United States military deployments

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US Troops presence oversea map as of 30 Sep 2021

The military of the United States is deployed in most countries around the world, with between 160,000 to 180,000 of its active-duty personnel stationed outside the United States and its territories.[1] This list consists of deployments excepting active combat deployments, including troops in Syria[2] and Yemen.[3]

Outside of active combat, US personnel are typically deployed as part of several peacekeeping missions, military attachés, or are part of embassy and consulate security. Nearly 40,000 are assigned to classified missions in locations that the US government refuses to disclose.[4]

Rationale[edit]

A longstanding justification for maintaining military installations worldwide for the United States is that a military presence abroad by the U.S. promotes and strengthens democracy.[5] According to Hermann and Kegley, military interventions have boosted democracy in other nations.[6] The majority of academics, however, concur with professor of international politics Abraham Lowenthal that American efforts to spread democracy have been "negligible, often counterproductive, and only occasionally positive"[6] [7][8] JoAnn Chirico believes that the U.S. military presence and installations are often considered responsible for suppressing democracy in countries such as Cameroon, Chad, Ethiopia, Jordan, Kuwait, Niger, Oman, Qatar and Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates.[5]

According to Los Angeles Times, American authorities also believe that assisting authoritarian regimes or what they refer to as "friendly governments" benefits the United States and other nations.[9] Journalist Glenn Greenwald states that the strategic justification for American support of dictatorships around the world has remained constant since World War II:

In a world where anti-American sentiment is prevalent, democracy often produces leaders who impede rather than serve U.S. interests ... None of this is remotely controversial or even debatable. U.S. support for tyrants has largely been conducted out in the open, and has been expressly defended and affirmed for decades by the most mainstream and influential U.S. policy experts and media outlets.[10]

In her essay, Dictatorships and Double Standards, Kirkpatrick argues that although the United States should encourage democracy, it should be understood that premature reforms may cause a backlash that could give the Communists an opportunity to take over. For this reason, she considered it legitimate to support non-communist dictatorships, adding that a successful and sustainable democratic process is likely to be a long-term process in many cases in the Third World. The essence of the so-called Kirkpatrick Doctrine is the use of selective methods to advance democracy in order to contain the wave of communism.[11]

Current deployments[edit]

The following regional tables provide detail of where personnel from five branches of the US military are currently deployed. These numbers do not include any military or civilian contractors, dependents or the United States Space Force. Additionally, countries in which US military are engaged in active combat operations are not included. The numbers are based on the most recent United States Department of Defense statistics as of June 30, 2022.[1]

Americas[edit]

Jurisdiction Total Army Navy USMC USAF USCG
 United States
(excl. Alaska & Hawaii)
1,100,974 377,154 290,400 138,547 259,375 35,498
 Alaska 20,674 10,000 43 27 8,799 1,805
Guantanamo Bay 594 135 422 32 5
 Honduras 363 210 3 21 128 1
 Puerto Rico 165 92 31 20 22
 Canada 145 16 38 15 72 4
 Greenland 140 140
other 688 122 140 320 75 31
Total 1,123,743 387,729 291,077 138,982 268,611 37,344

East Asia, Southeast Asia, and Pacific Ocean[edit]

Jurisdiction Total Army Navy USMC USAF USCG
 Japan 55,485 2,525 20,363 19,645 12,935 17
 Hawaii 40,966 15,515 12,384 6,215 5,539 1,313
South Korea 25,873 17,239 336 258 8,039 1
 Guam 6,447 211 3,955 113 2,168
 Australia 1,862 39 70 1,652 100 1
 Philippines 272 10 11 241 10
 Singapore 202 9 155 11 21 6
 Palau 106 106
 Thailand 101 30 11 37 23
other 287 62 31 166 24 4
Total 131,601 35,640 37,316 28,444 28,859 1,342

Europe[edit]

US military bases in Germany in 2014
Jurisdiction Total Army Navy USMC USAF USCG
 Germany 36,172 22,209 410 472 13,073 8
 Italy 12,477 4,244 3,306 147 4,778 2
United Kingdom 9,876 171 282 54 9,356 13
 Spain 3,535 27 3,034 93 380 1
 Belgium 1,147 630 85 36 396
 Poland 462 47 87 299 29
 Netherlands 434 141 28 18 216 31
 Greece 375 8 320 22 25
 Portugal 253 4 49 22 178
 Lithuania 236 5 2 226 3
 Romania 143 20 96 12 15
 Norway 99 23 14 26 36
other 629 95 62 334 133 5
Total 65,838 27,624 7,775 1,761 28,618 60

West Asia, Central Asia, South Asia, Africa, and Indian Ocean[edit]

Jurisdiction Total Army Navy USMC USAF USCG
 Bahrain 3,753 16 3,049 273 19 396
 Turkey 1,725 153 5 30 1,537
 Kuwait 753 619 4 80 50
 Qatar 443 169 4 41 229
 Djibouti 370 2 2 364 2
 Saudi Arabia 315 177 22 45 61 10
 Egypt 259 208 8 22 21
Diego Garcia 217 217
United Arab Emirates 189 26 21 63 79
 Iraq 153 6 1 144 2
 Jordan 115 63 3 35 14
 Israel 99 50 8 28 13
other 1,100 173 68 757 102
Total 9,491 1,662 3,412 1,882 2,129 406

Unspecified[edit]

Jurisdiction Total Army Navy USMC USAF USCG
Domestic
(50 states and District of Columbia)
7,716 7,716
Overseas
(incl. unincorporated US territories)
5,936 398 6 3,415 1,171 946
Total 13,652 8,114 6 3,415 1,171 946


See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Number of Military and DoD Appropriated Fund (APF) Civilian Personnel Permanently Assigned By Duty Location and Service/Component (as of June 30, 2022)". Defense Manpower Data Center. September 8, 2022.
  2. ^ Bo Williams, Katie (November 2, 2020). "Outgoing Syria Envoy Admits Hiding US Troop Numbers; Praises Trump's Mideast Record". Defense One.
  3. ^ "Letter to the Speaker of the House and President Pro Tempore of the Senate Regarding the War Powers Report". whitehouse.gov. December 7, 2021.
  4. ^ "America's Forever wars". New York Times. 23 October 2017.
  5. ^ a b Chirico 2014, p. 70.
  6. ^ a b Hermann, Margaret G.; Kegley, Charles (1998). "The U.S. Use of Military Intervention to Promote Democracy: Evaluating the Record". International Interactions. 24 (2): 91–114. doi:10.1080/03050629808434922.
  7. ^ Lowenthal, Abraham (1991). The United States and Latin American Democracy: Learning from History. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press. pp. 243–65.
  8. ^ Peceny, Mark (1999). Democracy at the Point of Bayonets. University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press. p. 183. ISBN 0-271-01883-6.
  9. ^ "U.S. Support of 'Dictators'". Los Angeles Times.
  10. ^ Greenwald 2017.
  11. ^ Wright 2007, p. 29.

Further reading[edit]