United States presidential election in the District of Columbia, 2012

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United States presidential election in the District of Columbia, 2012
Washington, D.C.
← 2008 November 6, 2012 2016 →
  President Barack Obama, 2012 portrait crop.jpg Mitt Romney by Gage Skidmore 8.jpg
Nominee Barack Obama Mitt Romney
Party Democratic Republican
Home state Illinois Massachusetts
Running mate Joe Biden Paul Ryan
Electoral vote 3 0
Popular vote 267,070 21,381
Percentage 90.9% 7.3%

District of Columbia presidential election results by ward, 2012.svg
Ward Results
Obama
  80-90%
  >90%

President before election

Barack Obama
Democratic

Elected President

Barack Obama
Democratic

The 2012 United States presidential election in the District of Columbia took place on November 6, 2012 as part of the 2012 General Election in which all 50 states plus The District of Columbia participated. D.C. voters chose three electors to represent them in the Electoral College via a popular vote pitting incumbent Democratic President Barack Obama and his running mate, Vice President Joe Biden, against Republican challenger and former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney and his running mate, Congressman Paul Ryan. Obama and Biden carried the District of Columbia with 90.9% of the popular vote to Romney's and Ryan's 7.3%, thus winning the district's three electoral votes.[1] As of 2017, this is the only election since 1988 when the District failed to return a Democratic margin of victory higher than the district had then ever returned in any prior election.

General election[edit]

Candidate Ballot Access:

  • Mitt Romney/Paul Ryan, Republican
  • Barack Obama/Joseph Biden, Democratic
  • Gary Johnson/James P. Gray, Libertarian
  • Jill Stein/Cheri Honkala, Green

Write-In Candidate Access:

  • Virgil Goode/Jim Clymer, Constitution
  • Rocky Anderson/Luis J. Rodriguez, Justice

Election results[edit]

United States presidential election in the District of Columbia, 2012
Party Candidate Running mate Votes Percentage Electoral votes
Democratic Barack Obama Joe Biden 267,070 90.9% 3
Republican Mitt Romney Paul Ryan 21,381 7.3% 0
Green Jill Stein Cheri Honkala 2,458 0.8% 0
Libertarian Gary Johnson James P. Gray 2,083 0.7% 0
Others Others Others 772 0.3% 0
Totals 293,764 100.00% 3
Voter turnout  ???

Template:ElectionsDC

Democratic primary[edit]

President Obama was the only candidate in the primary. The District cast all 45 of its delegate votes at the 2012 Democratic National Convention for Obama.[2]

District of Columbia Democratic primary, 2012[3]
Candidate Votes Percentage Delegates
Barack Obama 56,503 96.23% 22
Uncommitted 1,100 1.87% 0
Under votes 725 1.23% 0
Write-ins 386 0.66% 0
Unpledged delegates: 23
Total: 58,714 100% 45

Republican primary[edit]

District of Columbia Republican primary, 2012
Washington, D.C.
← 2008 April 3, 2012 (2012-04-03) 2016 →
  Mitt Romney by Gage Skidmore 8.jpg Ron Paul, official Congressional photo portrait, 2007.jpg
Candidate Mitt Romney Ron Paul
Home state Massachusetts Texas
Delegate count 18 0
Popular vote 3,577 621
Percentage 70.08% 12.17%

  Newt Gingrich by Gage Skidmore 6.jpg Ambassador Jon Huntsman.jpg
Candidate Newt Gingrich Jon Huntsman
Home state Georgia Utah
Delegate count 0 0
Popular vote 558 348
Percentage 10.93% 6.82%

District of Columbia Republican presidential primary election results by ward, 2012.svg
District of Columbia results by ward
  Mitt Romney
(Note: Italicization indicates a withdrawn candidacy)

The District of Columbia Republican 2012 primary was held on April 3, 2012,[4][5][6] the same day as the Maryland and Wisconsin Republican primaries.

