United States presidential election in Ohio, 2016

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United States presidential election in Ohio, 2016

← 2012 November 8, 2016 2020 →
Turnout 71.33% Increase [1]

 
Donald Trump official portrait (cropped).jpg
Hillary Clinton by Gage Skidmore 2.jpg
Nominee Donald Trump Hillary Clinton
Party Republican Democratic
Home state New York New York
Running mate Mike Pence Tim Kaine
Electoral vote 18 0
Popular vote 2,841,005 2,394,164
Percentage 51.69% 43.56%

Ohio Presidential Election Results 2016.svg
County Results


Ohio 2016 presidential results by county.png
Results by county showing number of votes by size and candidates by color[2]

President before election

Barack Obama
Democratic

Elected President

Donald Trump
Republican

Treemap of the popular vote by county.

The 2016 United States presidential election in Ohio was held on November 8, 2016, as part of the 2016 General Election in which all 50 states plus The District of Columbia participated. Ohio voters chose electors to represent them in the Electoral College via a popular vote pitting the Republican Party's nominee, real estate mogul Donald Trump, and running mate Indiana Governor Mike Pence against Democratic Party nominee, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and her running mate, Virginia Senator Tim Kaine.

Presidential primary elections for three parties were also held in Ohio, concurrently with Florida, Illinois, Missouri and North Carolina on March 15, 2016. In the Democratic primary, 143 delegates were awarded proportionally in a modified primary which was won by former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. In the Republican primary, John Kasich, the state's incumbent governor, won all of the state's 66 delegates.

Ohio was won by Donald Trump by a margin of 8.13 points. Prior to the election, most news organizations considered the Buckeye State as leaning Republican, due to his appeal to blue collar voters in the Rust Belt. Ohio kept its streak of voting for the winner (a bellwether state) since 1964, as it voted for Trump, who won nationally. Having voted Democratic in 2012 and 2008, the win margin was the second largest of the states Trump flipped red (after Iowa). It is also the largest victory margin since George H.W. Bush defeated Michael Dukakis in 1988.

Ohio was an unprecedented 10.2% more Republican than the national average in 2016, the farthest it had voted from the rest of the nation since 1932.

Primary elections[edit]

Republican primary[edit]

Ohio Republican primary, 2016

← 2012 March 15, 2016 2020 →

  Governor John Kasich.jpg Donald Trump official portrait (cropped).jpg Ted Cruz, official portrait, 113th Congress (cropped 2).jpg
Candidate John Kasich Donald Trump Ted Cruz
Home state Ohio New York Texas
Delegate count 66 0 0
Popular vote 993,886 713,404 264,640
Percentage 46.95% 35.87% 13.31%

Ohio Republican Presidential Primary Election Results by County, 2016.svg
Ohio results by county
  John Kasich
  Donald Trump

Results[edit]

Ohio Republican primary, March 15, 2016
Candidate Votes Percentage Actual delegate count
Bound Unbound Total
America Symbol.svg John Kasich 933,886 46.95% 66 0 66
Donald Trump 713,404 35.87% 0 0 0
Ted Cruz 264,640 13.31% 0 0 0
Marco Rubio 46,478 2.34% 0 0 0
Ben Carson (withdrawn) 14,351 0.72% 0 0 0
Jeb Bush (withdrawn) 5,398 0.27% 0 0 0
Mike Huckabee (withdrawn) 4,941 0.25% 0 0 0
Chris Christie (withdrawn) 2,430 0.12% 0 0 0
Carly Fiorina (withdrawn) 2,112 0.11% 0 0 0
Rick Santorum (withdrawn) 1,320 0.07% 0 0 0
Unprojected delegates: 0 0 0
Total: 1,988,960 100.00% 66 0 66
Source: The Green Papers

Democratic primary[edit]

