Universal access to education

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Not to be confused with Compulsory education.

Universal access to education is the ability of all people to have equal opportunity in education, regardless of their social class, gender, ethnicity background or physical and mental disabilities. The term is used both in college admission for the middle and lower classes, and in assistive technology for the disabled. Some critics find this idea an example of "political correctness". In order to facilitate the access of education to all, countries have right to education.

Universal access to education encourages a variety of pedagogical approaches to accomplish the dissemination of knowledge across the diversity of social, cultural, economic, national and biological backgrounds. Initially developed with the theme of equal opportunity access and inclusion of students with learning or physical and mental disabilities, the themes governing universal access to education have now expanded across all forms of ability and diversity. However, as the definition of diversity is within itself is a broad amalgamation, teachers exercising universal access will continually face challenges and incorporate adjustments in their lesson plan to foster themes of equal opportunity of education.

As universal access continues to be incorporated into the U.S. education system, professors and instructors at the college level are required (in some instances by law) to rethink methods of facilitating universal access in their classrooms. Universal access to college education may involve the provision of a variety of different assessment methods of learning and retention. For example, in order to determine how much of the material was learned, a professor may enlist multiple methods of assessment. Methods of assessment may include a comprehensive exam, unit exams, portfolios, research papers, literature reviews, an oral exam or homework assignments. Providing a variety of ways to assess the extent of learning and retention will not only identify the gaps in universal access but may also elucidate the ways to improve universal access.

Access to Education By Law[edit]

In 2009 the House of Indian Parliament and the President of India both signed and approved a bill that would grant free law mandated education for children ages six to fourteen.[1] It was a great step towards universal education for all. Muchkund Dubey author of the article “The Right of Children to Free and Compulsory Education Act, 2009 : The Story of Missed Opportunity discusses and highlights the issues of access, quality of education, financial implication, and discrimination.[2]

In the United States, Brown vs. Board of Education was a landmark decision because it found and declared that, “separate educational facilities are inherently unequal”.[3] This began the process of desegregation in many schools that had not desegregated yet.[4] The significance of Brown vs. Board was the universal right of all students to attend educational institutions equally rather than separately based on their race. Jonathan Kozol, author of The Shame of the Nation, talks about how “physical conditions in these newly integrated schools were generally more cheerful…state of mind among the teachers and the children [was] more high-spirited” in the aftermath of desegregation.[5]

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References[edit]

  1. ^ Dubey, Muchkund (2010). "The Right of Children to Free and Compulsory Education Act, 2009: The Story of a Missed Opportunity". Social Change. 40: 1–13. doi:10.1177/004908570904000102. 
  2. ^ Dubey, Muchkund (2010). "The Right of Children to Free and Compulsory Education Act, 2009: The Story of a Missed Opportunity". Social Change. 40: 1–13. doi:10.1177/004908570904000102. 
  3. ^ "Brown v. Board at Fifty: "With an Even Hand"". Library of Congress. Library Of Congress. Retrieved 2 December 2016. 
  4. ^ Kozol, Jonathan (2005). The Shame of the Nation : The Restoration of Apartheid Schooling in America. New York: Crown Publishing Group. p. 6. 
  5. ^ Kozol, Jonathan (2005). The Shame of the Nation: The Restoration of Apartheid Schooling in America. New York: Crown Publishing Group. p. 6.