United States military beret flash

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Wear of beret flashes in the US military
US Army Special Forces NCOs wearing rifle–green berets with various organizational beret flashes from different special forces groups under the 1st Special Forces Command, how's DUI is affixed to each flash
A US Army officer wearing tan beret with the 75th Ranger Regiment Beret Flash bearing lieutenant colonel rank insignia
A US Air Force officer wearing black beret with TACP Beret Flash and Crest along with miniature captain rank insignia
A US Air Force NCO and officer wearing brown berets and Combat Aviation Advisor Beret Flash with the officer affixing his rank insignia (major) to its center
A US Air Force officer and US Army NCO wearing maroon berets with JCSE Beret Flash, the officer affixing his colonel rank insignia and the NCO her JCSE DUI
A Canadian Army officer and a US Army NCO wearing orange berets with Multinational Force and Observers Beret Flash, one metal (left) and one embroidered (right)

In the United States (US) Department of Defense, a beret flash is a shield-shaped embroidered cloth that is 2.25 in (5.72 cm) tall and 1.875 in (4.76 cm) wide with a semi–circular base that is attached to a stiffener backing of a military beret.[1][2][3][4] These flashes—a British word for colorful embroidered patches worn on military berets—are worn over the left eye with the excess cloth of the beret shaped, folded, and pulled over the right ear giving it a distinctive appearance.[1][2][3] The embroidered designs of the Army's beret flashes represent the heraldic colors and patterns of a unit with a unique mission or represent the Army overall.[5] The Air Force's beret flashes represent their Air Force Specialty Code (AFSC) or their assignment to a unit with a unique mission.[2] Joint beret flashes—such as those worn by the Joint Communications Support Element (JCSE) and the Multinational Force and Observers—are worn by all who are assigned to the joint unit, given their uniform regulations allow.[6][7]

With the exception of some joint beret flashes, Army soldiers and Non–Commissioned Officers (NCOs) affix their Distinctive Unit Insignia (DUI) to the center of their beret flash unless assigned to a unit not authorized a DUI, then their regimental distinctive insignia is worn.[1] Army warrant officers and commissioned officers affix their polished metal rank insignia to their beret flash while chaplains affix their polished metal branch insignia.[1] Air Force commissioned officers in the security forces or assigned to a combat aviation advisor squadron wear their beret flash in the same manner as the Army while Tactical Air Control Party (TACP) officers attach a miniature version of their polished metal rank insignia below the TACP Crest on the TACP Beret Flash.[2][8] Air Force airman and NCOs only wear their beret flash or beret flash with crest.[2][8]

The design of all Department of Defense beret flashes are created and/or approved by The Institute of Heraldry, Department of the Army.[9] For formations authorized a beret flash but have not yet been awarded one, the institute will conduct research into the requesting unit's heraldry, as well as design suggestions from the unit, in the creation of a new unit–specific beret flash.[10][11] Leveraging geometrical divisions, shapes, and colors, a heraldic artist will create a design that will represent the history and mission of the requesting unit.[10][11] Once the unit agrees upon a design, the institute will create manufacturing instructions and monitor their creation by companies authorized to produce the beret flash.[11][12][13]

US Department of Defense beret flash history[edit]

US Army[edit]

509th Parachute Infantry Regiment Pocket–Patch and Beret Flash, c. World War II[3]

Throughout its history, Army units have adopted different headgear and headgear devices—such as various color accoutrements and insignias—to identify specific units, the unique mission of a unit, and/or the unique roles of soldiers.[4][14][15] According to some historians, the first US military use of a beret flash was created and worn by the 509th Parachute Infantry Regiment.[3][16][17] The 509th trained with the British 1st Airborne Division during World War II and was made honorary members of the British airborne forces in 1943, entitling them to wear the maroon beret worn by British paratroopers.[17][18] Some 509th paratroopers had a small hand–embroidered version of their regiment's gold and black pocket–patch created for use as their beret flash on their honorary maroon berets.[3][16][17][19] The design of the 509th's pocket–patch depicts a stylized figure of a paratrooper standing at the exit–door of an aircraft wearing a reserve parachute with an artistic rendering of the number "509" surrounding the paratrooper's head and the word "GERONIMO" displayed at the base of the door.[3][16][17][19]

11th Special Forces Group Beret Flash—note design similarities with the unit's recognition bar
11th Special Forces Group Recognition Bar
A medical corps paratrooper with the 11th Special Forces Group wearing rifle-green beret with 1st Special Forces DUI above his unit's recognition bar, c. 1967[20]

The official start of the Army's beret flashes began in 1961 with Department of the Army Message 578636 authorizing the establishment of organizational beret flashes for wear on the special forces' rifle–green beret.[3][21] In this message, the beret flash is described as shield–shaped with a semi–circular base made of felt 2 in (51 mm) tall and 1.625 in (41 mm) wide using solid colors to represent each of the special forces groups of the era.[3][21] The message also described who was authorized to wear the organizational beret flash stating that only special operations qualified paratroopers would be permitted to wear their special forces unit's organizational beret flash.[21] Each of these special forces group beret flashes were to be worn centered over the left eye with either the 1st Special Forces—later designated 1st Special Forces CommandDUI, polished metal officer rank insignia, or chaplain branch insignia centered on the flash.[4][21] Non–qualified paratroopers assigned to a special forces unit were to wear their Parachutist Badge with officers affixing their polished metal rank insignia or chaplain branch insignia below it on the rifle–green beret.[21] Later, non–qualified soldiers assigned to a special forces unit wore a cloth recognition bar, 1.875 in (4.76 cm) long and 0.5 in (1.27 cm) wide color and pattern matched to their group's organizational beret flash below the 1st Special Force DUI, polished metal officer rank insignia, or chaplain branch insignia on the rifle–green beret.[4][22][23]