Ohio Democratic primary, 2016

← 2012 March 15, 2016 2020 →

  Hillary Clinton by Gage Skidmore 2.jpg Bernie Sanders September 2015 cropped.jpg
Candidate Hillary Clinton Bernie Sanders
Home state New York Vermont
Delegate count 95 63
Popular vote 696,681 535,395
Percentage 56.12% 43.13%

Ohio Democratic Presidential Primary Election Results by County, 2016.svg
Ohio results by county
  Hillary Clinton
  Bernie Sanders

The Democratic Party's presidential primaries in Ohio were held on March 15, 2016, concurrently with primaries in Florida, Illinois, Missouri and North Carolina. The state's 143 pledged delegates to the 2016 Democratic National Convention were rewarded proportionally according to the statewide vote total. Three candidates appeared on the ballot for the primary – former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, Senator Bernie Sanders and businessman Rocky De La Fuente.

Background[edit]

By the time Ohio held its primaries, voters from 21 states and two territories already cast their vote for the presidential nomination of the Democratic Party. As of the March 12 elections, Hillary Clinton was projected to have earned 775 pledged delegates to Bernie Sanders' 552.[3] Clinton gained significant victories in the Southern United States, often described as her "firewall",[4] including landslide victories in Mississippi and Alabama and Georgia.[5][6] In contrast, Bernie Sanders managed to gain victories in the Midwestern United States,[7] where Ohio resides, including an upset victory in neighboring Michigan on March 8.[8][9] After the fact, Sanders' campaign took advantage of the momentum gained from the Michigan win, by targeting Illinois, Missouri and Ohio in the March 15 elections, hoping to repeat the same result. Sanders stated that "Not only is Michigan the gateway to the rest of the industrial Midwest, the results there show that we are a national campaign."[10]

Before the Michigan primaries, Clinton and Sanders had debated over economic policies relating to the industrial midwest states and the so-called "rust belt". The disagreements centered around trade deals, including the Trans-Pacific Partnership and Clinton's past support of the North American Free Trade Agreement, and its effect on economies such as Michigan and Ohio.[11][12]

Controversy[edit]

Ohio is one of at least seventeen states that has laws allowing voters who are 17 years of age, but will be 18 by the time of the general election, to vote in the presidential primaries.[13] However, Ohio Secretary of State Jon A. Husted had announced in December 2015 that 17 year olds would be outright barred from participating in the 2016 primaries. The rationale for the decision was based on an interpretation of the law in which 17 year olds could "nominate" officials for office, but not "elect". In the case of the presidential primaries, by definition, voters would be electing officials - delegates to each party's presidential nominating convention.[14] The decision was met with criticism by the public, after it was brought to mainstream attention by Representative Kathleen Clyde, after she condemned the rule in a statement released on March 5. Clyde described it as a "underhanded, backroom attack" against young voters.[15] Nine teenagers filed a lawsuit with the Ohio Courts of Common Pleas in Franklin County over the decision, stating that the decision contradicted state law and a decision by the Supreme Court of the United States that allowed 17 year olds turning 18 by the general election to vote.[16]

Bernie Sanders' campaign, whose voter base includes the majority of young voters,[17][18] also filed a lawsuit against the decision, accusing Husted of "arbitrarily" and "unconsititutionally" discriminating against young African-American and Latino voters, citing data from the 2010 United States Census that shows younger voters in Ohio were mostly African-American and Latino.[19][20] Husted, in response to Sanders' lawsuit, said in a public statement that he welcomed the lawsuit, further stating that "I am very happy to be sued on this issue because the law is crystal clear",[19] though, he later spoke out negatively against the lawsuit, claiming that it was "a last-minute political act", designed to "draw attention to his campaign."[21] Many Ohio officials, past and present, such as former Ohio Secretary of State Jennifer Brunner, came out in support of Sanders' lawsuit,[22] and had attracted protests by not only Bernie Sanders supporters, but also Donald Trump supporters as well.[23] In a decision handed down on March 11, an Ohio state judge ruled in favour of both lawsuits by the teenage group and the Sanders campaign, effectively lifting the ban on 17 year olds from voting in the Ohio presidential primaries.[24] Husted initially announced that he would appeal the ruling,[25] however, after learning that such an appeal wouldn't be heard by the court until the day before the primaries, he retracted his intent to appeal.[26]

