United States elections, 2018

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2018 United States elections
Mid-term elections
Election day November 6
Senate elections
Seats contested 33 seats of Class I
Color coded map of 2018 Senate races
Map of the 2018 Senate races
  Dem. incumbent running
  Dem. incumbent retiring
  Rep. incumbent running
  Rep. incumbent retiring
  Ind. incumbent running
  No election
House elections
Seats contested All 435 seats to the U.S. House in the 116th Congress
Gubernatorial elections
Seats contested 39 (36 states, 3 territories)
United States gubernatorial elections, 2018.svg
Map of the 2018 gubernatorial races
  Democratic incumbent eligible for re-election
  Term-limited or retiring Democrat
  Republican incumbent eligible for re-election
  Term-limited or retiring Republican
  Independent incumbent eligible for re-election
  No election

The 2018 United States elections will mostly be held on Tuesday, November 6, 2018. These midterm elections will take place in the middle of Republican President Donald Trump's term. All 435 seats in the United States House of Representatives and 34 of the 100 seats in the United States Senate will be contested. 39 state and territorial governorships and numerous other state and local elections will also be contested.

Federal elections[edit]

The primary season runs from March to September 2018.

Congressional elections[edit]

Senate[edit]

All 33 seats in Senate Class I will be up for election. 23 of the seats to be contested are presently held by Democrats, and eight by Republicans (three of which are retiring), with two being independents.

Additionally, special elections may be held to fill vacancies in the other two Senate Classes.

House of Representatives[edit]

All 435 voting seats in the United States House of Representatives will be up for election. Additionally, elections will be held to select the Delegate for the District of Columbia as well as the delegates from U.S. territories, with the exception of the Resident Commissioner of Puerto Rico, who serves a four-year term.

During or prior to the 2018 House election on November 6, there will be at least four special elections:

In November 2017, the rate of Republican congresspeople announcing their impending retirements or resigning their seats was vastly higher than at similar time-points in the Congresses since 2006.[1] Most of these congresspeople faced tough reelection bids in 2018.[1] The rate of Democratic announcements of pending retirements was in line with previous Congresses.[1] The disproportionate number of Republican impending retirements is likely to harm Republican prospects in the 2018 mid-term elections as there will be fewer districts where Republicans have the incumbency advantage.[2][3]

State elections[edit]

The 2018 state elections will impact the redistricting that will follow the 2020 United States Census, as many states task governors and state legislators with drawing new boundaries for state legislative and Congressional districts.

Gubernatorial elections[edit]

Elections will be held for the governorships of 36 U.S. states and three U.S. territories. Special elections may be held for vacancies in the other states and territories, if required by their state/territorial constitutions.

Legislative elections[edit]

87 of the 99 state legislative chambers are holding regularly-scheduled elections in 2018. Louisiana, Mississippi, New Jersey, and Virginia do not hold regularly-scheduled legislative elections in even years. Kansas, Minnesota, New Mexico, and South Carolina will only hold elections for the lower house. In legislative chambers that use staggered terms, only a portion of the seats in the chamber will be up for election.

Local elections[edit]

Mayoral elections[edit]

Major cities which are holding mayoral elections in 2018 include:

Table of state, territorial, and federal results[edit]

This table shows the partisan results of Congressional, gubernatorial, and state legislative races held in each state and territory in 2018. Note that not all states and territories hold gubernatorial, state legislative, and United States Senate elections in 2018; additionally, the territories and Washington, D.C. do not elect members of the United States Senate. Washington, D.C. and the five inhabited territories each elect one non-voting member of the United States House of Representatives. Nebraska's unicameral legislature and the governorship and legislature of American Samoa are officially non-partisan. In the table, offices/legislatures that are not up for election in 2018 are already filled in for the "after 2018 elections" section, although vacancies or party switching could potentially lead to a flip in partisan control.

