1958 United States Senate elections

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1958 United States Senate elections

← 1956 November 4, 1958 1960 →

32 of the 98 seats in the United States Senate
50 seats needed for a majority
  Majority party Minority party
  Senator Lyndon Johnson.jpg William F. Knowland headshot.jpg
Leader Lyndon Johnson Bill Knowland
(retired)
Party Democratic Republican
Leader since January 3, 1953 August 4, 1953
Leader's seat Texas California
Seats before 49 47
Seats after 61 35
Seat change Increase 12 Decrease 12
Popular vote 20,620,465 16,180,851
Percentage 55.0% 43.1%
Swing Increase 4.4% Decrease 5.4%
Seats up 12 20
Races won 24 8

Us 1958 senate election map.svg
Results of the elections:
     Democratic gain      Democratic hold
     Republican hold
     No election

Majority Leader before election

Lyndon Johnson
Democratic

Elected Majority Leader

Lyndon B. Johnson
Democratic

The 1958 United States Senate elections were elections for the United States Senate which occurred in the middle of President Dwight D. Eisenhower's second term. As is common in midterm elections, the party in the White House lost seats, but losses this year were more than usual, perhaps due to the high unemployment of the Recession of 1958. The Eisenhower Administration's position on right-to-work issues galvanized labor unions which supported Democrats. The launch of Sputnik may also have been a factor.

The Democratic Party took 12 Republican seats and a special election seat (10 of them by defeating incumbents), and also won both Senate seats in the new state of Alaska. This is the largest swing in the history of the Senate, and is only the second time in U.S. history that 10 or more Senate seats changed hands in a midterm election (after 1946). This election featured the most incumbent Republicans defeated since senators were first popularly elected.[citation needed]

New seats[edit]

New Democratic seats[edit]

  1. Alaska (class 2): won by Bob Bartlett
  2. Alaska (class 3): won by Ernest Gruening

Incumbents retiring[edit]

Democrats[edit]

No Democrats retired.

Republican seats held by Republicans[edit]

  1. New York: Irving Ives, replaced by Kenneth Keating
  2. Pennsylvania: Edward Martin, replaced by Hugh Scott
  3. Vermont: Ralph Flanders, replaced by Winston L. Prouty

Republicans replaced by Democrats[edit]

  1. California: William Knowland, replaced by Clair Engle
  2. Indiana: William E. Jenner, replaced by Vance Hartke
  3. New Jersey: Howard Alexander Smith, replaced by Harrison A. Williams

Incumbents who lost re-election (or appointee who lost election)[edit]

Democrats replaced by Republicans[edit]

No Democrats lost re-election.

Republicans replaced by Democrats[edit]

West Virginia's delegation changed from two Republicans to two Democrats.

  1. Connecticut: William A. Purtell, lost to Thomas J. Dodd
  2. Maine: Frederick G. Payne, lost to Edmund Muskie
  3. Michigan: Charles E. Potter, lost to Philip Hart
  4. Minnesota: Edward John Thye, lost to Eugene McCarthy
  5. Nevada: George W. Malone, lost to Howard Cannon
  6. Ohio: John W. Bricker, lost to Stephen M. Young
  7. Utah: Arthur Vivian Watkins, lost to Frank Moss
  8. West Virginia: Chapman Revercomb, lost to Robert Byrd
  9. West Virginia (class 2): John D. Hoblitzell Jr., lost to Jennings Randolph
  10. Wyoming: Frank A. Barrett, lost to Gale W. McGee

Results summary[edit]

For the November 5 and 25, 1958 general and special elections.

Colored shading indicates party with largest share of that row.

Parties Total
Democratic Republican
Before these elections 49 47 96
Not up 37 26 63
Class 2 (1954) 20 11 31
Class 3 (1956) 17 15 32
Up 12 21 33
General: Class 1 12 20 32
Special: Class 2 1 1
Special: Class 3 0
Incumbent retired 6 6
Held by same party 3 3
Replaced by other party Decrease3 Republicans replaced by Increase3 Democrats IncreaseDecrease3
Result 3 3 6
Incumbent ran 12 15 27
Won re-election 12 5 17
Lost re-election Decrease10 Republicans replaced by Increase10 Democrats IncreaseDecrease10
Lost renomination
but held by same party
Result 22 5 27
New state 2 2
Total elected 27 8 35
Net change Increase15 Decrease13 Increase2
Result 64 34 98

Change in composition[edit]

Before the elections[edit]

  D1 D2 D3 D4 D5 D6 D7 D8 D9
D19 D18 D17 D16 D15 D14 D13 D12 D11 D10
D20 D21 D22 D23 D24 D25 D27 D26 D28 D29
D39
Miss.
Ran
D38
Mass.
Ran
D37
Fla.
Ran
D36 D35 D34 D33 D32 D31 D30
D40
Mo.
Ran
D41
Mont.
Ran
D42
N.M.
Ran
D43
N.C. (sp)
Ran
D44
R.I.
Ran
D45
Tenn.
Ran
D46
Texas
Ran
D47
Va.
Ran
D48
Wash.
Ran
D49
Wis.
Ran
Majority ↑ TBD1
Alaska
New state
R40
N.D.
Ran
R41
Ohio
Ran
R42
Pa.
Retired
R43
Utah
Ran
R44
Vt.
Retired
R45
W.Va.
Ran
R46
W.Va. (sp)
Ran
R47
Wyo.
Ran
TBD2
Alaska
New state
R39
N.Y.
Retired
R38
N.J.
Retired
R37
Nev.
Ran
R36
Neb.
Ran
R35
Minn.
Ran
R34
Mich.
Ran
R33
Md.
Ran
R32
Maine
Retired
R31
Ind.
Retired
R30
Del.
Ran
R20 R21 R22 R23 R24 R25 R26 R27
Ariz.
Ran
R28
Calif.
Retired
R29
Conn.
Ran
R19 R18 R17 R16 R15 R14 R13 R12 R11 R10
  R1 R2 R3 R4 R5 R6 R7 R8 R9