Forums[edit]

March 13, 2016 – Columbus, Ohio

The ninth forum was held at 8:00 pm EDT on March 13, 2016, at the campus of Ohio State University in Columbus, Ohio, and aired on CNN.[27]

March 14, 2016 – Columbus, Ohio and Springfield, Illinois

The tenth forum was held at 6:00 pm EDT on March 14, 2016, at the campus of Ohio State University in Columbus, Ohio, and at the Old State Capitol State Historic Site (Illinois) in Springfield, Illinois. It aired on MSNBC. The first section of the town hall with Bernie Sanders was moderated by Chuck Todd; the second section of the town hall with Hillary Clinton was moderated by Chris Matthews.

Results[edit]

Ohio Democratic primary, March 15, 2016
Candidate Popular vote Estimated delegates
Count Percentage Pledged Unpledged Total
Hillary Clinton 696,681 56.12% 81 14 95
Bernie Sanders 535,395 43.13% 62 1 63
Rocky De La Fuente 9,402 0.76%
Uncommitted N/A 2 2
Total 1,241,478 100% 143 17 160
Source: The Green Papers

Green state convention[edit]

The Green Party of Ohio participated in the March 15 primaries in Ohio, though they did not hold their presidential primary during the event.[28] Instead, delegates to the Green National Convention were awarded based on presidential preference through a nominating convention in Columbus on April 3. Members of the Green Party of Ohio were able to vote in the convention.[29][30]

Ohio Green Party presidential convention, April 3, 2016[31]
Candidate Votes Percentage National delegates
America Symbol.svg Jill Stein - 61% 6
William Kreml - 19% 2
Sedinam Moyowasifza-Curry - 12% 1
Darryl Cherney - 5% -
Kent Mesplay - 3% -
Total - 100.00% 9

Polling[edit]

Republican National Convention[edit]

From July 17 through the 20th, Cleveland hosted the Republican Convention, which nominated Donald Trump and Mike Pence.

General election[edit]

Predictions[edit]

The following are final 2016 predictions from various organizations for Ohio as of Election Day.

  1. Los Angeles Times: Leans Clinton[32]
  2. CNN: Leans Trump[33]
  3. Sabato's Crystal Ball: Leans Trump[34]
  4. NBC: Tossup[35]
  5. Electoral-vote.com: Leans Trump[36]
  6. RealClearPolitics: Tossup[37]
  7. Fox News: Leans Trump[38]
  8. ABC: Leans Trump[39]

Results[edit]

Official state results from the Ohio Secretary of State are as follows

United States presidential election in Ohio, 2016
Party Candidate Running Mate Votes Percentage Electoral votes
Republican Donald Trump Mike Pence 2,841,005 51.69% 18
Democratic Hillary Clinton Tim Kaine 2,394,164 43.56% 0
Libertarian Gary Johnson William Weld 174,498 3.17% 0
Green Jill Stein Ajamu Baraka 46,271 0.84% 0
Independent Richard Duncan Ricky Johnson 24,235 0.44% 0
Write-ins Write-ins Write-ins 16,314 0.30% 0
Totals 5,496,487 100.00% 18

By county[edit]