1st Battalion, 508th Infantry Regiment cloth insignias
Background trimming
Beret flash
Note the design similarities between the background trimming and beret flash
A color guard from the 82nd Airborne Division's 3rd Brigade, 1st Battalion, 508th Infantry stand in review wearing maroon berets with their new Battalion specific organizational beret flash with there regiment's DUI affixed, 1975[24]

Other beret accouterments began to appear in the 1960s and 70s, particularly between 1973 and 1979 when the Department of the Army had its morale–enhancing order in effect and various colored berets began to be worn by numerous units and branches of the Army.[25][26][27][28] Historical photographs from the 1960s through the 1970s show soldiers assigned to Long–Range Reconnaissance and Patrol units wearing black berets with a wide variety of custom–made beret flashes that were worn over the left eye (see Example 1).[28] In 1973, Army leaders authorized the wear of the maroon beret by airborne units.[25][28] Within a year or so, paratroopers of the 82nd Airborne Division began incorporating organizational beret flashes onto their maroon berets pattered after their unit's background trimming—which made their debut in World War II[29]—behind their DUI, polished metal officer rank insignia, or chaplain branch insignia and worn centered over the left eye.[1][24][30] Similarly, in 1974 Army leaders authorized the 101st Airborne Division at Fort Campbell to wear the dark–blue beret when it was reorganized into an air assault unit.[14][26][28][31][32][33] Army articles and historical photographs of 101st soldiers show them wearing traditional organizational beret flashes patterned after their unit's background trimming—just like the 82nd Airborne's—but with enlisted affixing their DUI and NCOs and officers affixing their polished metal rank insignia.[14][28][31][33] Between 1976 and 1977, 101st soldiers would add their Airmobile Badge—renamed Air Assault Badge in 1978—to their berets and wore them to the left of their beret flash (see Example 2).[14][28][33][34] Some other Fort Campbell units of the era also wore the dark–blue beret as well as red for headquarters command and kelly–green for military police, all with traditional organizational beret flashes placed centered over the left eye.[26][28] In 1975, the Army authorized its ranger units to wear the black beret and if earned these rangers affix their Ranger Tab to the top edge of their organizational beret flash and wore it over their left eye (see Example 3).[28][35] Also during the 1970s, arctic–qualified soldiers of the 172nd Infantry Brigade began to wear locally authorized olive–drab berets with traditionally styled organizational beret flashes that were unique to each battalion, and were worn in the same manner as beret flashes are today (see Example 4).[1][27][28][36] Additionally, versions armor and cavalry units began wearing black berets with some adopting organizational beret flashes of various shapes and colors and wore them differently than other Army units of the era.[26][27][28] For example, armored cavalry regiments stationed in West Germany began wearing black berets in the 1970s with a maroon and white oval as their beret flash.[26][27][28] These armored cavalry soldiers wore the oval vertically behind their DUI to the left of their metal rank insignia and positioned over their left temple (see Example 5).[26][27][28][37] During this same time period, the 1st Cavalry Division was converted into a Triple Capability (TRICAP) division and began wearing different color berets representing the unique capability of each formation: black for armor, light–blue for infantry, red for artillery, and kelly–green for support.[38] Affixed to each TRICAP beret was a battalion or squadron specific organizational beret flash; some were similar in design to what you see worn today while others were unique in their shape.[3][28] Some historical photographs show soldiers in these TRICAP formations wearing their unit's beret in the same manner as the Army's armored cavalry regiments of the era (see Example 6).[28][37] By 1979, the Army put a stop to the use of berets by conventional forces, leaving only special forces and ranger units the authority to wear berets.[26][27][28]

Example 1
2nd Battalion, 8th Cavalry, Reconnaissance Platoon Flash
An infantryman with the 1st Cavalry Division, 2nd Battalion, 8th Cavalry, Reconnaissance Platoon wearing black beret with platoon beret flash, 1970[28]
Example 2
326th Engineer Battalion Background Trimming—note the similarities with the 326th's beret flash
326th Engineer Battalion Flash
An engineer officer with the 101st Airborne Division wearing dark–blue beret with 326th Engineer Battalion Beret Flash, lieutenant colonel rank insignia, and Airmobile Badge affixed, 1977[28][33]
Example 3
Ranger Training Brigade Flash
An infantry NCO with the US Army Infantry School wearing black beret with Ranger Training Brigade Beret Flash and 75th Ranger Regiment DUI below his Ranger Tab, c. 1975[39]
Example 4
1st Battalion, 60th Infantry Flash
An infantryman with the 172nd Infantry Brigade wearing olive–drab beret with 1st Battalion, 60th Infantry Beret Flash and DUI, c. 1970s[28][36]
Example 5
Armored Cavalry Oval
An artillery NCO with the 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment wearing black beret with sergeant rank insignia next to Armored Cavalry Oval and DUI, c. 1970s[28]
Example 6
1st Battalion, 12th Cavalry Flash
An infantryman with the 1st Cavalry Division (TRICAP) wearing black beret with specialist rank insignia next to 1st Battalion (mechanized infantry), 12th Cavalry Beret Flash and DUI, 1976[40]