Subdivision and PVI Before 2018 elections[4] After 2018 elections
Subdivision PVI[5] Governor State leg. U.S. Senate U.S. House Governor State leg. U.S. Senate U.S. House
Alabama R+14 Rep Rep Split Rep 6–1 Split
Alaska R+9 Ind Rep Rep Rep 1–0 Rep
Arizona R+5 Rep Rep Rep Rep 5–4
Arkansas R+15 Rep Rep Rep Rep 4–0 Rep
California D+12 Dem Dem Dem Dem 39–14
Colorado D+1 Dem Split Split Rep 4–3 Split
Connecticut D+6 Dem Split Dem Dem 5–0
Delaware D+6 Dem Dem Dem Dem 1–0 Dem
Florida R+2 Rep Rep Split Rep 16–11
Georgia R+5 Rep Rep Rep Rep 10–4 Rep
Hawaii D+18 Dem Dem Dem Dem 2–0
Idaho R+19 Rep Rep Rep Rep 2–0 Rep
Illinois D+7 Rep Dem Dem Dem 11–7 Dem
Indiana R+9 Rep Rep Split Rep 7–2 Rep
Iowa R+3 Rep Rep Rep Rep 3–1 Rep
Kansas R+13 Rep Rep Rep Rep 4–0 Rep
Kentucky R+15 Rep Rep Rep Rep 5–1 Rep Rep
Louisiana R+11 Dem Rep Rep Rep 5–1 Dem Rep Rep
Maine D+3 Rep Split Split R/I[a] Split 1–1
Maryland D+12 Rep Dem Dem Dem 7–1
Massachusetts D+12 Rep Dem Dem Dem 9–0
Michigan D+1 Rep Rep Dem Rep 9–5
Minnesota D+1 Dem Rep Dem Dem 5–3
Mississippi R+9 Rep Rep Rep Rep 3–1 Rep Rep
Missouri R+9 Rep Rep Split Rep 6–2 Rep
Montana R+11 Dem Rep Split Rep 1–0 Dem
Nebraska R+14 Rep NP Rep Rep 3–0 NP
Nevada D+1 Rep Dem Split Dem 3–1
New Hampshire Even Rep Rep Dem Dem 2–0 Dem
New Jersey D+7 Dem Dem Dem Dem 7–5 Dem Dem
New Mexico D+3 Rep Dem Dem Dem 2–1
New York D+11 Dem Split Dem Dem 18–9
North Carolina R+3 Dem Rep Rep Rep 10–3 Dem Rep
North Dakota R+17 Rep Rep Split Rep 1–0 Rep
Ohio R+3 Rep Rep Split Rep 12–4
Oklahoma R+20 Rep Rep Rep Rep 5–0 Rep
Oregon D+5 Dem Dem Dem Dem 4–1 Dem
Pennsylvania Even Dem Rep Split Rep 13–5
Rhode Island D+10 Dem Dem Dem Dem 2–0
South Carolina R+8 Rep Rep Rep Rep 6–1 Rep
South Dakota R+14 Rep Rep Rep Rep 1–0 Rep
Tennessee R+14 Rep Rep Rep Rep 7–2
Texas R+8 Rep Rep Rep Rep 25–11
Utah R+20 Rep Rep Rep Rep 4–0 Rep
Vermont D+15 Rep Dem Split D/I[b] Dem 1–0
Virginia D+1 Dem Rep Dem Rep 7–4 Dem Rep
Washington D+7 Dem Dem Dem Dem 6–4 Dem
West Virginia R+20 Rep Rep Split Rep 3–0 Rep
Wisconsin Even Rep Rep Split Rep 5–3
Wyoming R+25 Rep Rep Rep Rep 1–0
United States Even Rep Rep Rep Rep
Washington, D.C. D+43 Dem[c] Dem[c] N/A Dem N/A
American Samoa N/A NP NP Rep NP NP
Guam Rep Dem Dem
N. Mariana Islands Rep Split Ind
Puerto Rico PNP Split PNP/R PNP PNP/R
U.S. Virgin Islands Ind Dem Dem
Subdivision PVI Governor State leg. U.S. Senate U.S. House Governor State leg. U.S. Senate U.S. House
Subdivision and PVI Before 2018 elections After 2018 elections

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ One of Maine's Senators is a Republican, the other (Angus King) is an independent who has caucused with the Democrats since taking office in 2013.
  2. ^ One of Vermont's Senators is a Democrat, the other (Bernie Sanders) was elected as an independent but has caucused with the Democrats since taking office in 2007.
  3. ^ a b Washington, D.C. does not elect a governor or state legislature, but it does elect a mayor and a city council.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c CNN, Sam Petulla and Jennifer Hansler,. "There is a wave of Republicans leaving Congress". CNN. Retrieved 2017-11-10. 
  2. ^ Rakich, Nathaniel (2017-09-12). "The Recent Rush Of GOP Retirements Is Good For Democrats". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved 2017-11-10. 
  3. ^ Cohn, Nate (2017-09-29). "Why Retirements May Hold the Key in Whether Republicans Can Keep the House". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2017-11-10. 
  4. ^ "2017 State & Legislative Partisan Composition" (PDF). National Conference of State Legislatures. Retrieved January 11, 2018. 
  5. ^ Coleman, Miles. "2016 State PVI Changes". Decision Desk HQ. Retrieved 9 November 2017.