County[40] Trump
Votes
Trump
%
Clinton
Votes
Clinton
%
Johnson
Votes
Johnson
%
Stein
Votes
Stein
%
Duncan
Votes
Duncan
%
Other
Votes
Other
%
Total
Adams 8,445 76.07 2,293 20.65 220 1.98 43 0.39 62 0.56 39 0.35 11,102
Allen 29,858 66.78 12,815 28.66 1,440 3.22 310 0.69 213 0.48 75 0.17 44,711
Ashland 17,169 71.08 5,659 23.43 888 3.68 180 0.75 178 0.74 80 0.32 24,154
Ashtabula 22,755 57.08 15,191 38.11 1,181 2.96 417 1.05 265 0.66 57 0.14 39,866
Athens 10,816 38.69 15,552 55.64 944 3.38 507 1.81 122 0.44 11 0.04 27,952
Auglaize 18,130 79.28 3,825 16.73 673 2.94 105 0.46 127 0.56 9 0.03 22,869
Belmont 20,729 67.79 8,652 28.30 760 2.49 186 0.61 210 0.69 40 0.12 30,577
Brown 14,257 74.31 4,270 22.25 419 2.18 102 0.53 91 0.47 48 0.26 19,257
Butler 104,441 61.77 56,700 33.53 5,612 3.32 1,119 0.66 550 0.33 669 0.39 169,091
Carroll 9,067 70.59 3,124 24.32 444 3.46 87 0.68 85 0.66 38 0.29 12,845
Champaign 12,314 69.80 4,488 25.44 555 3.15 140 0.79 100 0.57 44 0.25 17,641
Clark 34,311 57.43 22,666 37.94 1,831 3.06 492 0.82 320 0.54 120 0.21 59,740
Clermont 65,960 68.17 26,096 26.97 3,385 3.50 702 0.73 312 0.32 310 0.31 96,765
Clinton 13,466 74.21 3,943 21.73 488 2.69 125 0.69 78 0.43 47 0.25 18,147
Columbiana 31,086 68.47 12,273 27.03 1,368 3.01 313 0.69 221 0.49 142 0.31 45,403
Coshocton 10,381 69.17 3,908 26.04 447 2.98 112 0.75 113 0.75 47 0.31 15,008
Crawford 13,265 70.75 4,518 24.10 687 3.66 114 0.61 118 0.63 39 0.25 18,749
Cuyahoga 179,894 30.78 383,974 65.70 12,526 2.14 5,026 0.86 1,810 0.31 1,180 0.21 584,410
Darke 19,698 78.53 4,395 17.52 639 2.55 146 0.58 122 0.49 84 0.33 25,084
Defiance 11,478 64.24 5,282 29.56 766 4.29 144 0.81 125 0.70 72 0.40 17,867
Delaware 55,660 55.46 39,584 39.44 3,919 3.90 618 0.62 320 0.32 267 0.26 100,368
Erie 19,301 52.46 15,692 42.65 1,185 3.22 329 0.89 223 .61 60 0.14 36,790
Fairfield 43,163 60.90 24,150 34.07 2,341 3.30 529 0.75 359 0.51 334 0.47 70,876
Fayette 7,763 71.60 2,672 24.64 283 2.61 53 0.49 46 0.42 25 0.24 10,842
Franklin 199,331 33.93 351,198 59.78 19,725 3.36 6,106 1.04 1,866 0.32 9,298 1.58 587,524
Fulton 13,419 64.49 5,981 28.74 993 4.77 162 0.78 138 0.66 116 0.56 20,809
Gallia 9,567 75.91 2,564 20.34 282 2.24 94 0.75 81 0.64 15 0.12 12,603
Geauga 29,577 60.59 17,165 35.16 1,452 2.97 318 0.65 224 0.46 81 0.12 48,817