After the elections[edit]

  D1 D2 D3 D4 D5 D6 D7 D8 D9
D19 D18 D17 D16 D15 D14 D13 D12 D11 D10
D20 D21 D22 D23 D24 D25 D26 D27 D28 D29
D39
Calif.
Gain
D38
Alaska
Gain
D37
Alaska
Gain
D36 D35 D34 D33 D32 D31 D30
D40
Conn.
Gain
D41
Fla.
Re-elected
D42
Ind.
Gain
D43
Mass.
Re-elected
D44
Maine
Gain
D45
Mich.
Gain
D46
Minn.
Gain
D47
Miss.
Re-elected
D48
Mo.
Re-elected
D49
Mont.
Re-elected
Majority → D50
Nev.
Gain
D59
Va.
Re-elected
D58
Utah
Gain
D57
Texas
Re-elected
D56
Tenn.
Re-elected
D55
R.I.
Re-elected
D54
Ohio
Gain
D53
N.C. (sp)
Elected[a]
D52
N.M.
Re-elected
D51
N.J.
Gain
D60
Wash.
Re-elected
D61
Wis.
Re-elected
D62
W.Va.
Gain
D63
W.Va. (sp)
Gain
D64
Wyo.
Gain
R34
Vt.
Hold
R33
Pa.
Hold
R32
N.D.
Re-elected
R31
N.Y.
Hold
R30
Neb.
Re-elected
R20 R21 R22 R23 R24 R25 R26 R27
Ariz.
Re-elected
R28
Del.
Re-elected
R29
Md.
Re-elected
R19 R18 R17 R16 R15 R14 R13 R12 R11 R10
  R1 R2 R3 R4 R5 R6 R7 R8 R9
Key:
D# Democratic
R# Republican

Race summaries[edit]

Special / New state elections[edit]

In the special elections, the winners were seated during 1958 or before January 3, 1959. In the new state elections, the winner were seated with the new Congress on January 3, 1959. Ordered by election date.

State Incumbent Results Candidates
Senator Party Electoral history
North Carolina
(class 2)
B. Everett Jordan Democratic 1958 (Appointed) Interim appointee elected November 4, 1958.
West Virginia
(class 2)
John D. Hoblitzell Jr. Republican 1958 (Appointed) Interim appointee lost election.
New senator elected November 4, 1958.
Democratic gain.
Alaska
(class 2)
Alaska admitted as a state January 3, 1959. New state.
New senator elected November 25, 1958.
Democratic gain.
Alaska
(class 3)
Alaska admitted as a state January 3, 1959. New state.
New senator elected November 25, 1958.
Democratic gain.

Elections leading to the next Congress[edit]

In these general elections, the winners were elected for the term beginning January 3, 1959; ordered by state.

All of the elections involved the Class 1 seats.

State Incumbent Results Candidates
Senator Party Electoral history
Arizona Barry Goldwater Republican 1952 Incumbent re-elected.
California William Knowland Republican 1945 (Appointed)
1946 (Special)
1952
Incumbent retired to run for California Governor.
New senator elected.
Democratic gain.
Connecticut William A. Purtell Republican 1952 (Appointed)
1952 (Retired)
1952
Incumbent lost re-election.
New senator elected.
Democratic gain.
Delaware John J. Williams Republican 1946
1952
Incumbent re-elected.
Florida Spessard Holland Democratic 1946 (Appointed)
1946
1952
Incumbent re-elected.
Indiana William E. Jenner Republican 1944 (Special)
1946
1952
Incumbent retired.
New senator elected.
Democratic gain.
Maine Frederick G. Payne Republican 1952 Incumbent lost re-election.
New senator elected.
Democratic gain.
Maryland James Glenn Beall Republican 1952 Incumbent re-elected.
Massachusetts John F. Kennedy Democratic 1952 Incumbent re-elected.
Michigan Charles E. Potter Republican 1952 (Special)
1952
Incumbent lost re-election.
New senator elected.
Democratic gain.
Minnesota Edward John Thye Republican 1946
1952
Incumbent lost re-election.
New senator elected.
Democratic gain.
Mississippi John C. Stennis Democratic 1947 (Special)
1952
Incumbent re-elected.
Missouri Stuart Symington Democratic 1952 Incumbent re-elected.
Montana Mike Mansfield Democratic 1952 Incumbent re-elected.
Nebraska Roman Hruska Republican 1954 (Special) Incumbent re-elected.
Nevada George W. Malone Republican 1946
1952
Incumbent lost re-election.
New senator elected.
Democratic gain.
New Jersey Howard Alexander Smith Republican 1944 (Special)
1946
1952
Incumbent retired.
New senator elected.
Democratic gain.
New Mexico Dennis Chávez Democratic 1935 (Appointed)
1936 (Special)
1940
1946
1952
Incumbent re-elected.
New York Irving Ives Republican 1946
1952
Incumbent retired.
New senator elected.
Republican hold.
North Dakota William Langer Republican 1940
1946
1952
Incumbent re-elected.
Ohio John W. Bricker Republican 1946
1952
Incumbent lost re-election.
New senator elected.
Democratic gain.
Pennsylvania Edward Martin Republican 1946
1952
Incumbent retired.
New senator elected.
Republican hold.
Rhode Island John Pastore Democratic 1950 (Special)
1952
Incumbent re-elected.
Tennessee Albert Gore Sr. Democratic 1952 Incumbent re-elected.
Texas Ralph Yarborough Democratic 1957 (Special) Incumbent re-elected.
Utah Arthur Vivian Watkins Republican 1946
1952
Incumbent lost re-election.
New senator elected.
Democratic gain.
Vermont Ralph Flanders Republican 1946 (Appointed)
1946 (Special)
1952
Incumbent retired.
New senator elected.
Republican hold.
Virginia Harry F. Byrd Democratic 1933 (Appointed)
1933 (Special)
1934
1940
1946
1952
Incumbent re-elected.
Washington Henry M. Jackson Democratic 1952 Incumbent re-elected.
West Virginia Chapman Revercomb Republican 1942
1948 (Lost)
1956 (Special)
Incumbent lost re-election.
New senator elected.
Democratic gain.
Wisconsin William Proxmire Democratic 1957 (Special) Incumbent re-elected.
Wyoming Frank A. Barrett Republican 1952 Incumbent lost re-election.
New senator elected.
Democratic gain.

