 primary to Adams (44%-24%), was rumored as a potential primary challenger.[55] Subsequently, Graham did not run under the map in place at the time.[56] Later, however, after the new district map was adopted, Graham filed to run. Three members of the North Carolina House of Representatives who represent parts of Mecklenburg County also ran: Tricia Cotham, Carla Cunningham and Rodney W. Moore.[57] Moore later suspended his campaign, but his name remained on the ballot.[58]

Candidates[edit]

  • Alma Adams
  • Tricia Cotham
  • Carla D. Cunningham
  • Gardenia Henley
  • Malcolm Graham
  • Rick Miller
  • Rodney W. Moore
Withdrawn[edit]
  • Juan Antonio Marin Jr.

Results[edit]

Democratic primary results[21]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Alma Adams 12,400 42.51
Democratic Malcolm Graham 8,428 28.89
Democratic Tricia Cotham 6,165 21.13
Democratic Carla D. Cunningham 1,255 4.30
Democratic Gardenia Henley 444 1.52
Democratic Rodney W. Moore 245 0.84
Democratic Rick Miller 235 0.81
Total votes 29,172 100

Republican primary[edit]

Three candidates filed as Republicans: Ryan Duffie, a securities trader;[59] Leon Threatt, a pastor and former police officer;[60] and Paul Wright, a retired judge who ran for U.S. Senate in 2016, in the 4th congressional district in 2014, and for Governor in 2012.[61]

Candidates[edit]

  • Ryan Duffie
  • Leon Threatt
  • Paul Wright

Results[edit]

Republican primary results[21]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Leon Threatt 3,495 41.80
Republican Paul Wright 2,894 34.61
Republican Ryan Duffie 1,973 23.59
Total votes 8,362 100

General election[edit]

Results[edit]

North Carolina's 12th congressional district, 2016 [8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Alma Adams (incumbent) 234,115 67.02
Republican Leon Threatt 115,185 32.98
Total votes 349,300 100
Democratic hold

District 13[edit]

The 13th district is located primarily in the Piedmont Triad area. The new map completely moved the 13th district, which had previously consisted of parts of Wake County and eastern North Carolina.[5] The incumbent is Republican George Holding, who has represented the district since 2013. He was re-elected with 57% of the vote in 2014.

Republican primary[edit]

George Holding had been running for re-election to a third term, and was unopposed for the Republican nomination, under the old map. After the new map was adopted, he filed to run in the 2nd district. The new district attracted a large field of Republican candidates, including state Representatives John Blust, Julia Howard, Harry J. Warren and state Senator Andrew Brock, as well as perennial candidates James Snyder Jr. and Vernon Robinson, and Dan Barrett, a county commissioner who ran for Governor in 2004.

Ted Budd, a gun shop owner who had never before run for public office, won the Republican nomination.[62]

Candidates[edit]

  • Dan Barrett
  • John Blust
  • Andrew C. Brock
  • Ted Budd
  • Kay Daly
  • Kathy Feather
  • Chad A. Gant
  • Hank Henning
  • Julia Craven Howard
  • Matthew J. McCall
  • Vernon Robinson
  • George Rouco
  • Farren K. Shoaf
  • Jim Snyder
  • David W. Thompson
  • Jason A. Walser
  • Harry Warren
Withdrawn[edit]
  • George Holding (running in the 2nd district)

Results[edit]

Republican primary results[21]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Ted Budd 6,340 20.00
Republican John Blust 3,308 10.43
Republican Hank Henning 3,289 10.37
Republican Julia Craven Howard 3,254 10.26
Republican Matthew J. McCall 2,872 9.06
Republican Andrew C. Brock 2,803 8.84
Republican Jason A. Walser 2,319 7.31
Republican Dan Barrett 2,296 7.24
Republican Harry Warren 1,266 3.99
Republican Vernon Robinson 970 3.06
Republican Kay Daly 889 2.80
Republican George Rouco 773 2.44
Republican Jim Snyder 436 1.38
Republican Farren K. Shoaf 404 1.27
Republican Chad A. Gant 198 0.62
Republican David W. Thompson 147 0.46
Republican Kathy Feather 142 0.45
Total votes 31,706 100

Democratic primary[edit]

Ron Sanyal, who ran for this seat in 2014,[63] and John P. McNeil, an attorney and U.S. Marine Corps veteran, were running for the seat under the old map.[64] After the new map was adopted, they filed to run in the 2nd district instead. New candidates in the 13th included businessman Kevin Griffin, who had just lost the Democratic primary for U.S. Senate to Deborah Ross.