Greene 47,506 59.63 28,023 35.17 3,169 3.98 646 0.81 289 0.39 37 0.05 79,670
Guernsey 11,164 69.02 4,286 26.50 529 3.27 93 0.57 84 0.52 20 0.12 16,176
Hamilton 169,972 42.86 207,587 52.35 12,750 3.22 3,521 0.89 1,170 0.30 1,546 0.38 396,546
Hancock 23,777 67.21 9,419 26.63 1,493 4.22 312 0.88 215 0.61 160 0.45 35,376
Hardin 8,541 70.90 2,870 23.82 450 3.74 76 0.63 77 0.64 33 0.27 12,047
Harrison 5,021 72.07 1,663 23.87 171 2.45 51 0.73 50 0.72 11 0.16 6,967
Henry 9,136 66.83 3,690 26.99 638 4.67 108 0.79 99 0.72 0 0.00 13,671
Highland 13,005 76.12 3,436 20.11 428 2.51 95 0.56 84 0.49 36 0.21 17,084
Hocking 8,282 66.05 3,713 29.61 352 2.81 87 0.69 79 0.63 26 0.21 12,539
Holmes 8,578 78.85 1,766 16.23 369 3.39 48 0.44 62 0.57 56 0.52 10,879
Huron 15,930 65.32 7,080 29.03 897 3.68 186 0.76 239 0.98 57 0.23 24,389
Jackson 9,618 72.65 3,142 23.73 352 2.66 60 0.45 67 0.51 0 0.00 13,239
Jefferson 20,668 65.58 9,483 30.09 815 2.59 190 0.60 190 0.60 168 0.54 31,514
Knox 18,563 66.67 7,959 28.59 881 3.16 204 0.73 161 0.58 74 0.27 27,842
Lake 62,627 55.40 45,056 39.86 3,702 3.27 905 0.80 500 0.44 254 0.23 113,044
Lawrence 18,240 70.15 6,849 26.34 564 2.17 156 0.60 140 0.54 54 0.20 26,003
Licking 49,346 61.88 26,360 33.05 2,575 3.23 682 0.86 436 0.55 352 0.43 79,751
Logan 15,586 74.00 4,537 21.54 640 3.04 122 0.58 122 0.58 54 0.26 21,061
Lorain 66,818 47.24 66,949 47.34 4,548 3.22 1,255 0.89 735 0.52 396 0.79 140,305
Lucas 74,102 38.56 107,363 55.87 7,214 3.75 2,172 1.13 833 0.43 468 0.26 192,152
Madison 11,319 67.24 4,662 27.69 583 3.46 106 0.63 84 0.50 80 0.48 16,834
Mahoning 52,808 46.74 56,188 49.73 2,559 2.26 856 0.76 416 0.37 163 0.14 112,990
Marion 16,563 64.45 7,748 30.15 956 3.72 226 0.88 155 0.60 50 0.20 25,698
Medina 53,811 60.03 31,582 35.23 2,879 3.23 693 0.77 381 0.43 282 0.31 89,642
Meigs 6,869 72.94 2,157 22.91 263 2.79 59 0.63 62 0.66 7 0.07 9,417
Mercer 17,200 80.54 3,335 15.62 552 2.58 108 0.51 120 0.56 42 0.19 21,357
Miami 36,311 70.34 12,832 24.86 1,792 3.47 305 0.59 227 0.44 152 0.03 51,619
Monroe 4,781 71.48 1,647 24.62 161 2.41 36 0.54 61 0.91 3 0.04 6,689
Montgomery 120,766 48.25 117,661 47.01 8,085 3.23 2,183 0.87 865 0.35 713 0.29 250,273
Morgan 4,315 68.52 1,711 27.17 186 2.95 42 0.67 36 0.57 7 0.12 6,297