Alaska[edit]

Alaska would become a new state January 3, 1959 and it elected two initial senators November 25, 1958 in advance of statehood. The Democratic Party thereby picked up 2 more seats.

In their next elections, Alaska's senators would be elected to 6-year terms.

Senator Bob Bartlett

The class 2 race, for the 2-year term ending in 1961, was between the Democratic incumbent territorial delegate Bob Bartlett, and the Republican Juneau attorney R. E. Robertson.

Alaska general election (class 2)[1][2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Bob Bartlett 40,939 83.83%
Republican R. E. Robertson 7,299 14.95%
Write-In Keith Capper 599 1.23%
Majority 33,640 68.88%
Turnout 48,837
Democratic win (new seat)

Bartlett would be re-elected twice and serve until his 1968 death.

The class 3 race, for the 4-year term ending in 1963, pitted two former territorial governors, Democrat Ernest Gruening against Republican Mike Stepovich. Gruening won a close race.

Alaska general election (class 3)[1][3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Ernest Gruening 26,045 52.61%
Republican Mike Stepovich 23,464 47.39%
Majority 2,581 5.22%
Turnout 49,509
Democratic win (new seat)

Gruening would be re-elected in 1962 and serve until losing renomination in 1968.

Arizona[edit]

Arizona election

← 1952
1964 →
  Barry Goldwater photo1962.jpg Mcfarland ernest.jpg
Nominee Barry Goldwater Ernest McFarland
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote 164,593 129,030
Percentage 56.06% 43.94%

U.S. senator before election

Barry Goldwater
Republican

Elected U.S. senator

Barry Goldwater
Republican

Arizona general election 1958[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Barry Goldwater (Incumbent) 164,593 56.06%
Democratic Ernest W. McFarland 129,030 43.94%
Majority 35,563 12.12%
Turnout 293,623
Republican hold

California[edit]

California election

← 1952
1964 →
  Clair Engle.jpg GoodwinKnight.jpg
Nominee Clair Engle Goodwin Knight
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 2,927,693 2,204,337
Percentage 57.01% 42.93%

U.S. senator before election

William F. Knowland
Republican

Elected U.S. senator

Clair Engle
Democratic

California general election 1958[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Clair Engle 2,927,693 57.01%
Republican Goodwin Knight (Incumbent) 2,204,337 42.93%
Write-In Jesse M. Ritchie 892 0.02%
Write-In Ray B. Pollard 281 0.01%
None Scattering 2,018 0.04%
Majority 723,356 14.08%
Turnout 5,135,221
Democratic gain from Republican

Connecticut[edit]

Connecticut election

← 1952
1964 →
  Thomasjdodd.jpg William Arthur Purtell.jpg
Nominee Thomas J. Dodd William A. Purtell
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 554,841 410,622
Percentage 57.29% 42.40%

U.S. senator before election

William A. Purtell
Republican

Elected U.S. senator

Thomas J. Dodd
Democratic

In Connecticut, Democrat Thomas J. Dodd defeated incumbent senator William A. Purtell who ran for a second term.

Connecticut general election 1958[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Thomas J. Dodd 554,841 57.28%
Republican William A. Purtell 410,622 42.39%
Independent Vivien Kellems 3,043 0.31%
None Scattering 119 0.01%
Majority 144,219 14.89%
Turnout 968,625
Swing to Democratic from Republican Swing

Delaware[edit]

Two-term Republican John J. Williams was re-elected to a third term.

Delaware general election 1958[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican John J. Williams (Incumbent) 82,280 53.28%
Democratic Elbert Carvel 72,152 46.72%
Majority 10,128 6.56%
Turnout 154,432
Republican hold

Williams would be re-elected in 1964, serving four terms until his 1970 retirement.

Florida[edit]

Florida election

← 1952
1964 →
  Spessard Holland.JPG 3x4.svg
Nominee Spessard Holland Leland Hyzer
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 386,113 155,956
Percentage 71.23% 28.77%

Florida Senate Election Results by County, 1958.svg
County Results
Holland:      50–60%      60–70%      70–80%      80–90%      >90%

U.S. senator before election

Spessard Holland
Democratic

Elected U.S. senator

Spessard Holland
Democratic

Incumbent Democrat Senator Holland, a conservative, was challenged by former senator Claude Pepper, who had been unseated in 1950. Holland had played a role in recruiting George A. Smathers to run against the liberal Pepper in that election. The two served as colleagues in the Senate from 1947 to 1951.[5]

Democratic primary[6]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Spessard L. Holland (Incumbent) 408,084 55.94%
Democratic Claude Pepper 321,377 44.06%
Total votes 729,461 100.00%
General election results[7]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Spessard Holland (Incumbent) 386,113 71.23% Decrease28.59
Republican Leland Hyzer 155,956 28.77% Increase28.77
Majority 230,157 42.46%
Turnout 542,069
Democratic hold

Indiana[edit]

Indiana election

← 1952
1964 →
  Vance Hartke.jpg 3x4.svg
Nominee Vance Hartke Harold W. Handley
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 973,636 731,635
Percentage 56.46% 42.42%

U.S. senator before election

William E. Jenner
Republican

Elected U.S. senator

Vance Hartke
Democratic

Incumbent Republican William E. Jenner did not seek a second full term in office and was replaced by Democrat Vance Hartke, the mayor of Evansville. Hartke defeated incumbent Republican Governor of Indiana Harold W. Handley.