In 1980, the Army reversed part of its decision allowing airborne units to wear maroon berets, ranger units black berets—which switched to tan berets in 2001[27]—and special forces units rifle–green berets.[26][27][41] The Army's 1981 uniform regulation describes the wear of these newly approved berets with the only authorized accoutrements being officer rank insignias, chaplain branch insignias, DUIs, organizational beret flashes, and recognition bars.[4][42] The organizational beret flash did not become the norm until 1984 when the recognition bar was discontinued after the Special Forces Tab became authorized for wear by special forces qualified paratroopers.[22] At which time, all soldiers assigned to a special forces unit, regardless of qualification, wore their unit's organizational beret flash on either the rifle–green beret—for special forces qualified paratroopers—or maroon beret—for support paratroopers.[1]

In 2000, General Eric Shinseki, Chief of Staff of the Army, decided to make the black beret the standard headgear of the Army.[1][9][27] General Shinseki also decided that a new Department of the Army Beret Flash be worn on the black beret.[9][27][43] This Army flash is designed to resemble the flag of the Commander–in–Chief of the Continental Army at the time of its victory at Yorktown in 1781 and is worn in the same manner as all beret flashes in the modern Army (see Example 1).[1][27][44] According to Department of the Army Pamphlet 670–1, the Department of the Army Beret Flash is to be worn by all units "unless authorization for another flash was granted before implementing the black beret as a standard Army headgear".[1] Army units can request an organizational beret flash for their formation from The Institute of Heraldry given it is not for wear on the black beret; an example of this is the 2018 authorization of organizational beret flashes for the Security Force Assistance Command and its brigades—known as SFABs ["S Fabs"]—for wear on their brown berets (see Example 2).[1][10][45][46][47][48][49][50][51][52] In the 21st century, Army organizational beret flashes are worn to signify a specific formation of a specialized unit, such as an active airborne, ranger, special forces, or combat advisor unit.[1][5][15][25] Additionally, there is a unique beret flash worn by special forces soldiers on their rifle–green beret when assigned to a unit not authorized an organizational beret flash (see Example 3).[1]

Example 1
Department of the Army Beret Flash
A soldier from the 2nd Infantry Division's 1st Brigade wearing black beret with Department of the Army Beret Flash and 23rd Infantry Regiment DUI affixed at Army beret downing ceremony, c. 2001[53][54]
Example 2
1st SFAB Beret Flash
A soldier from the 1st SFAB wearing brown beret with unit beret flash and DUI affixed, 2018[55]—note that this is the first organizational beret flash authorized for a non–airborne unit in the modern Army[10][47]
Example 3
Beret flash for special forces personal assigned to non–special forces units
A special forces qualified officer wearing rifle–green beret with beret flash for special forces personnel not assigned to special forces units with general rank insignia affixed, 2019[56]

US Air Force[edit]

Commando Weatherman Beret Flash, c. 1960s[57]
The 5th Weather Squadron Emblem (L) and Beret Flash (R)—note the alchemical symbol for water with representative colors green (Earth), blue (air), and red (fire)[57]

In the mid 1960s, Air Force commando weathermen,[58] formally known as weather parachutists, with Detachment 26 of the 30th Weather Squadron and Detachment 32 of the 5th Weather Squadron informally wore black berets.[57] The beret flash worn on these berets was a black cloth rectangle with a depiction of a yellow embroidered anemometer surmounted by a fleur–de–lis with the words “Combat Weather” split by the anemometer.[57] From 1970 through the 1980s, weather parachutists with the 5th Weather Squadron wore maroon berets with an Army style beret flash that incorporated the squadron's design and colors from their emblem's alchemical symbol for water and wore their Parachutist Badge affixed to the flash.[10][57] In 1979, weather parachutists, now called Special Operations Weather Teams (SOWTs), were authorized to wear navy–blue berets with an Army style beret flash consisting of a blue and black field surrounded by yellow piping.[10][57] Enlisted and NCOs wore their Parachutist Badge affixed to the flash while officers wore their polished metal rank insignia.[57] In 1986, the gray beret was authorized for wear by all SOWTs who continued to wear the aforementioned cloth beret flash until a new large color metallic SOWT Crest was authorized.[57] In 1992, the Air Force approved the return of the SOWT's blue, black, and yellow beret flash from the 70s and affixed their large color metallic SOWT Crest to it.[57] In 1996, the SOWTs assigned to Air Force Special Operations Command (AFSOC) wore a new Army style beret flash while those assigned to Air Combat Command, known as Combat Weather Teams (CWTs), continued to wear the blue, black and yellow beret flash.[10][57][59] The AFSOC SOWT Beret Flash consisted of a red border representing the blood shed by their predecessors, a black background representing special operations, and three diagonal lines of various colors representing the services they supported (green=Army, purple=joint forces, and blue=Air Force).[57] Enlisted and NCOs wore their Parachutist Badge on top of the AFSOC SOWT Beret Flash while officers wore their polished metal rank insignia until 2002 when the Combat Weather Team Crest was created.[57] The Combat Weather Team Crest was worn affixed on both SOWT and CWT beret flashes by enlisted and NCOs while officers continued to affix their polished metal rank insignia.[57][60][61] In 2007/2008, the AFSOC SOWT Beret Flash stopped being worn and in 2009—when the Special Operations Weather AFSC was established—a new large polished metallic Special Operations Weather Crest was approved for wear by all SOWTs and CWTs (enlisted, NCOs, and officers alike) on their gray berets.[2][57][60][62][63]