Morrow 11,722 72.12 3,711 22.83 555 3.41 98 0.60 100 0.62 67 0.42 16,253
Muskingum 23,588 65.02 10,926 30.12 1,215 3.35 251 0.69 237 0.65 63 0.17 36,280
Noble 4,441 75.54 1,201 20.43 148 2.52 34 0.58 51 0.87 4 0.06 5,879
Ottawa 12,389 56.89 8,136 37.36 935 4.29 143 0.66 139 0.64 36 0.16 21,778
Paulding 6,359 71.76 2,068 23.34 269 3.04 71 0.80 75 0.85 19 0.21 8,861
Perry 9,978 68.06 4,072 27.78 394 2.69 99 0.68 104 0.71 13 0.08 14,660
Pickaway 16,482 68.96 6,325 26.46 732 3.06 165 0.69 110 0.46 88 0.37 23,902
Pike 7,669 66.53 3,443 29.87 269 2.33 54 0.47 78 0.68 14 0.12 11,527
Portage 38,978 52.62 31,463 42.48 2,325 3.14 800 1.08 402 0.54 100 0.14 74,068
Preble 15,376 75.05 4,323 21.10 548 2.67 126 0.61 102 0.50 13 0.07 20,488
Putnam 14,704 79.73 2,874 15.58 626 3.39 69 0.37 114 0.62 55 0.10 18,442
Richland 35,805 66.44 15,629 29.00 1,586 2.94 373 0.69 346 0.64 155 0.29 53,894
Ross 17,833 61.45 9,905 34.13 869 2.99 198 0.68 150 0.52 65 0.23 29,020
Sandusky 16,045 58.29 9,733 35.36 1,229 4.46 302 1.10 182 0.66 35 0.13 27,526
Scioto 19,742 66.61 8,841 29.83 671 2.26 201 0.68 163 0.55 20 0.07 29,638
Seneca 14,559 61.86 7,237 30.75 1,270 5.40 236 1.00 179 0.76 56 0.23 23,537
Shelby 18,148 78.39 4,143 17.89 572 2.47 120 0.52 127 0.55 42 0.18 23,152
Stark 96,345 56.22 66,581 38.85 5,541 3.23 1,355 0.79 1,046 0.61 503 0.30 171,371
Summit 109,531 43.68 129,922 51.81 7,226 2.88 2,244 0.89 1,014 0.40 818 0.34 250,755
Trumbull 48,152 51.12 42,130 44.73 2,434 2.58 830 0.88 527 0.56 118 0.13 94,186
Tuscarawas 26,105 65.07 11,895 29.65 1,560 3.89 275 0.69 253 0.63 28 0.07 40,116
Union 17,601 65.94 7,530 28.21 1,088 4.08 196 0.73 118 0.44 161 0.60 26,694
Van Wert 10,328 76.03 2,667 19.63 419 3.08 102 0.75 68 0.50 0 0.00 13,584
Vinton 3,799 70.40 1,332 24.68 164 3.04 43 0.80 55 1.02 3 0.06 5,396
Warren 75,947 66.15 33,036 28.77 4,237 3.69 697 0.61 337 0.29 321 0.49 114,575
Washington 19,901 68.61 7,841 27.03 872 3.01 201 0.69 177 0.61 16 0.05 29,008
Wayne 31,622 64.82 14,670 30.07 1,586 3.25 364 0.75 308 0.63 233 0.48 48,783
Williams 11,706 68.92 4,287 25.24 690 4.06 124 0.73 131 0.77 46 0.28 16,984
Wood 31,734 50.78 26,440 42.31 3,133 5.01 642 1.03 338 0.54 210 0.33 62,497
Wyandot 7,346 70.50 2,484 23.84 424 4.07 83 0.80 59 0.57 24 0.22 10,420