Jenner resigned shortly before the election and urged Handley, Jenner's political protégé, to seek his seat. A plan was proposed whereby Handley would resign the governorship, his lieutenant would appoint him senator, and he would finish the term and run as an incumbent. When the plan was revealed to the party leadership, they strongly advised him to not implement the it because they feared it would hurt the party and be perceived as a scandal.[8]

Handley did not resign from the governorship during his campaign and was widely criticized for the unprecedented action. Hartke accused Handley of raising taxes, breaking of his campaign promise, his reluctance in supporting right-to-work, and rising state unemployment. Statewide unemployment was just above 10% in April, but dropped to 6.9% by the end of September.[8]

Indiana general election 1958[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Vance Hartke 973,636 56.47%
Republican Harold W. Handley 731,635 42.43%
Prohibition John Stelle 19,040 1.10%
Majority 242,001 14.04%
Turnout 1,724,311
Democratic gain from Republican

Maine[edit]

Maine election

← 1952 September 8, 1958 1964 →
  Edmund Muskie.jpg Frederick George Payne.jpg
Nominee Edmund Muskie Frederick G. Payne
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 172,704 111,522
Percentage 60.76% 39.24%

U.S. senator before election

Frederick G. Payne
Republican

Elected U.S. senator

Edmund Muskie
Democratic

Maine held its election September 8, 1958, in keeping with its routine practice of holding elections before the November national Election Day. Democrat Edmund Muskie defeated one-term Republican incumbent, Frederick G. Payne by a wide margin, 61–39%.

Maine general election 1958[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Edmund Muskie 172,704 60.76%
Republican Frederick G. Payne (Incumbent) 111,522 39.24%
Majority 61,182 21.52%
Turnout 284,226
Democratic gain from Republican

Maryland[edit]

Maryland election

← 1952
1964 →
  Jamesglennbeall.jpg Thomas D'Alesandro Jr.jpg
Nominee James Glenn Beall Thomas D'Alesandro
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote 384,931 367,142
Percentage 51.18% 48.82

Maryland Senate Election Results by County, 1958.svg
County
Beall:      50–60%      60–70%
D'Alesandro:      50–60%

U.S. senator before election

James Glenn Beall
Republican

Elected U.S. senator

James Glenn Beall
Republican

Maryland general election 1958[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican James Glenn Beall (Incumbent) 384,931 51.18%
Democratic Thomas D'Alesandro 367,142 48.82%
Majority 17,789 3.36%
Turnout 752,073
Republican hold

Massachusetts[edit]

Massachusetts election

  Jfk2.jpg 3x4.svg
Nominee John F. Kennedy Vincent Celeste
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 1,362,926 488,318
Percentage 73.20% 26.23%

1958 US Senate election in Massachusetts results by municipality.svg
Municipal results

U.S. senator before election

John F. Kennedy
Democratic

Elected U.S. senator

John F. Kennedy
Democratic

Massachusetts general election 1958[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic John F. Kennedy (Incumbent) 1,362,926 73.20%
Republican Vincent J. Celeste 488,318 26.22%
Socialist Labor Lawrence Gilfedder 5,457 0.29%
Prohibition Mark R. Shaw 5,335 0.29%
None Scattering 5 0.00%
Majority 874,608 46.98%
Turnout 1,862,041
Democratic hold

Michigan[edit]

Michigan election

← 1952
1964 →
  Philip A Hart.jpg Charles Edward Potter.jpg
Nominee Philip Hart Charles E. Potter
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 1,216,966 1,046,963
Percentage 53.57% 46.09%

U.S. senator before election

Charles E. Potter
Republican

Elected U.S. senator

Philip Hart
Democratic

Michigan general election 1958[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Philip A. Hart 1,216,966 53.57%
Republican Charles E. Potter (Incumbent) 1,046,963 46.09%
Prohibition Elmer H. Ormiston 3,518 0.15%
Socialist Labor James Sim 3,128 0.14%
Socialist Workers Evelyn Sell 1,068 0.05%
None Scattering 1 0.00%
Majority 170,003 7.48%
Turnout 2,271,644
Democratic gain from Republican

Minnesota[edit]

Minnesota election

← 1952
1964 →
  EugeneMcCarthy.jpg EdwardThye.jpg
Nominee Eugene J. McCarthy Edward John Thye
Party Democratic (DFL) Republican
Popular vote 608,847 535,629
Percentage 52.95% 46.58%

MNSenate58.svg
County results

U.S. senator before election

Edward John Thye
Republican

Elected U.S. senator

Eugene J. McCarthy
Democratic (DFL)

In Minnesota, Democratic Representative Eugene McCarthy defeated incumbent senator Edward John Thye who ran for a third term.

