United States v. United Mine Workers of America

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United States v. United Mine Workers
Seal of the United States Supreme Court.svg
Argued January 14, 1947
Decided March 6, 1947
Full case name United States v. United Mine Workers of America
Citations 330 U.S. 258 (more)
67 S. Ct. 677; 91 L. Ed. 884; 1947 U.S. LEXIS 2954; 12 Lab. Cas. (CCH) P51,239; 19 L.R.R.M. 2346
Prior history Cert. to the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia
Court membership
Case opinions
Plurality Vinson, joined by Reed, Jackson, Burton
Concurrence Frankfurter
Concur/dissent Black, Douglas
Dissent Murphy
Dissent Rutledge

United States v. United Mine Workers, 330 U.S. 258 (1947), was a case in which the United States Supreme Court examined whether a trial court acted appropriately when it issued a restraining order to prevent a labor strike organized by coal miners.[1] In an opinion written by Chief Justice Fred M. Vinson, the Court held that a restraining order and preliminary injunction prohibiting a strike did not violate the Clayton Antitrust Act or the Norris–La Guardia Act,[2] that the trial court was authorized to punish the violation of its orders as criminal contempt,[3]and that fines imposed by the trial court were warranted in the situation.[4]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ United States v. United Mine Workers, 330 U.S. 258, 267-69 (1947).
  2. ^ United Mine Workers, 330 U.S. at 269.
  3. ^ United Mine Workers, 330 U.S. at 289.
  4. ^ United Mine Workers, 330 U.S. at 269.

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