Flipped counties[edit]

Trump won 80 of Ohio's 88 counties, the most since Ronald Reagan won 82 in 1984. He won nine counties that had voted for the Democratic candidate, Barack Obama, in 2012:

By congressional district[edit]

Trump won 12 of 16 congressional districts.[41]

District Trump Clinton Representative
1st 51% 45% Steve Chabot
2nd 56% 40% Brad Wenstrup
3rd 28% 67% Joyce Beatty
4th 64% 31% Jim Jordan
5th 59% 34% Bob Latta
6th 69% 27% Bill Johnson
7th 62% 33% Bob Gibbs
8th 65% 30% Warren Davidson
9th 37% 59% Marcy Kaptur
10th 51% 44% Mike Turner
11th 17% 81% Marcia Fudge
12th 53% 42% Pat Tiberi
13th 45% 51% Tim Ryan
14th 53% 42% David Joyce
15th 55% 40% Steve Stivers
16th 56% 39% Jim Renacci

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ https://www.sos.state.oh.us/elections/election-results-and-data/2016-official-elections-results/
  2. ^ 2016 Official Election Results by County (XLSX). Ohio Secretary of State.
  3. ^ "Who's Winning the Presidential Delegate Count?". Bloomberg. Bloomberg L.P. March 12, 2016. Archived from the original on March 12, 2016. Retrieved March 13, 2016. 
  4. ^ Tani, Maxwell (February 28, 2016). "It's now clear that Hillary Clinton's 'firewall' strategy is alive and well". Business Insider. Axel Springer SE. Retrieved March 13, 2016. 
  5. ^ Dowling, Brian (6 March 2016). "Hillary Clinton still strong in South, while Bernie Sanders stays alive". Boston Herald. Herald Media, Inc. Retrieved March 13, 2016. 
  6. ^ Bump, Philip (March 8, 2016). "Hillary Clinton's stunningly large win in Mississippi". The Washington Post. Nash Holdings LLC. Retrieved March 13, 2016. 
  7. ^ Riddell, Kelly (March 5, 2016). "Bernie Sanders' campaign gets needed boost with Kansas, Nebraska wins". The Washington Times. Operations Holdings (The Washington Times, LLC). Retrieved March 13, 2016. 
  8. ^ Nelson, Colleen McCain; Nicholas, Peter; Meckler, Laura (9 March 2016). "Bernie Sanders Scores Upset in Michigan Democratic Primary". The Wall Street Journal. News Corp. Retrieved March 13, 2016. 
  9. ^ Roberts, Dan; Jacobs, Ben; Gambino, Lauren (March 10, 2016). "Bernie Sanders beats Hillary Clinton in stunning Michigan primary upset". The Guardian. Guardian Media Group. Retrieved March 13, 2016. 
  10. ^ Roberts, Dan; Gambino, Lauren (March 10, 2016). "Sanders optimistic for more midwest upsets after shock Michigan win". The Guardian. Guardian Media Group. Retrieved March 13, 2016. 
  11. ^ Meckler, Laura; Nicholas, Peter (March 3, 2016). "Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton Spar Over Trade in Midwest". The Wall Street Journal. News Corp. Retrieved March 13, 2016. 
  12. ^ Davis, Owen (March 7, 2016). "Free Trade And Flint: What Sanders And Clinton Got Right And Wrong On Nafta". International Business Times. IBT Media. Retrieved March 13, 2016. 
  13. ^ "Primaries - Where Can 17-Year-Olds Vote in Presidential Primaries or Caucuses?". FairVote. Retrieved March 13, 2016. 
  14. ^ Perkins, William T. (March 5, 2016). "17-year-olds shut out of presidential primary". The Columbus Dispatch. New Media Investment Group. Retrieved March 13, 2016. 
  15. ^ Naymik, Mark (March 8, 2016). "Ohio 17-year-olds' presidential picks in Tuesday's primary won't count but pressure building to change the rule". Cleveland.com (The Plain Dealer). Advance Publications / Newhouse Newspapers. Retrieved March 13, 2016. 
  16. ^ O'Brien, Brendan (March 8, 2016). "Ohio 17-year-olds sue state for right to vote in primary". Reuters. Thomson Reuters. Retrieved March 13, 2016. 
