United States elections, 1922

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Partisan control of Congress and the presidency
Previous party
Incoming party
President Republican Republican
House Republican Republican
Senate Republican Republican

The 1922 United States midterm elections were held on November 7, 1922. The election took place in the middle of President Warren G. Harding's lone term in office. The Republican Party lost seats in both chambers of Congress, but retained their majority in the House and Senate. In the House, the Republicans lost seventy-seven seats to the Democratic Party. The Republicans also lost seven seats in the U.S. Senate, six to the Democrats and one to the Minnesota Farmer–Labor Party.[1]

The election is notable in that no redistricting occurred despite the completion of the 1920 United States Census, as Congress failed to pass a redistricting bill. This was the first and only election in which there was no redistricting after a census. The Apportionment Act of 1911 remained in effect until the Reapportionment Act of 1929.

The election was a victory for Harding's progressive opponents in the Republican Party, and helped lead to the Teapot Dome investigations and Robert La Follette's 1924 third party candidacy.[2]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 7, 1922" (PDF). U.S. House of Reps, Office of the Clerk. Retrieved 29 December 2011. 
  2. ^ Busch, Andrew (1999). Horses in Midstream. University of Pittsburgh Press. pp. 156–157.