CWT Beret Flash
A weather parachutist NCO with the 82nd Airborne Division wearing gray beret with CWT Beret Flash and Combat Weather Team Crest, 2007[64]
SOWT Beret Flash
A weather parachutist with the 107th Weather Flight wearing gray beret with SOWT Beret Flash and Combat Weather Team Crest, 2008[60]

In 1966/67, the newly formed 1041st Security Police Squadron was authorized to wear a dark–blue beret with a unique organizational beret flash.[65][66][67] The 1041st's beret flash had a depiction of a falcon carrying a pair of lightning bolts on a somewhat pointed oval-shaped light-blue patch that was worn over the left temple.[65][66][67] In 1976, the Air Force approved the navy-blue beret, worn by Strategic Air Command's Elite Guard and Air Force Combat Control Teams, as the official uniform item for all Air Force police and security forces.[65][68] In 1997, the Air Force stood up the security forces AFSC and honored the heraldry of the 1041st Security Police Squadron by creating a new organizational beret flash for all security forces airman and NCOs that depict the 1041st's falcon over an airfield with the motto "Defensor Fortis" (defenders of the force) embroidered on a scroll at its base.[2][65] Security forces officers wear the same basic beret flash minus the embroidered falcon and airfield and in its place affix their polished metal rank insignia.[2]

1041st Security Police Squadron Beret Flash
A security policeman with the 1041st Security Police Squadron wearing their distinctive dark–blue beret and beret flash, c. 1968[66]
Security Forces Beret Flash
A security forces airman with the 55th Security Forces Squadron wearing navy–blue beret with Security Forces Beret Flash, 1998[69]

In 1979, TACP airman and NCOs were given authorization to wear the black beret. In 1984, two TACP's submitted a design for a unique beret flash and crest for wear on their berets which the Air Force approved one year later.[26] The TACP Beret Flash—which followed the basic design language of Army beret flashes[10]—incorporates red borders that represent the firepower TACP's bring to bear with two dovetailed fields of blue and green represent the close working relationship between the Air Force and the Army that is enabled by the TACP.[70] Later, air liaison officers were given authorization to wear the black beret and the TACP Beret Flash.[26][71][72] In 2019 the Air Force uniform instruction changed directing air liaison officers, now called TACP Officers, to wear the TACP Beret Flash and Crest with miniature polished metal rank insignia below the crest and just above the inner–border of the beret flash.[2][73][74] Similarly, Air Mobility Liaison Officers (AMLOs) also wore the black beret.[26] Although worn informally before then, in 2015 The Institute of Heraldry authorized a slight modification of the TACP Beret Flash for wear by AMLOs, incorporating an embroidered compass rose in the upper–left corner of the beret flash, and was worn in the same manner as Army beret flashes.[1][2][75][76] Despite this, the Air Force Uniform Board and uniform regulations do not address the wear of the AMLO Beret Flash by these liaison officers.[2]

TACP Beret Flash
An air liaison officer with the 682nd Air Support Operations Squadron wearing black beret with TACP Beret Flash and rank insignia (captain), 2011[77]
The Institute of Heraldry manufacturing instructions for the AMLO Beret Flash, 2015[76]
An AMLO with the 8th Air Support Operations Squadron wearing black beret with AMLO Beret Flash and rank insignia (captain)—note the compass rose at the upper-left corner—2011[75]
A SERE NCO with a combat aviation advisor squadron wearing brown beret with Combat Aviation Advisor Beret Flash and SERE Specialist Crest, 2018[78]
Combat Aviation Advisor Beret Flash

In 2018, AFSOC authorized the wear of the brown beret for airman, NCOs, and officers assigned to a combat aviation advisor squadron, specifically the 6th and 711th Special Operations Squadrons. The brown beret—similar to the Army's brown beret—is worn with an Army style organizational beret flash consisting of a dark–blue field with olive–green diagonal stripes and border.[10][79] The Combat Aviation Advisor Beret Flash is worn centered over the left eye with polished metal officer rank insignia, chaplain branch insignia, or an AFSC metallic beret crest—such as the Survival, Evasion, Resistance and Escape (SERE) Specialist Crest—affixed to the beret flash while all other advisors wear the cloth Combat Aviation Advisor Beret Flash without accoutrements.[78][79]

US Navy[edit]

In the 1960s, select Navy riverine patrol units operating in South Vietnam adopted the black beret to be part of their daily uniform and wore various accouterments on their berets.[80][81] In 1967, the Commander of the Riverine Patrol Force sent an official message to the Commander of River Patrol Flotilla Five authorizing the wear of the black beret.[81] In this message, the wear and appearance of the beret was defined stating, "Beret will be worn with river patrol force insignia centered on right side" and "Only standard size river patrol force insignia will be worn on beret. ... No other emblem or rank insignia will be displayed on beret"[81][82] Today, these Navy small boat units honor their heritage by wearing the black beret during special occasions—such as induction ceremonies into the Gamewardens Association[83]—and will affix historically relevant riverine task force insignia for use as their beret flash.[84][85][86][87]