  17. ^ Heller, Nathan (August 25, 2015). "Feeling the Bern With the Youth Vote". The New Yorker. Advance Publications. Retrieved March 13, 2016. 
  18. ^ Silver, Nate (February 8, 2016). "Why Young Democrats Love Bernie Sanders". FiveThirtyEight. ESPN Inc. Retrieved March 13, 2016. 
  19. ^ a b Alcindor, Yamiche (March 8, 2016). "Bernie Sanders Sues Over Ohio Rule Barring 17-Year-Olds From Primary". The New York Times. The New York Times Company. Retrieved March 13, 2016. 
  20. ^ Morice, Jane (March 8, 2016). "Bernie Sanders' campaign files young voters lawsuit against Ohio Secretary of State Jon Husted". Cleveland.com (The Plain Dealer). Advance Publications / Newhouse Newspapers. Retrieved March 13, 2016. 
  21. ^ Gaudiano, Nicole (March 11, 2016). "Ohio official calls Bernie Sanders' lawsuit a 'political act'". USA Today. Gannett Company. Retrieved March 13, 2016. 
  22. ^ Larson, Erik (March 12, 2016). "Sanders Preparing for Battle Over Ohio's 17-Year-Old Voters". Bloomberg. Bloomberg L.P. Retrieved March 13, 2016. 
  23. ^ Atkin, Emily (March 11, 2016). "Meet The Young Donald Trump Supporters Who Drove 100 Miles To Protest With Bernie Sanders Supporters". ThinkProgress. Center for American Progress. Retrieved March 13, 2016. 
  24. ^ Atkinson, Khorri (March 12, 2016). "Sanders campaign praises Ohio ruling that allows 17-year-olds to vote". MSNBC. NBCUniversal. Retrieved March 13, 2016. 
  25. ^ Palmer, Kim (March 11, 2016). "17-Year-Olds Should Be Allowed To Vote In Ohio Primary, Judge Rules". The Huffington Post. AOL. Retrieved March 13, 2016. 
  26. ^ LoBianco, Tom (March 12, 2016). "In victory for Sanders, Ohio judge says 17-year-olds can vote in primary". CNN. Turner Broadcasting System (Time Warner). Retrieved March 13, 2016. 
  27. ^ "CNN, TV One to host presidential town hall". CNN. March 13, 2016. Retrieved March 13, 2016. 
  28. ^ The Columbus Dispatch staff (14 March 2016). "Here are the 14 presidential candidates on Ohio primary ballots". The Columbus Dispatch. New Media Investment Group. Retrieved 17 March 2016. 
  29. ^ "Ohio Green Party Announces 2016 candidates and Presidential Nominating Convention date". Ohio Green Party. 2016-01-05. Retrieved 2016-02-20. 
  30. ^ "Ohio Green Party Presidential Nominating Convention (Columbus)". Ohio Green Party. 2016-01-05. Retrieved 2016-02-20. 
  31. ^ "Stein wins Ohio Green Party convention vote". Green Party Watch. 3 April 2016. Retrieved 3 April 2016. 
  32. ^ "Our final map has Clinton winning with 352 electoral votes. Compare your picks with ours". Los Angeles Times. 2016-11-06. Retrieved 2016-11-13. 
  33. ^ "Road to 270: CNN's general election map - CNNPolitics.com". Cnn.com. 2016-11-08. Retrieved 2016-11-13. 
  34. ^ "Larry J. Sabato's Crystal Ball » 2016 President". Centerforpolitics.org. 2016-11-07. Retrieved 2016-11-13. 
  35. ^ Todd, Chuck. "NBC's Final Battleground Map Shows Clinton With a Significant Lead". NBC News. Retrieved 2016-11-13. 
  36. ^ "ElectoralVote". ElectoralVote. 2000-12-31. Retrieved 2016-11-13. 
  37. ^ "2016 Election Maps - Battle for White House". RealClearPolitics. Retrieved 2016-11-13. 
  38. ^ "Electoral Scorecard: Map shifts again in Trump's favor, as Clinton holds edge". Fox News. 2016-11-07. Retrieved 2016-11-13. 
  39. ^ "The Final 15: The Latest Polls in the Swing States That Will Decide the Election". Abcnews.go.com. 2016-11-07. Retrieved 2016-11-13. 
  40. ^ "Ohio Decides - Election Night Reporting". Vote.ohio.gov. 2016-11-08. Retrieved 2016-11-13. 
  41. ^ http://www.swingstateproject.com/diary/4161/

External links[edit]