Democratic primary election[9]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic (DFL) Eugene J. McCarthy 279,796 75.65%
Democratic (DFL) Hjalmar Petersen 76,340 20.64%
Democratic (DFL) Hans R. Miller 13,736 3.71%
Total votes 369,872 100.00%
Republican primary election[10]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Edward John Thye (Incumbent) 224,833 91.81%
Republican Edward C. Slettedahl 13,734 5.61%
Republican Mrs. Peder P. Schmidt 6,332 2.58%
Total votes 244,899 100.00%
General election[11]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic (DFL) Eugene J. McCarthy 608,847 52.95%
Republican Edward John Thye (Incumbent) 535,629 46.58%
Socialist Workers William M. Curran 5,407 0.47%
Total votes 1,149,883 100.00%
Majority 73,218 6.37%
Democratic (DFL) gain from Republican

Mississippi[edit]

Two-term Democrat John C. Stennis was re-elected with no opposition.

Mississippi general election 1958[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic John C. Stennis (Incumbent) 61,039 100.00%
Democratic hold

Stennis would be re-elected four more times, serving until his retirement in 1989.

Missouri[edit]

Missouri election

← 1952 November 4, 1958 1964 →
  Stuart Symington.jpg 3x4.svg
Nominee Stuart Symington Hazel Palmer
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 780,083 393,847
Percentage 66.45% 33.55%

U.S. senator before election

Stuart Symington
Democratic

Elected U.S. senator

Stuart Symington
Democratic

Incumbent Democrat Stuart Symington was re-elected to a second term. Hazel Palmer was the first woman ever nominated for United States senator in Missouri.

Democratic primary[12]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Stuart Symington (incumbent) 365,470 92.13%
Democratic Lawrence Hastings 19,954 5.03%
Democratic Lamar Dye 11,262 2.84%
Total votes 396,686 100.00%
Republican primary[13]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Hazel Palmer 61,481 44.63%
Republican William McKinley Thomas 36,438 26.45%
Republican Homer Cotton 27,023 19.62%
Republican Herman G. Grosby 12,818 9.31%
Total votes 137,760 100.00%
General election[1][14]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Stuart Symington (Incumbent) 780,083 66.45% Increase12.46
Republican Hazel Palmer 393,847 33.55% Decrease12.39
Majority 386,236 32.90%
Turnout 1,173,930
Democratic hold Swing

Montana[edit]

Montana election

← 1952
1964 →
  Michael Joseph Mansfield.jpg No image.svg
Nominee Mike Mansfield Lou Welch
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 174,910 54,573
Percentage 76.22% 23.78%

U.S. senator before election

Mike Mansfield
Democratic

Elected U.S. senator

Mike Mansfield
Democratic

Incumbent Mike Mansfield, who was first elected to the Senate in 1952, ran for re-election. Mansfield won the Democratic primary comfortably, and moved on to the general election, where he was opposed by Lou W. Welch, a millworker and the Republican nominee. In contrast to the close campaign in 1952, Mansfield defeated Welch in a landslide and won his second term in the Senate easily.

Democratic primary[15]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Mike Mansfield (Incumbent) 97,207 91.72%
Democratic J. M. Nickey 4,710 4.44%
Democratic Thomas G. Stimatz, former State Representative 4,061 3.83%
Total votes 105,978 100.00%
Republican Primary[15]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Lou W. Welch, millworker 19,860 50.30%
Republican Blanche Anderson 19,624 49.70%
Total votes 39,484 100.00%
General election[16]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Mike Mansfield (Incumbent) 174,910 76.22% Increase25.47%
Republican Lou W. Welch 54,573 23.78% Decrease24.77%
Majority 120,337 52.44% Increase50.25%
Turnout 229,483
Democratic hold Swing

Nebraska[edit]

Senator Roman Hruska

Republican Roman Hruska had won a 1954 special election and ran for a full term. He beat Democratic attorney Frank B. Morrison.

Nebraska general election 1958[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Roman Hruska (Incumbent) 232,227 55.64%
Democratic Frank B. Morrison 185,152 44.36%
Majority 47,075 11.18%
Turnout 417,379
Republican hold

Hruska would be re-elected two more times and serve until his 1976 retirement.

Morrison would be elected Governor of Nebraska in 1960 and serve there for six years, twice again meanwhile running unsuccessfully for U.S. senator.

Nevada[edit]

Nevada election

← 1952
1964 →
  Howard Cannon.jpg George malone.jpg
Nominee Howard Cannon George W. Malone
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 48,732 35,760
Percentage 57.65% 42.32%

Nevada Senate Election Results by County, 1958.svg
County
Cannon:      50–60%      60–70%
Malone:      50-60%      60-70%

U.S. senator before election

George W. Malone
Republican

Elected U.S. senator

Howard Cannon
Democratic

In Nevada, incumbent Republican George W. Malone ran for re-election to a third term, but was defeated by Democrat Howard Cannon.

The campaign was considered[by whom?] one of the most competitive and highly watched in the nation in 1958. Senator Malone was known nationally as a leader within the Republican Party's right wing and held key appointments on the Senate Finance and Interior Committees.[17]

Malone campaigned on his experience and seniority in the Senate, using the slogan "He Knows Nevada Best." He received support from Eisenhower cabinet secretaries Fred Seaton and Ezra Taft Benson. Benson, one of the Twelve Apostles of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, was especially influential among Nevada's large Mormon population. His endorsement was seen as particularly important in light of Cannon's Mormon faith. Late in the campaign, Malone published full-page ads touting his effort to save Nevada from a federal gambling tax.[17]

Cannon focused his attacks on Malone's absentee record in the Senate and his reputation on Capitol Hill as an unpopular extremist.[17]

Cannon won the election by a safe margin owing to his overwhelming support in his native Clark County, which contained 47 percent of the state's registered voters. He was the first candidate from southern Nevada elected to the United States Senate.[17]

Democratic primary[18]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Howard Cannon 22,787 51.66%
Democratic Fred Anderson 21,319 48.34%
Total votes 44,106 {{{percentage}}}

Senator Malone was unopposed for re-nomination by the Republican Party.