River Patrol Force, Task Force 116 Insignia
Chief of Naval Operations (L) and Commander, Riverine Patrol Force (R) wearing black berets with Task Force 116 Insignia, 1969[88]
A Navy NCO from Riverine Squadron 1 receives the historical black beret with Task Force 116 Insignia at a ceremony making him an honorary "Gamewarden," 2011[85]

Beret flashes of the US military[edit]

Joint[edit]

Air Force[edit]

Obsolete

Army[edit]

Adjutant general[edit]

Obsolete

Air defense artillery[edit]

Obsolete

Armor and cavalry[edit]

Obsolete

Aviation[edit]

Obsolete

Chemical[edit]

Obsolete

Civil affairs[edit]

Obsolete

Engineer[edit]

Obsolete

Field artillery[edit]

Obsolete

Infantry[edit]

Obsolete

Logistics[edit]

Obsolete

Medical[edit]

Obsolete

Military intelligence[edit]

Obsolete

Military police[edit]

Obsolete

Multidisciplinary units[edit]

Obsolete

Ordnance[edit]

Psychological operations[edit]

Obsolete

Public affairs[edit]

Signal[edit]

Obsolete

Special forces[edit]

Obsolete

Training[edit]

Obsolete

Beret flashes of US defense forces[edit]

Collectively referred to as state defense forces—also known as state guard, state military reserve, or militia—in many US states and territories wear modified versions of US Army uniforms.[9][92][93] To help separate these state guard members from other federal armed forces, such as the US National Guard, they will wear a unique organizational beret flash on their military beret that is worn in the same manner as their federal counterparts.[9][94][95][96][97][98][99][100] The following is a list of some of these organizational beret flashes worn by various US militia units:

State, territory, and district specific militia[edit]

