United States Marine Corps Physical Fitness Test

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100 crunches are required for a perfect score of 100 points for this event.

The United States Marine Corps requires that all Marines perform a Physical Fitness Test (PFT) and a Combat Fitness Test (CFT) once per calendar year. Each test must have an interval of 6 months (same standards apply for reservists). The PFT ensures that Marines are keeping physically fit and in a state of physical readiness. It consists of pull-ups, crunches and a 3-mile run for males. For females it consists of flexed arm hang, crunches and a 3-mile run.

On 1 October 2008 the Marine Corps introduced the additional pass/fail Combat Fitness Test (CFT) to the fitness requirements. The CFT is designed to measure abilities demanded of Marines in a war zone.[1]

Tests[edit]

Pull-up or Flexed arm hang[edit]

A maximum score is achieved with 20 pull-ups

The pull-up may be done with either an overhand (pronated) grip or an underhand (supinated) "chin-up" grip. Changes in grip are allowed as long as the feet don't touch the ground and only the hands come in contact with the pull-up bar. The pull-up begins at the "dead-hang" with arms extended and the body hanging motionless. A successful pull-up is performed without excess motion, the body rising until the chin is above the bar, and body lowered back to the "dead-hang" position. There is no time limit.[2][not in citation given]

Female Marines perform the flexed hang instead of the pull-up. The flexed hang is started with the chin above the pull-up bar. The timer is started and does not stop until the arms become fully extended. The feet may not touch the ground or any part of the pull-up bar at any time.

The Marine Corps had originally indicated that, as of January 1, 2014, female Marines would be required to perform a minimum of three pull-ups in order to pass the PFT.[3] However, when more than half of female recruits were unable to meet this standard,[4][5] the change was delayed. As of 2016, the Corps was "continuing to assess" the intended changes,[6] and was considering a hybrid approach where women could choose to do either exercise, with pull-ups scoring higher than the flexed-arm hang.[4]

Crunches[edit]

Crunches are executed while lying on the back with the feet flat on the ground together or 12 inches apart (whichever is more comfortable), knees bent at a 90 degree angle, and arms on the ribcage or chest. One crunch is completed when the upper body is lifted until both arms touch the thighs and then lowered until the shoulder blades touch the ground. The arms must be in constant contact with the chest or rib cage; the buttocks must be in constant contact with the ground. The exercise is performed with the heels of the feet kept in constant contact with the ground. The Marine is given two minutes to complete as many crunches as possible.

Run[edit]

A perfect score is achieved by completing the three mile run in less than 18 minutes

The Marine runs three miles on reasonably flat ground. (Actual distance may vary slightly.) The 3 miles is approximately 5 kilometers.

Scoring[edit]

Marine Corps PFTs are scored the following way for males:

  • Pull-ups: Each complete pull-up is worth 5 points up to a maximum of 100 points (20 pull-ups). Additional pull-ups beyond 20 are not counted and do not add to the score.
  • Crunches: Each completed crunch is worth 1 point up to a maximum of 100 points. Any crunches completed after the two-minute time limit are not counted and do not add to the score.
  • Three mile run: A perfect score of 100 points is achieved by completing the run in less than 18 minutes. One point is deducted from the score for each additional ten seconds that it takes to complete the run. Completing the run in less than 18 minutes does not add to the score.

Marine Corps PFTs are scored the following way for females:

  • Flex-arm hang: The maximum score of 100 points is achieved when the recruit maintains the flex-arm hang for 70 seconds. The clock is stopped when the recruit drops off the bar or the arms become fully extended. The chin at no time is allowed to touch the bar. The score is calculated by subtracting the actual hang time in seconds from the maximum hang time (70 seconds) and deducting two points for each second of difference.
  • Crunches: Each completed crunch is worth 1 point up to a maximum of 100 points. Any crunches completed after the two-minute time limit are not counted and do not add to the score. (Note: This is the only event that is scored identically to the male event.)
  • Three mile run: A perfect score of 100 points is achieved by completing the run in less than 21 minutes. One point is deducted from the score for each additional ten seconds that it takes to complete the run. Completing the run in less than 21 minutes does not add to the score.

Maximums and minimums[edit]

Marine Corps PFT Classification Scores – Male and Female
Class Age
17–26 27–39 40–45 46+
1st 225 200 175 150
2nd 175 150 125 100
3rd 135 110 88 65

To earn a perfect PFT score of 300 points, a male must do 20 pull-ups, 100 crunches in less than two minutes, and complete the three mile run in 18 minutes or less. A female perfect score is 70 seconds on the flexed arm hang, 100 crunches, and a 21-minute three mile run.

Minimums and Age Adjustment – Male and Female
Age Pull-Ups Flexed Arm Hang Crunches 3-Mile Run
Male Female
17–26 3 15 seconds 50 28:00 31:00
27–39 3 15 seconds 45 29:00 32:00
40–45 3 15 seconds 45 30:00 33:00
46+ 3 15 seconds 40 33:00 36:00

The minimum a 17- to 26-year-old male Marine must complete are 3 pull-ups, 50 crunches, and a 28-minute 3-mile run. The minimum a female Marine in the same age group must complete are 15 seconds on a flexed arm hang, 50 crunches and a 31-minute 3-mile run. Note that merely completing the minimum in each category is not sufficient for passing the test (i.e., one must achieve a passing score and complete at least the minimum in each category in order to pass the test).[2]

References[edit]

 This article incorporates public domain material from websites or documents of the United States Marine Corps.

External links[edit]