General election[16]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Howard Cannon, City Attorney of Las Vegas 48,732 57.65% Increase7.63%
Republican George W. Malone (Incumbent) 35,760 42.32% Decrease9.35%
Majority 12,972 15.35% Increase12.00%
Turnout 84,492
Democratic gain from Republican Swing

New Jersey[edit]

New Jersey election

← 1952
1964 →
  Harrison Williams(D-NJ).jpg KEANROBERTWIN.jpg
Nominee Harrison Williams Robert Kean
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 966,832 882,287
Percentage 51.39% 46.90%

New Jersey Senate Election, 1958.svg
County
Williams:      40–50%      50–60%      60–70%
Kean:      40-50%      50-60%      60-70%

U.S. senator before election

H. Alexander Smith
Republican

Elected U.S. senator

Harrison Williams
Democratic

Incumbent Republican H. Alexander Smith chose not to seek a third term in office. Democratic U.S. Representative Harrison Williams won the open seat over U.S. Representative Robert Kean.

Democratic primary[19]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Harrison A. Williams 152,413 43.12%
Democratic John Grogan 139,605 39.49%
Democratic Joseph E. McLean 61,478 17.39%
Total votes 353,496 100.00%
Republican primary[20]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Robert Kean 152,884 43.00%
Republican Bernard M. Shanley 128,990 36.28%
Republican Robert J. Morris 73,658 20.72%
Total votes 355,532 100.00%
General election[21]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Harrison A. Williams 966,832 51.39% Increase7.77
Republican Robert Kean 882,287 46.90% Decrease8.61
Socialist Workers Daniel Roberts 11,669 0.62% Increase0.40
Politicians Are Jokers Henry Krajewski 6,013 0.32% N/A
Independent John J. Winberry 5,481 0.29% N/A
Conservative Winifred O. Perry 3,062 0.16% N/A
People's Choice John M. D'Addetta 3,024 0.16% N/A
Socialist Labor Albert Ronis 2,935 0.16% Increase0.09
Total votes 1,881,303 100.00%
Democratic gain from Republican

New Mexico[edit]

New Mexico general election 1958[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Dennis Chavez (Incumbent) 127,496 62.71%
Republican Forrest S. Atchley 75,827 37.29%
Majority 51,669 25.42%
Turnout 203,323
Democratic hold

New York[edit]

New York election

← 1952
1964 →
  Senator Kenneth Keating (cropped).jpg 3x4.svg
Nominee Kenneth Keating Frank Hogan
Party Republican Democratic
Alliance Liberal
Popular vote 2,842,942 2,434,899
Percentage 50.75% 48.38%

U.S. senator before election

Irving Ives
Republican

Elected U.S. senator

Kenneth Keating
Republican

Incumbent Republican Irving Ives retired. Republican Representative Kenneth Keating defeated Democrat Frank Hogan to succeed Ives.

1958 Democratic Convention[22]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Frank Hogan 772 67.60%
Democratic Thomas E. Murray Sr. 304 26.62%
Democratic Thomas K. Finletter 66 5.78%
Total votes 1,317 100.00%
General election[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Kenneth Keating 2,842,942 50.75%
Democratic Frank Hogan 2,709,950 48.37%
Independent Socialist Corliss Lamont 49,087 0.88%
None Scattering 95 0.00%
Majority 132,992 2.38%
Turnout 5,601,979
Republican hold

North Carolina (Special)[edit]

Democrat W. Kerr Scott had died April 16, 1958 and former Democratic Governor of North Carolina B. Everett Jordan was appointed April 19, 1958 to continue the term, pending a special election. Jordan was then re-elected in November.

General election[23]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic B. Everett Jordan 431,492 70.0%
Republican Richard C. Clarke Jr. 184,977 30.0%
Turnout 15.18%
Democratic hold

Jordan would later be twice re-elected and serve until 1973.

North Dakota[edit]

North Dakota election

← 1952
1960 →
  William Langer.jpg No image.svg
Nominee William Langer Raymond Vendsel
Party Republican Democratic-NPL
Popular vote 117,070 84,892
Percentage 57.21% 41.49%

North Dakota Senate Election Results by County, 1958.png
U.S. Senate election results map.
Red denotes those won by Langer.
Blue denotes counties won by Vendsel.

U.S. senator before election

William Langer
Republican

Elected U.S. senator

William Langer
Republican

Incumbent Republican, and former Non-Partisan League (NPL) senator, William Langer, was re-elected to a fourth term, defeating North Dakota Democratic NPL Party (Dem-NPL) candidate Raymond G. Vendsel.[16]

Only Langer filed as a Republican, and the endorsed Democratic-NPL candidate was Raymond G. Vendsel. Langer and Vendsel won the primary elections for their respective parties.

Two independent candidates, Arthur C. Townley and Custer Solem, also filed before the deadline but had minimal impact on the outcome of the election, totaling less than 3,000 votes combined. Townley was known as the creator of the National Non-Partisan League, and had previously sought North Dakota's other senate seat in 1956.