Obsolete

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p Department of the Army Pamphlet 670–1, Uniform and Insignia Guide to the Wear and Appearance of Army Uniforms and Insignia, Department of the Army, dated 26 January 2021, last accessed 21 June 2021 Public Domain This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m Air Force Instruction 36-2903, Dress and Personal Appearance of Air Force Personnel, US Department of the Air Force, dated 7 February 2020, corrected 2 July 2020, last accessed 14 November 2020
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Beret Insignia of the U.S. Army, by William A Hudspeath, dated 1987, ASIN B06XD7DSY9, last reviewed 1 September 2021
  4. ^ a b c d e AR 670–1 1981 (OBSOLETE):Wear and appearance of Army uniforms and insignia, Department of the Army via Ike Skelton Combined Arms Research Library Digital Library, dated 1 November 1981, last accessed 21 November 2020
  5. ^ a b c d US Army / US Army Heraldry / Beret Flash and Background Trimmings, The Institute of Heraldry, last accessed 12 February 2020
  6. ^ a b Joint Communications Support Element–Government Organization, official Facebook page, last accessed 20 January 2021
  7. ^ a b War Eagle Troopers receive Multinational Force and Observers medal, Army.mil, by MAJ Michael Soyka and SGT William A. Tanner, dated 9 May 2016, last accessed 28 April 2018
  8. ^ a b Quiet Professionals don brown beret, US Air Force Special Operations Command, by Capt Monique Roux, dated 8 January 2018, last accessed 28 April 2018
  9. ^ a b c d e Army Regulation 670–1 (2021), Uniform and Insignia Wear and Appearance of Army Uniforms and Insignia, Department of the Army, dated 26 January 2021, last accessed 11 April 2021
  10. ^ a b c d e f g h i FAQs-Organizational Insignia, Department of the Army, The Institute of Heraldry, last accessed 20 November 2021
  11. ^ a b c Big Picture: Your Army Reports: Number 10, US Army's The Big Picture (TV 713), hosted on PublicResourceOrg YouTube Channel, dated 1967, posted 31 December 2010, last accessed 19 May 2020
  12. ^ Beret Flash and Background Trimming for the 346th Quartermaster Company; Department of the Army, The Institute of Heraldry; SAAA-IHS; dated 16 December 2019; last accessed 6 June 2020
  13. ^ TIOH Organization, Department of the Army, The Institute of Heraldry, last accessed 7 December 2021
  14. ^ a b c d All American Legacy Podcast Ep 25 - The French Hat, 82nd Airborne Division Official YouTube Channel, dated 26 June 2017, last accessed 24 March 2020
  15. ^ a b The colorful and controversial history of the Army's berets, ConnectingVets.Radio.com, by Jack Murphy, dated 23 October 2019, last accessed 18 January 2020
  16. ^ a b c Rare WWII 509th Parachute Infantry Battalion Airborne Italian Made Patch Superb, Pricing and History, WorthPoint, last accessed 19 October 2021
  17. ^ a b c d 509th PIB Red Beret, 509th Parachute Infantry Battalion, America's First Combat Paratroopers, History of the 509th PIB in WWII (1941 - 1945), 509th Parachute Infantry Association, dated 2006, last accessed 19 October 2021
  18. ^ Earning it: A complete history of Army berets and who's allowed to wear them, ArmyTimes, by Meghann Myers, dated 19 November 2017, last accessed 19 October 2021
  19. ^ a b 509th Infantry Regiment, Distinctive Unit Insignia, Coat of Arms, Department of the Army, The Institute of Heraldry, dated 28 May 1970, last accessed 4 July 2021
  20. ^ Keith Allen Campbell; Specialist Four; Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 503rd Infantry, 173rd Airborne Brigade, US Army Reserve; Army of the United States, Arlington, Virginia; March 03, 1946 to February 08, 1967; The Virtual Wall, Vietnam Veterans Memorial; last updated 15 August 2019, last accessed 14 November 2020
  21. ^ a b c d e RFK Speech- Authorizations for Green Beret, John F. Kennedy Special Warfare Museum, soc.mil, last accessed 25 April 2021
  22. ^ a b US Army Special Forces 1952–84, Bloomsbury Publishing, by Gordon L. Rottman, dated 20 September 2012, ISBN 9781782004462, last accessed 29 March 2019
  23. ^ Army Regulation 614–200, Enlisted Assignments and Utilization Management, Department of the Army, dated 25 January 2019, last accessed 30 May 2020
  24. ^ a b Utrikestjänst, CA besök i USA. Fort Bragg, Digitaltmuseum.se, by SP4 Laverne Fultz (US Army), dated 28 May 1975, last accessed 19 December 2020
  25. ^ a b c History of the Army Beret, CSA SENDS - THE ARMY BLACK BERET, armyreal.com, last accessed 12 February 2020
  26. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k The Beret in U.S. Military Uniform History, The Balance Careers, by Rod Powers, updated 27 June 2019, last accessed 14 September 2019
  27. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k A Short History of the Use of Berets in the U.S. Army, army.mil via WebArchive, dated 03 November 2000, last accessed 26 March 2019
  28. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t US Army berets - blue, black, green, maroon, tan..., The US Militaria Forum, last accessed 10 September 2021
  29. ^ Insignia of Airborne Units, U.S. Army, Second World War, Airborne Breast Oval Background Trimmings, American Military Patches, Other Insignia and Decorations of World War Two, by Dr. Howard G. Lanham, dated 2001, last accessed 24 June 2017
  30. ^ A member of Company B, 2nd Brigade, 82nd Airborne Division, prepares for a troop drop during Exercise NEPTUNE II, Defense Audiovisual Agency, National Archives and Records Administration (locator: 6375832 and local identifier: 330-CFD-DF-SN-84-04750.jpeg), dated 20 August 1977, last accessed 19 December 2020
  31. ^ a b c 101st Airborne Division Blue Air Assault Beret 1973-1978, U.S. Militaria Forum, last accessed 25 January 2021
  32. ^ Welcome to the 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault), Army.mil, by 101st Airborne Division Public Affairs Office, dated 2 April 2014, last accessed 25 January 20212
  33. ^ a b c d On episode 25 of the All American Legacy Podcast, we mention the blue beret of the 101st Airborne Division in the 1970s. Well, here is the proof., 82nd Airborne Division official Facebook page, dated 28 June 2017, last accessed 13 January 2022
