United States Mint coin sizes

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The United States Mint has minted over 20 different kinds of coins, of many different sizes. Often, it is difficult for people to get a grasp of what much of the historical coinage looked like, at least in relation to modern circulating coins. This chart shows all of the coin types, and their sizes, grouped by coins of similar size and by general composition.[1]

Seven distinct types of coin composition have been used over the past 200 years: three base coin alloys, two silver alloys, gold, and in recent years, platinum and palladium. The base metal coins were generally alloys of copper (for 2 cent coins and lower), and copper/nickel (for 3 and 5 cent coins). Copper/nickel composition is also used for all modern "silver" coins.[2]

US Coin Sizes and Composition
Steel Alloy Copper Copper Alloy Silver Alloy Silver Gold Platinum Palladium
Three Cent
14 mm
0.8 g
0.750 fine
1851–1853
14 mm
0.75 g
0.900 fine
1854–1873
Half Dime
15.5 mm
1.24 g
1794–1873
Dollar
15 mm
1.67 gr
1849–1889
$5 American Gold Eagle
16.5 mm
3.11 g
1986–present
$10 American Platinum Eagle
16.5 mm
3.11 g
1997–present
Three Cent
17.9 mm
1.94 g
1865-1889
Dime (Clad)
17.91 mm
2.268 g
1965–present
Dime
17.9 mm
2.5 g
1796–1964
$2.50 Gold Quarter Eagle
18 mm
4.2 g
1796–1929
Small Cent
19.05 mm
2.5 g
1943
Small Cent
19.05 mm
3.11 g
1864-1982
Small Cent
19.05 mm
4.67 g
1856-1864
2.5 g
1982–present
Three Dollar
20.5 mm
5.01 g
1853–1876
Nickel
21.21 mm
5 g
1866–present
Nickel
21.21 mm
5 g
1942–1945
Twenty Cent
22 mm
5 g
1875–1878
$5 Half Eagle
21.6 mm
8.36 g
1795–1929
$10 American Gold Eagle
22 mm
7.78 g
1986–present
$25 American Platinum Eagle
22 mm
7.78 g
1997–present
Half Cent
23.5 mm
6.74 g
1795–1857
Two Cent
23 mm
6.22 g
1864-1873
Quarter (Clad)
24.26 mm
5.67 g
1965–present
Quarter (40% Ag)
24.3 mm
5.75 g
1976(S)
Quarter
24.3 mm
6.25 g
1796–1964
Dollar
26.5 mm
8.1 g
1979–Present[3]
$10 Eagle
27 mm
17.5 g
1795–1933
$25 American Gold Eagle
27 mm
17.5 g
1986–present
$50 American Platinum Eagle
27 mm
15.6 g
1997–present
Large Cent
29 mm
10.89 g
1793–1857
Half Dollar (Clad)
30.61 mm
11.34 g
1971–present
Half Dollar (40% Ag)
30.6 mm
11.5 g
1965–1970, 1976(S)
Half Dollar
30.6 mm
12.5 g
1796–1964
$50 American Gold Eagle
32.7 mm
31.1 g
1986–present
$100 American Platinum Eagle
32.7 mm
31.1 g
1997–present
$20 Double Eagle
34 mm
35 g
1849–1933
$25 American Palladium Eagle
34.036 mm
31.120 g
2017–present
Dollar (Clad)
38.1 mm
22.68 g
1971–1978
Dollar (40% Ag)
38.1 mm
24.59 g
1971(S)-1976(S)
Dollar
38.1 mm
26.73 g
1794–1964
$1 American Silver Eagle
40.6 mm
31.1 g
1986–present
Representative images of US coin sizes
Steel Alloy Copper Copper Alloy Silver Alloy Silver Gold Platinum Palladium
3-Cent Silver
Silver Half Dime $5 Gold Bullion $10 Platinum Bullion
Cupronickel 3 Cents Clad Dime Mercury Dime Quarter Eagle
Zinc Coated Steel Wartime Cent 95% Copper Bronze Cent 88% Copper "White Cent" 2.5% Copper Small Cent Three Dollar Piece
Nickel 35% Silver War Nickel Silver 20-cent Coin Half Eagle $10 Gold Bullion $25 Platinum Bullion
Copper Half Cent Copper Two Cent Clad Washington Quarter
Clad Anthony Dollar Eagle $25 Gold Bullion $50 Platinum Bullion
1811 cent obv.jpg Clad Half Dollar 40% Silver Half Dollar Silver Half Dollar
$50 Gold Bullion $100 Platinum Bullion
Clad Eisenhower Dollar 40% Silver Eisenhower Dollar Silver Peace Dollar
NNC-US-1933-G$20-Saint Gaudens.jpg
2017 $25 Palladium obverse.jpg
$1 Silver Bullion

Notes on the tables:

  • Images are close to actual size on a 92-dpi monitor.
  • Clad Half Dollars, Silver Half Dollars and Dollars, and Gold Half Eagles and Eagles are still regularly minted as commemorative coins. Dimes, quarters and half dollars are also struck in 90% silver for special annual collector's sets.
  • The silver-colored Susan B. Anthony dollar was replaced with gold-colored Sacagawea Dollar in 2000 and Presidential Dollars 2007-2016; though the composition changed, the coin's size and weight remain the same.
  • Some variances in coin size and weight occurred over time, especially as the value of silver varied. In particular, many silver coins changed in the 1870s. The figures cited in the tables are representative of the series, and are generally the latest, or most common, figures for a given coin type.

The largest coin ever minted by the US Mint was a gold "Half Union" pattern in 1877, weighing 83.45 grams, and 51.1 mm in diameter. The largest coin actually issued by the mint was the Panama-Pacific Exposition $50 gold commemorative, at 83.572 grams and 44 mm. An octagonal version of the coin was slightly larger, measuring 45 mm at its widest point.

  1. ^ "The United States Mint: Frequently Asked Questions". Retrieved 24 March 2010.
  2. ^ "Coin Composition, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta".
  3. ^ Native American $1 Coin