North Dakota election
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican William Langer (Incumbent) 117,070 57.21%
Democratic Raymond G. Vendsel 84,892 41.49%
Independent Arthur C. Townley 1,700 0.83%
Independent Custer Solem 973 0.48%
Majority 32,178 15.72%
Turnout 204,635
Republican hold

Ohio[edit]

Ohio election

← 1952
1964 →
  Stephen M. Young 87th Congress 1961.jpg John W. Bricker cph.3b31299.jpg
Nominee Stephen M. Young John W. Bricker
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 1,652,211 1,497,199
Percentage 52.46% 47.54%

U.S. senator before election

John W. Bricker
Republican

Elected U.S. senator

Stephen M. Young
Democratic

Incumbent Republican John W. Bricker was defeated in his bid for a third term by U.S. Representative Stephen M. Young.

General election[24]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Stephen M. Young 1,652,211 52.46% Increase7.04
Republican John W. Bricker (Incumbent) 1,497,199 47.54% Decrease7.05
Majority 155,012 4.92%
Turnout 3,149,410
Democratic gain from Republican

Pennsylvania[edit]

Senator Hugh Scott

Incumbent Republican Edward Martin did not seek re-election. The Republican nominee, Hugh Scott, defeated the term-limited Democratic Governor of Pennsylvania George M. Leader for the vacant seat.

General election[16]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Hugh Scott 2,042,586 51.21% Decrease0.37%
Democratic George M. Leader 1,929,821 48.38% Increase0.40%
Socialist Labor George S. Taylor 10,431 0.26% Increase0.26%
Socialist Workers Ethel Peterson 5,742 0.14% Increase0.14%
N/A Other 42 0.00% N/A
Majority 112,765 2.83%
Turnout 3,988,622
Republican hold Swing

Scott would be twice re-elected, rising to the Senate Minority leader, and serve until retiring in 1977. Leader retired from public service after the defeat.

Rhode Island[edit]

Senator John Pastore

Two-term incumbent Democrat John Pastore was easily re-elected over Republican attorney Bayard Ewing,[25] a repeat of their 1952 race.

Rhode Island general election 1958[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic John Pastore (Incumbent) 222,166 64.49%
Republican Bayard Ewing 122,353 35.51%
Majority 99,813 28.98%
Turnout 344,519
Democratic hold

Ewing would later serve as the national chairman of the United Way (1969–1972) and the Rhode Island School of Design (1967–1985).

Tennessee[edit]

Tennessee general election 1958[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Albert Gore Sr. (Incumbent) 317,324 79.00%
Republican Hobart F. Atkins 76,371 19.01%
Write-In Chester W. Mason 5,324 1.33%
Write-In Thomas Gouge Jr. 2,646 0.66%
Majority 240,953 59.99%
Turnout 401,665
Democratic hold

Texas[edit]

Texas general election 1958[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Ralph Yarborough (Incumbent) 587,030 74.58%
Republican Roy Whittenburg 185,926 23.62%
Write-In Bard W. Logan 14,172 1.80%
Majority 401,104 50.96%
Turnout 787,128
Democratic hold

Utah[edit]

Utah general election 1958[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Frank Moss 112,827 38.73%
Republican Arthur V. Watkins (Incumbent) 101,471 34.83%
Independent J. Bracken Lee 77,013 26.44%
Majority 11,356 3.90%
Turnout 291,311
Democratic gain from Republican

Vermont[edit]

Incumbent Republican Ralph Flanders did not run for re-election to another term in the United States Senate. Republican candidate Winston L. Prouty defeated Democratic candidate Frederick J. Fayette to succeed him.

Republican primary[26]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Winston L. Prouty 31,866 64.6%
Republican Lee E. Emerson 17,468 35.4%
Republican Other 4 0.0%
Total votes 49,338 100.00%
Democratic primary[26]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Frederick J. Fayette 6,546 99.5%
Democratic Other 32 0.5%
Total votes 6,578 100.00%
General election[27]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Winston L. Prouty 64,900 52.15%
Democratic Frederick J. Fayette 59,536 47.84%
N/A Other 6 0.00%
Majority 5,364 4.31%
Total votes 124,442 100.00%
Republican hold

Virginia[edit]

Incumbent Harry F. Byrd Sr. was re-elected after defeating Independent Louise Wensel and Social Democrat Clarke Robb.

General election[16]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Harry F. Byrd Sr. (Incumbent) 317,221 69.32% Decrease4.03%
Independent Louise Wensel 120,224 26.27% Increase26.27%
Social Democratic Clarke T. Robb 20,154 4.40% Decrease7.98%
write-ins 41 0.01% Decrease1.54%
Majority 196,997 43.05%
Turnout 457,640
Democratic hold

Washington[edit]

Washington general election 1958[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Henry M. Jackson (Incumbent) 597,040 67.32%
Republican William B. Bantz 278,271 31.38%
Socialist Labor Henry Killman 7,592 0.86%
Constitution Archie G. Idso 2,257 0.25%
United Liberals and Socialists Jay G. Sykes 1,662 0.19%
Majority 318,769 35.94%
Turnout 886,822
Democratic hold

West Virginia[edit]

West Virginia (General)[edit]

West Virginia election

  Robert C. Byrd – 1967.jpg WilliamCRevercomb.jpg
Nominee Robert Byrd William Revercomb
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 381,745 263,172
Percentage 59.19% 40.81%

West Virginia Senate Election Results by County, 1958.svg
County results
Byrd:      50–60%      60–70%      70–80%
Revercomb:      50–60%      60–70%      70–80%

U.S. senator before election

William Revercomb
Republican

Elected U.S. Senator

Robert Byrd
Democratic

In 1956 senator Harley M. Kilgore died, and former senator William Revercomb won his seat in the 1956 special election. Revercomb lost re-election to Robert Byrd, who would hold the seat until his 2010 death.