Bruce Davis, a veteran, small business owner, and former Guilford County Commissioner, won the Democratic nomination.[65] Bob Isner, father of tennis star John Isner, came in a close second.[66]

Candidates[edit]

  • Adam Coker
  • Bruce Davis
  • Mazie Ferguson
  • Kevin D. Griffin
  • Bob Isner
Withdrawn[edit]
  • John McNeil (running in the 2nd district)
  • Ron Sanyal (running in the 2nd district)

Results[edit]

Democratic primary results[21]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Bruce Davis 4,709 25.68
Democratic Bob Isner 4,597 25.07
Democratic Adam Coker 4,125 22.49
Democratic Mazie Ferguson 2,963 16.16
Democratic Kevin D. Griffin 1,946 10.61
Total votes 18,340 100

General election[edit]

Results[edit]

North Carolina's 13th congressional district, 2016 [8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Ted Budd 199,443 56.10
Democratic Bruce Davis 156,049 43.90
Total votes 355,492 100
Republican hold

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "NC House sets congressional primary on June 7; Senate OKs new map". newsobserver. Retrieved 2016-03-05.
  2. ^ "Candidate Listing" (PDF). North Carolina State Board of Elections. Retrieved December 21, 2015.
  3. ^ http://www.ncleg.net/representation/Content/Plans/PlanPage_DB_2016.asp?Plan=2016_Contingent_Congressional_Plan_-_Corrected&Body=Congress
  4. ^ http://www.charlotteobserver.com/news/politics-government/article58760423.html
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m The previous (2011) map is located at http://www.ncleg.net/GIS/Download/District_Plans/DB_2011/Congress/Rucho-Lewis_Congress_3/Maps/mapSimple.pdf and the current (2016) map is located at http://www.ncleg.net/GIS/Download/District_Plans/DB_2016/Congress/CCP16_Corrected/CCP16_Corrected_11x17.pdf
  6. ^ Wolfe, Wes (December 9, 2015). "Primary, November ballots continue to fill". Kinston Free Press. Retrieved December 16, 2015.
  7. ^ a b Candidate filings from NC State Board of Elections
  8. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m "North Carolina Official General Election Results". North Carolina State Board of Elections. November 8, 2016. Retrieved January 3, 2017.
  9. ^ Leslie, Laura (December 18, 2015). "Eyeing growing primary field, Ellmers burnishes credentials". WRAL. Retrieved December 21, 2015.
  10. ^ a b Emily Cahn (January 23, 2015). "Renee Ellmers May Face Primary Challenge". Roll Call. Retrieved January 26, 2015.
  11. ^ "Jim Duncan for NC". Jim Duncan for NC. Jim for NC Committee.
  12. ^ Jarvis, Craig (April 6, 2015). "Ellmers gets GOP challenger". The News & Observer. Retrieved April 6, 2015.
  13. ^ Jarvis, Craig (April 17, 2015). "Roche running against Ellmers again". The News & Observer. Retrieved April 22, 2015.
  14. ^ Barksdale, Andrew (December 15, 2015). "Spring Lake Mayor Chris Rey files for U.S. Senate". The Fayetteville Observer. Retrieved December 17, 2015.
  15. ^ Wing, Nick (September 25, 2015). "Holy Smokes, This Is A Real Campaign Ad!". The Huffington Post. Retrieved October 6, 2015.
  16. ^ News & Observer: U.S. Rep. George Holding plans to challenge Rep. Renee Ellmers under new map
  17. ^ News & Observer: Greg Brannon to enter 2nd District primary against Renee Ellmers, George Holding
  18. ^ a b c Taylor, Jessica (6 June 2016). "How A Tea Partier Became Its Villain — And Why She Could Lose Tuesday". NPR. Retrieved 5 September 2017.
  19. ^ News & Observer: Jim Duncan ends congressional campaign
  20. ^ News & Observer: Frank Roche won't run
  21. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p NC State Board of Elections website: June 7 federal primary election results
  22. ^ News & Observer: Holding's Democratic challengers plan to follow him to new 2nd district
  23. ^ Frank, John (October 31, 2013). "GOP 'extremist movement' prompts NC Candidate to Switch to Democrat". News & Observer.
  24. ^ Emily Cahn (February 19, 2015). "Undeterred by Primary Threats, Walter Jones to Seek 12th Term". Roll Call. Retrieved March 22, 2015.
  25. ^ Wolfe, Wes (March 19, 2015). "Challenger announces for Jones' House seat". Kinston Free Press. Retrieved March 20, 2015.
  26. ^ "David Allan Hurst".
  27. ^ "Walker, Price file for re-election to U.S. House". The Times-News. December 4, 2015. Retrieved December 16, 2015.
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External links[edit]