  34. ^ Qualification Badges, Air Assault Badge, Department of the Army, The Institute of Heraldry, dated 18 January 1978, last accessed 16 October 2020
  35. ^ History of the Black Beret, Army Study Guide, by SMA Jack L. Tilley, last accessed 23 December 2020
  36. ^ a b 1st Battalion 22nd Infantry, Regulars 76-78, 1st Battalion 22nd Infantry 1976-1978, Image caption: (Photo taken when Don was with the 172nd INF BDE in Alaska, before being assigned to 1/22 Infantry. Note the olive drab beret. The 172nd was the only unit in the Army authorized to wear the olive beret.), by Don Krewson, dated 2011, last accessed 8 May 2021
  37. ^ a b The Black Beret, Tanker's Jackets and Gunnery Qualification Patches: Scouts Out ... Fashion Forward, The Hidden Stories: 1970s - From Starch to Permanent Press, Eaglehorse.org, last accessed 6 May 2020
  38. ^ Nick's FARRP #7 – First Cavalry Division – 1978, The Days Forward, dated 14 June 2020, last accessed 5 September 2021
  39. ^ Ranger Hall of Fame, US Army Airborne and Ranger Training Brigade, last Updated 28 November 2018, last accessed 5 September 2021
  40. ^ Fort Hood, TX - 1976 - when I was in the 1st Battalion, 12th Cavalry (Mechanized Infantry) in the First Cavalry Division. A great looking uniform with the black beret - the 1/12 had lots of unit citations too., US Army photograph hosted on Facebook, curtesy of Quentin Robinson, dated 1976, posted 11 November 2015, last accessed 15 January 2022
  41. ^ Army Regulation 670–1 (2002), Uniforms and Insignia, Wear and Appearance of Army Uniforms and Insignia, Department of the Army, dated 1 July 2002, last accessed 22 April 2020
  42. ^ Operation Urgent Fury (Grenada) (US Military photo gallery), PBase.com, by Oly Olson, last accessed 4 July 2018
  43. ^ Beret Flash, U.S. Army, A-4-187 (manufacturing production sheet), Department of the Army, The Institute of Heraldry (courtesy of Eagles of War), dated 22 November 2000, last accessed 11 June 2020—a copy is also available on Wikimedia Commons at File:US Army TIOH Manufacturing Instructions Sheet-Army Flash.png
  44. ^ U.S. Army Beret Flash, Department of the Army, The Institute of Heraldry, dated 20 November 2000, last accessed 1 February 2021
  45. ^ Clothing and Heraldry PSID, US Army TACOM Life Cycle Management Command, last accessed 8 September 2019
  46. ^ Authorized Insignia for the Security Force Assistance Command; Department of the Army, The Institute of Heraldry; AAMH-IHS; dated 16 November 2018; last accessed 14 April 2020
  47. ^ a b Beret Flash for the 1st Security Force Assistance Brigade; Department of the Army, The Institute of Heraldry; AAMH-IHS; dated 9 February 2018; last accessed 14 April 2020
  48. ^ Beret Flash for the 2d Security Force Assistance Brigade; Department of the Army, The Institute of Heraldry; AAMH-IHS; dated 7 June 2018; last accessed 14 April 2020
  49. ^ Beret Flash for the 3d Security Force Assistance Brigade; Department of the Army, The Institute of Heraldry; AAMH-IHS; dated 8 August 2018; last accessed 14 April 2020
  50. ^ Authorized Insignia for the 4th Security Force Assistance Brigade; Department of the Army, The Institute of Heraldry; AAMH-IHS; dated 8 January 2019; last accessed 14 April 2020
  51. ^ Authorized Insignia for the 5th Security Force Assistance Brigade; Department of the Army, The Institute of Heraldry; SAAA-IHS; dated 31 July 2019; last accessed 14 April 2020
  52. ^ Authorized Insignia for the 54th Security Force Assistance Brigade; Department of the Army, The Institute of Heraldry; SAAA-IHS; dated 2 December 2019; last accessed 5 June 2020
  53. ^ Youngest Beret, 1st Battalion, 23rdInfantry Regiment, Fort Lewis's 23rd Infantry Regiment official homepage, last updated 15 July 2002, last accessed 29 December 2020
  54. ^ Defense Leaders Uphold Army's Black Beret Decision (Corrected Copy), American Forces Press Service, by Linda D. Kozaryn, dated 16 March 2001, last accessed 20 November 2021
  55. ^ 1st SFAB hosts activation ceremony; Heraldry announced, Army.mil, by US Army, dated 8 February 2018, last accessed 29 December 2020
  56. ^ US Soldier Killed in Afghanistan Returns Home to USA, VOA News (via YouTube), dated 25 December 2019, last accessed 8 December 2021
  57. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o Air Force Weather, Our Heritage 1937 to 2012, prepared by TSgt C. A. Ravenstein (Historical Division, AW3DI, Hq AWS), dated 22 January 2012, last accessed 14 March 2020
  58. ^ Special Operations Weather Team, AFSOC, dated 12 August 2014, last accessed 14 November 2020
  59. ^ Special Operations Weather Technicians and Officers, National Museum of the United States Air Force, dated 2 June 2015, last accessed 16 March 2020
  60. ^ a b c Earning the gray beret, Keesler Air Force Base public website, dated 10 June 2008, last accessed 18 July 2017
  61. ^ Christian Shepherd, 18th Weather Squadron Combat Weatherman, flickr.com, dated 7 October 2007, last accessed 18 July 2017
  62. ^ STS kicks off Kadena's remembrance ceremony, 353sog.af.mil, by SSgt Christopher Hummel, dated 12 November 2010, last accessed 8 March 2020
  63. ^ 335th TRS student receives Gray Beret, by Andre’ Askew (81st Training Wing Public Affairs), dated 28 March 2017, last accessed 9 August 2021
  64. ^ Air Force Report: Combat Weathermen, Defense Visual Information Distribution Service, by TSgt Ron Rogers (U.S. Air Force), dated 11 October 2007, last accessed 24 June 2020
  65. ^ a b c d History of the Security Police Beret, by Safeside Association, last accessed 5 July 2018
  66. ^ a b c USAF Safeside (Part 1 of 2), US Air Force, hosted of Krpinckney YouTube Channel—video extract available on Commons—posted 12 November 2009, last accessed 7 May 2020
  67. ^ a b USAF Security Police Squadrons in Vietnam, usmilitariaforum.com, posted 22 March 2009, last accessed 14 July 2017
