1988 United States presidential election in Arizona

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United States presidential election in Arizona, 1988

← 1984 November 8, 1988 1992 →
  1988 Bush.jpg 1988 Dukakis.jpg
Nominee George H. W. Bush Michael Dukakis
Party Republican Democratic
Home state Texas Massachusetts
Running mate Dan Quayle Lloyd Bentsen
Electoral vote 7 0
Popular vote 702,541 454,029
Percentage 59.95% 38.74%

AZ1988.jpg
County Results
  Dukakis—60-70%
  Dukakis—50-60%
  Bush—<50%
  Bush—50-60%
  Bush—60-70%

President before election

Ronald Reagan
Republican

Elected President

George H. W. Bush
Republican

The 1988 United States presidential election in Arizona took place on November 8, 1988. All fifty states and the District of Columbia, were part of the 1988 United States presidential election. Arizona voters chose seven electors to the Electoral College, which selected the president and vice president.

Arizona was won by incumbent United States Vice President George H. W. Bush of Texas, who was running against Massachusetts Governor Michael Dukakis. Bush ran with Indiana Senator Dan Quayle as Vice President, and Dukakis ran with Texas Senator Lloyd Bentsen.

Arizona weighed in for this election as 6 percent more Republican than the national average.

Partisan background[edit]

The presidential election of 1988 was a very partisan election for Arizona, with nearly 99 percent of the electorate voting for either the Democratic or Republican parties.[1] Nearly every county turned out for Bush, with the exception of Native American Apache County and heavily unionized Greenlee County voting primarily for Dukakis.

As of the 2016 presidential election this is the last occasion when the counties of Santa Cruz, Pima and Coconino have given a plurality to a Republican presidential candidate.[2]

Republican victory[edit]

Bush won the election in the traditionally conservative and Republican state of Arizona with a solid 21 point margin. The election results in Arizona are reflective of a nationwide political reconsolidation of base for the Republican Party, which took place through the 1980s. Through the passage of some very controversial economic programs, spearheaded by then President Ronald Reagan (called, collectively, "Reaganomics"), the mid-to-late 1980s saw a period of economic growth and stability. The hallmark for Reaganomics was, in part, the wide-scale deregulation of corporate interests, and tax cuts for the wealthy.[3]

Dukakis ran on a notably socially liberal platform, and advocated for higher economic regulation and environmental protection. Bush, alternatively, ran on a campaign of continuing the social and economic policies of former President Reagan - which gained him much support with social conservatives and people living in rural areas. Additionally, while the economic programs passed under Reagan, and furthered under Bush and Clinton, may have boosted the economy for a brief period, they are criticized by many analysts as "setting the stage" for economic troubles in the United State after 2007, such as the Great Recession.[4]

Results[edit]

United States presidential election in Arizona, 1988
Party Candidate Votes Percentage Electoral votes
Republican George H. W. Bush 702,541 59.95% 7
Democratic Michael Dukakis 454,029 38.74% 0
Libertarian Ron Paul 13,351 1.14% 0
New Alliance Party Lenora Fulani 1,662 0.14% 0
Independent Eugene McCarthy 159 0.01% 0
America First David Duke 113 0.01% 0
Totals 1,171,873 100.00% 7

Results by county[edit]

George Herbert Walker Bush
Republican
Michael Stanley Dukakis
Democratic
Various candidates
Other parties
Margin Total votes cast
County # % # % # % # % #
Apache 5,347 36.76% 8,944 61.50% 253 1.74% -3,597 -24.73% 14,544
Cochise 15,815 56.38% 11,812 42.11% 423 1.51% 4,003 14.27% 28,050
Coconino 16,649 51.80% 14,660 45.61% 831 2.59% 1,989 6.19% 32,140
Gila 7,861 51.38% 7,147 46.72% 291 1.90% 714 4.67% 15,299
Graham 5,120 59.18% 3,407 39.38% 125 1.44% 1,713 19.80% 8,652
Greenlee 1,526 46.21% 1,733 52.48% 43 1.30% -207 -6.27% 3,302
La Paz 2,562 58.55% 1,746 39.90% 68 1.55% 816 18.65% 4,376
Maricopa 442,337 64.90% 230,952 33.89% 8,229 1.21% 211,385 31.02% 681,518
Mohave 17,651 62.40% 10,197 36.05% 438 1.55% 7,454 26.35% 28,286
Navajo 10,393 52.82% 9,023 45.86% 261 1.33% 1,370 6.96% 19,677
Pima 117,899 50.28% 113,824 48.54% 2,750 1.17% 4,075 1.74% 234,473
Pinal 14,966 51.29% 13,850 47.46% 364 1.25% 1,116 3.82% 29,180
Santa Cruz 3,320 49.63% 3,268 48.85% 102 1.52% 52 0.78% 6,690
Yavapai 27,842 64.44% 14,514 33.59% 850 1.97% 13,328 30.85% 43,206
Yuma 13,253 58.95% 8,952 39.82% 275 1.22% 4,301 19.13% 22,480
Totals 702,541 59.95% 454,029 38.74% 15,303 1.31% 248,512 21.21% 1,171,873

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "1988 Presidential General Election Results – Arizona". Dave Leip’s Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections. Retrieved 2013-07-21.
  2. ^ Sullivan, Robert David; ‘How the Red and Blue Map Evolved Over the Past Century’; America Magazine in The National Catholic Review; June 29, 2016
  3. ^ "Since 1980s, the Kindest of Tax Cuts for the Rich". The New York Times. 2012-01-18. Retrieved 2013-07-21.
  4. ^ Jerry Lanson (2008-11-06). "A historic victory. A changed nation. Now, can Obama deliver?". Christian Science Monitor. Retrieved 2013-07-21.