The District of Columbia Republican Party required a $5,000 contribution, signatures from one percent of registered Republicans, and the names of 16 potential delegates and 16 alternate delegates, who then must register with the District of Columbia Office of Campaign Finance.[7][8] Alternatively, under II.D.1(c) a candidate need not file signatures with a $10,000 contribution.[8] The District of Columbia Republican Party certified Newt Gingrich and Ron Paul in lieu of petitions under II.D.1(c).[9] Rick Santorum was not included on the ballot because he did not meet these requirements.[7][9]

The District of Columbia Republican Party decided not to allow write-in votes for the primary.[10]

The candidate with the most votes in the primary, Mitt Romney, was awarded sixteen delegates.[11] Romney received the most votes in each of the District of Columbia's eight wards, receiving the majority of votes in wards 1, 2, 3, 4, and 6, and a plurality of votes in wards 5, 7, and 8.[12] Paul received the second most votes in wards 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, and 8, while Gingrich received the second most votes in wards 3 and 7.[12] Romney also received the most votes, or tied for the most votes, in 129 of the 143 voting precincts.[13]

The District of Columbia's three superdelegates are Chairman Bob Kabel, Republican National Committeewoman Betsy Werronen, and Republican National Committeeman Tony Parker.[14] Kabel and Werronen both support Mitt Romney.[14][15] Other delegates for the District of Columbia include Patrick Mara and Rachel Hoff.[16]

Jill Homan and Bob Kabel were elected National Committeewoman and the National Committeeman, respectively.[17] They will both take office after the end of the 2012 Republican National Convention.[18]

District of Columbia Republican primary, 2012[19]
Candidate Votes Percentage Delegates
America Symbol.svg Mitt Romney 3,577 70.08% 18
Ron Paul 621 12.17% 0
Newt Gingrich 558 10.93% 0
Jon Huntsman 348 6.82% 0
Unprojected delegates: 1
Under votes 153
Total: 5,257 100% 19
Key: Withdrew prior to contest

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "2012 Presidential Election - District of Columbia". Politico. Retrieved 22 November 2012. 
  2. ^ "District of Columbia Democratic Delegation 2012". www.thegreenpapers.com. Retrieved 2016-07-14. 
  3. ^ "District of Columbia Democratic Delegation 2012". www.thegreenpapers.com. Retrieved 2016-06-19. 
  4. ^ "Primary and Caucus Printable Calendar". CNN. Retrieved January 22, 2012. 
  5. ^ "Presidential Primary Dates" (PDF). Federal Election Commission. Retrieved January 23, 2012. 
  6. ^ "Washington DC Republican Presidential Nominating Process". The Green Papers. Retrieved March 10, 2012. 
  7. ^ a b Howell Jr, Tom (December 29, 2011). "Romney 1st candidate to qualify for D.C. primary". The Washington Times. 
  8. ^ a b DRAFT 2012 Primary Plan.pdf "Draft Election Rules and Plan for the 2012 Presidential Preference Primary" Check |url= value (help) (pdf). District of Columbia Republican Party. Retrieved April 24, 2012. 
  9. ^ a b "Candidates to Appear on the Ballot for the April 3, 2012 Primary Election". District of Columbia Board of Elections and Ethics. March 9, 2012. Retrieved April 13, 2012. 
  10. ^ "District of Columbia Voter Guide: April 2, 2012 Primary Election" (pdf). District of Columbia Board of Elections. 2012. p. 17. 
  11. ^ Lightman, David (April 2, 2012). "Romney May Win More Delegates in Maryland, D.C. Than In Wisconsin". Kansas City Star. McClatchy Newspapers. 
  12. ^ a b "Unofficial Election Results: District of Columbia Primary Election - April 3, 2012". District of Columbia Board of Elections and Ethics. April 4, 2012. Retrieved April 4, 2012. 
  13. ^ "Download all precinct results in CSV (text) format" (csv). District of Columbia Board of Elections and Ethics. April 4, 2012. Retrieved April 4, 2012. 
  14. ^ a b "2012 GOP Superdelegate Endorsement List". Democratic Convention Watch. Retrieved April 23, 2012. 
  15. ^ "D.C. Voter Registration Deadline Monday". NBCUniversal, Inc. Associated Press. March 5, 2012. 
  16. ^ Hockenbery, John (August 28, 2012). "Republican Delegates from DC: The Realities of the 'Seven Percent'". The Takeaway. WNYC. 
  17. ^ "Unofficial Election Results: District of Columbia Primary Election - April 3, 2012". District of Columbia Board of Elections and Ethics. April 4, 2012. Retrieved April 4, 2012. 
  18. ^ Wright, James (February 15, 2012). "D.C. Political Roundup". The Washington Informer. 
  19. ^ "Presidential Primary Official Results" (pdf). District of Columbia Board of Elections and Ethics. April 19, 2012. 

External links[edit]