  68. ^ Brothers in Berets, The Evolution of Air Force Special Tactics, 1953-2003; Air University Press, Curtis E. LeMay Center for Doctrine Development and Education, Maxwell Air Force Base, Air Force History and Museums Program, in conjunction with Air Force Special Operations Command; by Forrest L. Marion, PhD; dated January 2018; last accessed 1 April 2020
  69. ^ AIRMAN Will Neville, of the 55th Security Force Squadron, waves incoming traffic onto Offutt Air Force Base, Nebraska. Neville and other 55th security forces personnel are participating in a US Strategic Command exercise, GLOBAL GUARDIAN '99, U.S. Navy's Naval Imaging Command, by PH2 Leland B. Comer (US Navy), dated 26 October 1998, last accessed 20 June 2021
  70. ^ TACP - Flash and Crest Heraldry, unknown author but suspected to be US Air Force, hosted on ClearedHotProduction YouTube Channel, posted 20 March 2012, last accessed 31 May 2020
  71. ^ 274th ASOS Change-of-Comand [sic] and Ribbon Cutting Ceremonies, 174attackwing.ang.af.mil, by SSgt James N. Faso, dated 4 June 2011, last accessed 8 March 2020
  72. ^ a b AFSC 13LX Air Liaison Officer, Career Field Education and Training Plan, Department of the Air Force, dated 21 May 2013, last accessed 5 March 2020
  73. ^ TACP Officer Assessment and Selection, Application Process, airforce.com, dated FY2020, last accessed 7 March 2020
  74. ^ "Garand Thumb," a US Air Force Air Liaison Officer and YouTuber, photographed in his service dress uniform, Facebook, public access photo (unrestricted), dated 27 September 2019, last accessed 30 December 2019
  75. ^ a b U.S. Army Europe, Clearing the DZ, US Army Europe Flickr page, dated 29 September 2011, last accessed 7 May 2020
  76. ^ a b c USAF, Air Mobility Liaison Officer, A-4-299, Department of the Army, The Institute of Heraldry (via the Eagles of War website), dated 20 January 2015, last accessed 6 September 2021
  77. ^ More than a pilot: providing air support from the ground, US Air Force, by A1C Daniel Phelps (20th Fighter Wing Public Affairs), dated 23 June 2011, last accessed 20 May 2020
  78. ^ a b Quiet Professionals don brown beret [Image 29 of 31], Defense Visual Infromation Distribution Service, by SrA Joseph Pick (1st Special Operations Wing Public Affairs), dated 6 January 2018, last accessed 6 June 2021
  79. ^ a b c Quiet Professionals don brown beret, AFSOC, by Capt Monique Roux (919th Special Operations Wing Public Affairs), dated 8 January 2018, last accessed 5 July 2018
  80. ^ Brown Water, Black Berets: Coastal and Riverine Warfare in Vietnam, Naval Institute Press, by Thomas J. Cutler, dated 2000, ISBN 1557501963, last accessed 24 October 2018
  81. ^ a b c River Patrol Force/River Patrol Flotilla Five (TF-116), Operation Game Warden, 8 November 1967 - 3 November 1968, by Thomas W. Glickman, dated 14 July 2008, last accessed 24 October 2018
  82. ^ NH 69307 Uniform, Naval History and Heritage Command, last accessed 13 April 2019
  83. ^ The Gamewardens Association, Vietnam to Present, Official home of Task Force 116 and the Brown Water Navy, last accessed 16 January 2021
  84. ^ 101123-N-9095H-009 CAPT K.C. Levins, commanding officer of Assault Craft Unit 4, awards Chief Hull Technician Nathanael Crossett a Bronze, by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Michael R. Hinchcliffe (US Navy), hosted on Wikimedia Commons, dated 23 November 2010, last accessed 16 January 2021
  85. ^ a b US Navy 110624-N-ZZ999-004 Electronics Technician 1st Class Edwin T. Benkin, right, receives the traditional black beret from Retired Capt. Bob Freed, by Intelligence Specialist 2nd Class Scott Solis (US Navy), hosted on Wikimedia Commons, dated 24 June 2011, last accessed 16 January 2021
  86. ^ US Navy Riverines wearing berets now?, SNAFU!, by "Solomon," dated 7 November 2014, last accessed 24 October 2018
  87. ^ Coastal Riverine Force establishment (Image 3 of 4), Defense Visual Information Distribution Service, by Petty Officer 1st Class Julian Olivari, dated 1 June 2012, last accessed 16 January 2021
  88. ^ 428-GX-USN 1142474, National Archives (2016/04/12)—hosted on Photograph Curator's Flickr page—by PH2 S.P. Langley (US Navy), dated August 1969, last accessed 21 June 2021
  89. ^ Army Flashes and Ovals, The Salute Uniforms, last accessed 20 October 2021
  90. ^ Beret Flashes and Background Trimmings in Alphabetica Order with TIOH Drawing Numbers, Eagles of War, last accessed 30 January 2021
  91. ^ U.S. Special Forces, Special Operations Forces and Airborne Units Insignia, Beret Flashes, United States Military Insignia, last accessed 4 January 2021
  92. ^ Evaluation of Department of Defense Interaction with State Defense Forces, Report No. DODIG-2014-065, Department of Defense Office of Inspector General, dated 30 April 2014, last accessed 26 May 2020
  93. ^ SDF Times, Spring 2017, State Guard Association of the United States, dated 2017, last accessed 3 May 2020—Note page 36 which pictures a Mississippi State Guardsman wearing the SDF Beret Flash
  94. ^ Wear and Appearance of California State Military Reserve Uniforms and Insignia, California State Military Reserve Regulation 670-1 and Instruction 36-2903, California State Military Reserve, dated 1 April 2008, last accessed 1 May 2020
  95. ^ Wear and Appearance of Uniforms and Insignia, Georgia State Defense Force Regulation 670-1, Georgia State Defense Force, dated 15 November 2009, last accessed 1 May 2020 (alternate source if required:[1])
  96. ^ Authorized Headgear-NYGD1334.1, New York Guard, dated 1 March 2015, last accessed 3 May 2020
  97. ^ Wear and Appearance of Uniforms and Insignia, Ohio Military Reserve Regulation 670-1, Ohio Military Reserve, dated 1 May 2012, last accessed 1 May 2020
  98. ^ Wear and Appearance of Virginia Defense Force Uniforms and Insignia, Virginia Defense Force Regulation 670-1, Virginia Defense Force, dated 1 February 2016, last accessed 1 May 2020
  99. ^ State Guard Units (starts at post #89), The US Militaria Forum, last accessed 30 January 2021
  100. ^ Districted of Colombia Defense Force, Commanding Generl Major General Reeder, Districted of Colombia Defense Force official Facebook page, dated 7 April 2014, last accessed 30 January 2021