United States presidential election in Arizona, 1980

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
United States presidential election in Arizona, 1980

← 1976 November 4, 1980 1984 →

  Official Portrait of President Reagan 1981-cropped.jpg Carter cropped.jpg JohnAnderson.png
Nominee Ronald Reagan Jimmy Carter John B. Anderson
Party Republican Democratic Independent
Home state California Georgia Illinois
Running mate George H. W. Bush Walter Mondale Patrick Lucey
Electoral vote 6 0 0
Popular vote 529,688 246,843 76,952
Percentage 60.6% 28.2% 8.8%

Arizona Presidential Election Results 1980.svg
County Results

President before election

Jimmy Carter
Democratic

Elected President

Ronald Reagan
Republican

The 1980 United States presidential election in Arizona took place on November 4, 1980. All fifty states and The District of Columbia were part of the 1980 United States presidential election. Arizona voters chose six electors to the Electoral College, who voted for president and vice president.

Arizona was won by former California Governor Ronald Reagan by a landslide of 32 percentage points.[1] This result left the state 22.62 percentage points more Republican than the nation at-large, a differential greater even than when Barry Goldwater narrowly won his home state during his 1964 landslide defeat, and the most Republican relative to the nation at-large Arizona has ever been since statehood in 1912.[2] Reagan’s victory margin was at the time the largest by a Republican, though he would beat his own record four years later. Only Franklin Delano Roosevelt in 1932 and 1936 has won Arizona by a larger margin, whilst Carter’s share of the popular vote remains the worst ever by a Democrat in the Grand Canyon State.[2]

Reagan won every county except heavily unionized Greenlee, which would never vote Republican until 2000,[3] in the process matching the state’s 1972 county map. This stands as the last election when predominantly Native American Apache County has supported the Republican nominee.[4]

Carter’s insensitivity to essential issues in the West, especially water development,[5] ensured he would be comfortably beaten in this normally solidly Republican state, which had been the only state no Democrat carried during the dealigned 1960s and 1970s.

Results[edit]

United States presidential election in Arizona, 1980[1]
Party Candidate Votes Percentage Electoral votes
Republican Ronald Reagan 529,688 60.61% 6
Democrat Jimmy Carter (incumbent) 246,843 28.24% 0
Independent John Anderson 76,952 8.81% 0
Libertarian Ed Clark 18,784 2.15% 0
Socialist Workers Clifton DeBerry 1,110 0.13% 0
Citizens Barry Commoner 551 0.06% 0
Communist Gus Hall 25 0.00% 0
Workers World Deirdre Griswold 2 0.00% 0
Totals 873,945 100.00% 6
Voter turnout (Voting age/Registered voters) 44%/78%

Results by county[edit]

County Reagan# Reagan% Carter# Carter% Anderson# Anderson% Others# Others% Total votes cast
Apache 5,991 56.55% 3,917 36.97% 495 4.67% 192 1.81% 10,595
Cochise 13,351 59.48% 7,028 31.31% 1,656 7.38% 410 1.83% 22,445
Coconino 14,613 55.78% 7,832 29.89% 2,815 10.74% 939 3.58% 26,199
Gila 7,405 55.27% 5,068 37.82% 656 4.90% 270 2.02% 13,399
Graham 4,765 59.85% 2,801 35.18% 268 3.37% 127 1.60% 7,961
Greenlee 1,537 40.64% 2,043 54.02% 150 3.97% 52 1.37% 3,782
Maricopa 316,287 64.97% 119,752 24.60% 38,975 8.01% 11,820 2.43% 486,834
Mohave 13,809 68.86% 4,900 24.43% 978 4.88% 367 1.83% 20,054
Navajo 10,790 63.91% 5,110 30.27% 710 4.21% 272 1.61% 16,882
Pima 93,055 49.75% 64,418 34.44% 25,294 13.52% 4,290 2.29% 187,057
Pinal 12,195 52.43% 9,207 39.59% 1,346 5.79% 510 2.19% 23,258
Santa Cruz 2,674 50.07% 2,089 39.12% 482 9.03% 95 1.78% 5,340
Yavapai 19,823 68.37% 6,664 22.98% 1,754 6.05% 753 2.60% 28,994
Yuma 13,393 63.34% 6,014 28.44% 1,373 6.49% 365 1.73% 21,145
Totals 529,688 60.61% 246,843 28.24% 76,952 8.81% 20,462 2.34% 873,945

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "1980 Presidential General Election Results - Arizona". Uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved May 17, 2015.
  2. ^ a b Counting the Votes; Arizona
  3. ^ Menendez Albert J.; The Geography of Presidential Elections in the United States, p. 121 ISBN 0786422173
  4. ^ Sullivan, Robert David; ‘How the Red and Blue Map Evolved Over the Past Century’; America Magazine in The National Catholic Review; June 29, 2016
  5. ^ Reisner, Marc; Cadillac Desert: The American West and Its Disappearing Water; p. 11 ISBN 0140178244