United States v. Fenwick

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United States v. Fenwick
United States Circuit Court of the District of Columbia
April 1836 Term
Full case name: United States v. Fenwick
Citations: United States v. Fenwick, 25 F. Cas. 1062, 1964 (C.C. D.C. 1836)
Prior history: Judgment for the Appellant, appeal from the United States District Court of the District of Columbia
Holding
Conviction for rioting
Court membership
Circuit Judges William Cranch
Case opinions
Majority by: William Cranch, for the Court
Laws applied

United States v. Fenwick, United States v. Fenwick, 25 F. Cas. 1062, 1964 (C.C. D.C. 1836), was a decision of the United States Circuit Court of the District of Columbia that was handed down April 7, 1836. It confirmed the right of a defendant in a criminal case not to have the judge render a decision on motions until all arguments have been made, to defer making those arguments until the jury is empaneled, and to make those legal arguments to the jury.

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