1958 United States Senate election in West Virginia
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Robert Byrd 381,745 64.4% +18.39%
Republican William Revercomb (Incumbent) 263,172 40.81% -18.39%
Total votes 644,917 100.00% -21.5%
Democratic gain from Republican

West Virginia (Special)[edit]

West Virginia special election

  Jennings Randolph headshot.jpg JohnDHoblitzell.jpg
Nominee Jennings Randolph John D. Hoblitzell Jr.
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 374,167 256,510
Percentage 59.32% 39.77%

U.S. senator before election

John D. Hoblitzell Jr.
Republican

Elected U.S. Senator

Jennings Randolph
Democratic

Incumbent Democrat Matthew M. Neely died January 8, 1958 and Republican John D. Hoblitzell Jr. was appointed January 25, 1958 to continue the term, pending a special election.

Former Democratic congressman Jennings Randolph was elected to finish the term that would run through 1961.

West Virginia special election[29]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Jennings Randolph 374,167 59.32%
Republican John D. Hoblitzell Jr. 256,510 39.77%
Total votes 630,677 100%

Randolph would be re-elected four times and serve until his retirement in 1985. Hoblitzell resumed his business interests and died January 6, 1962.

Wisconsin[edit]

Wisconsin general election 1958[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic William Proxmire (Incumbent) 682,440 57.12%
Republican Roland J. Steinle 510,398 42.72%
Socialist Workers James E. Boulton 1,226 0.10%
Socialist Labor Georgia Cozzini 537 0.04%
None Scattering 77 0.01%
Majority 171,042 14.40%
Turnout 1,194,678
Democratic hold

Wyoming[edit]

Wyoming general election 1958[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Gale McGee 58,035 50.84%
Republican Frank A. Barrett (Incumbent) 56,122 49.16%
Majority 1,913 1.68%
Turnout 114,157
Democratic gain from Republican

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Appointee elected

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 4, 1958" (PDF). Clerk.house.gov. Retrieved May 6, 2019.
  2. ^ "Our Campaigns - AK US Senate Race - Nov 25, 1958". www.ourcampaigns.com. Retrieved June 12, 2020.
  3. ^ "Our Campaigns - AK US Senate Race - Nov 25, 1958". www.ourcampaigns.com. Retrieved June 12, 2020.
  4. ^ "Our Campaigns - CT US Senate Race - Nov 04, 1958". www.ourcampaigns.com.
  5. ^ Egerton, John (November 29, 1981). "COURTLY CHAMPION OF AMERICA'S ELDERLY". The New York Times. Retrieved August 15, 2019.
  6. ^ "Our Campaigns - FL US Senate - D Primary Race - Sep 09, 1958". www.ourcampaigns.com. Retrieved June 11, 2020.
  7. ^ "Our Campaigns - FL US Senate Race - Nov 04, 1958". www.ourcampaigns.com. Retrieved June 11, 2020.
  8. ^ a b Gugin, Linda C.; St. Clair, James E, eds. (2006). The Governors of Indiana. Indianapolis, Indiana: Indiana Historical Society Press. p. 333. ISBN 0-87195-196-7.
  9. ^ "Our Campaigns - MN US Senate - D Primary Race - Sep 09, 1958". www.ourcampaigns.com.
  10. ^ https://www.leg.state.mn.us/archive/sessions/electionresults/1958-09-09-p-man.pdf
  11. ^ "Our Campaigns - MN US Senate Race - Nov 03, 1964". www.ourcampaigns.com.
  12. ^ "MO US Senate – D Primary". OurCampaigns. Retrieved August 15, 2019.
  13. ^ "MO US Senate – R Primary". OurCampaigns. Retrieved August 15, 2019.
  14. ^ "MO US Senate Race". OurCampaigns. Retrieved August 12, 2019.
  15. ^ a b "Report of the Official Canvass of the Vote Cast at the Primary Election Held in the State of Montana, June 3, 1958" (PDF). Montana Secretary of State. Archived from the original (PDF) on December 28, 2013. Retrieved July 2, 2014.
  16. ^ a b c d e "Statistics of the Presidential and Congressional Election of November 4, 1958" (PDF). Clerk of the United States House of Representatives. Retrieved July 4, 2014.
  17. ^ a b c d Driggs, Don W. (March 1959). "The 1958 Election in Nevada". The Western Political Quarterly. 12 (1): 317–321. doi:10.2307/444059. JSTOR 444059.
  18. ^ "NV US Senate - D Primary". OurCampaigns. Retrieved August 12, 2019.
  19. ^ "NJ US Senate - D Primary". OurCampaigns. Retrieved August 12, 2019.
  20. ^ "NJ US Senate - R Primary". OurCampaigns. Retrieved August 12, 2019.
  21. ^ "NJ US Senate Race". OurCampaigns. Retrieved August 12, 2019.
  22. ^ "NY US Senate - D Convention". Our Campaigns. Retrieved March 12, 2020.
  23. ^ "Our Campaigns - NC US Senate - Special Election Race - Nov 04, 1958". www.ourcampaigns.com. Retrieved June 12, 2020.
  24. ^ "OH US Senate". OurCampaigns. Retrieved August 12, 2019.
  25. ^ Lambert, Bruce (November 1, 1991). "Bayard Ewing, 75, Ex-U.S. Chairman Of the United Way". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved June 12, 2020.
  26. ^ a b "Primary Election Results" (PDF). Office of the Vermont Secretary of State. Retrieved June 16, 2015.
  27. ^ "General Election Results - U.S. senator - 1914-2014" (PDF). Office of the Vermont Secretary of State. Retrieved June 16, 2015.
  28. ^ "WV US Senate". Retrieved January 12, 2019.
  29. ^ "1958 General Election" (PDF). Historical Election Results and Turnout. Secretary of State of West Virginia. Retrieved June 13, 2020.