University of Alabama School of Law

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Hugh F. Culverhouse Jr. School of Law
Parent school University of Alabama
Established 1872
School type Public
Dean Mark E. Brandon [1]
Location Tuscaloosa, Alabama, U.S.
33°12′39″N 87°32′46″W / 33.2109°N 87.5462°W / 33.2109; -87.5462Coordinates: 33°12′39″N 87°32′46″W / 33.2109°N 87.5462°W / 33.2109; -87.5462
Enrollment 409 (approx.)
Faculty 50 full-time; 40 adjunct
USNWR ranking 26 [2]
Bar pass rate 97% (Official ABA Data)
Website www.law.ua.edu
ABA profile [1]

The Hugh F. Culverhouse Jr. School of Law at The University of Alabama[3][4] (formerly known as the University of Alabama School of Law; also known as Alabama Law) located in Tuscaloosa, Alabama is a nationally ranked top-tier law school (First Tier) [5] and the only public law school in the state. It is one of five law schools in the state, and one of three that are ABA accredited. According to Alabama's official 2017 ABA-required disclosures, 84% of the Class of 2017 obtained full-time, long-term, JD-required employment nine months after graduation. An additional 8.4% of the Class of 2017 obtained JD-advantage employment.[6]

The diverse student body, of approximately 409 JD students, represent 58 undergraduate institutions from 28 states and 2 countries outside the U.S.[7]

Academics[edit]

The School of Law offers the Juris Doctor (J.D.) degree, as well as an International LL.M., an LL.M. in Taxation, and an LL.M. in Business Transactions. A joint J.D./M.B.A. program is also available. Students may also pursue a number of graduate degrees through established dual enrollment programs for M.A. or Ph.D. in Political Science, M.P.A., Ph.D. in Economics, or LL.M. in Taxation. In addition, a Certificate in Public Interest Law is available through the Public Interest Institute.

Admissions have become increasingly selective with the 50th percentile LSAT and undergrad GPAs of the 2016 incoming class reaching 163 and 3.82, respectively. The 75% to 25% range for these metrics was from 165-157 and 3.92 to 3.45.[8]

Law clinics[edit]

Students are guaranteed an opportunity to participate in at least one of the school's seven law clinics.[9]

  • Capital Defense Clinic provides assistance to counsel in capital cases.
  • Civil Law Clinic handles over 200 cases a year.
  • Community Development Clinic helps community organizations with everything from tax exemption to licensing requirements.
  • Criminal Defense Clinic defends over 100 indigent clients a year through the Public Defender's Office.
  • Domestic Violence Clinic provides free legal aid in civil matters such as divorce, custody, orders for protection from abuse.
  • Elder Law Clinic represents seniors over 60 in a range of matters including Medicare/Medicaid, durable powers of attorney, protection from abuse, etc.
  • Mediation Law Clinic trains students to mediate and settle family-related legal disputes.

Publications[edit]

In 2007 Jarvis & Coleman ranked the Alabama Law Review (ALR) 36th "on the basis of the prominence of their lead article authors."[10] This represents an incredible 63 position improvement from the rankings of ten years prior. For 2015-2016, ExpressO, UC Berkeley's manuscript submission service, ranked the ALR at 10th in terms of "number of manuscripts received."[11] In 2015 Washington and Lee's methods rank ALR at 46th in both the number of citations from other journals and the combined score.[12] These show an improvement of 10 and 26 positions, respectively, over the preceding 5 years.

Approximately 40% of students graduate with journal experience. This is a slightly lower percentage than many of Alabama's peer schools, but nonetheless above the national average.

Employment[edit]

According to Alabama's official 2017 ABA-required disclosures, 83.2% of the Class of 2016 obtained full-time, long-term, bar passage required employment within nine months after graduation.[6] Alabama's Law School Transparency under-employment score for 2016 is 11%, indicating the percentage of the Class of 2016 who were unemployed, pursuing an additional degree, or working in a non-professional, short-term, or part-time job nine months after graduation.[17]

ABA Employment Summary for 2017 Graduates [18]
Employment Status Percentage
Employed - Bar Passage Required
84%
Employed - J.D. Advantage
8.4%
Employed - Professional Position
0.0%
Employed - Non-Professional Position
0.8%
Employed - Undeterminable
0.0%
Pursuing Graduate Degree Full Time
2.3%
Unemployed - Start Date Deferred
0.8%
Unemployed - Not Seeking
1.5%
Unemployed - Seeking
1.5%
Employment Status Unknown
0.0%
Total of 131 Graduates

Costs[edit]

The total cost of attendance (indicating the cost of tuition, fees, and living expenses) at Alabama for the 2016-2017 academic year is $29,702 for residents and $47,322 for nonresidents.[19] 79.4% of students received discounts in 2015-2016; the remaining 20.6% paid full price. The Law School Transparency estimated debt-financed cost of attendance for three years at full price is $151,016 for residents and $213,352 for nonresidents.[20]

Notable alumni[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Law, University of Alabama School of. "Brandon Named Dean of Alabama Law - The University of Alabama - School of Law". www.law.ua.edu.
  2. ^ "University of Alabama – Law School Overview".
  3. ^ "UA Law School Named for Hugh F. Culverhouse Jr. in Recognition of $26.5 Million Donation Data". law.ua.edu. UA Law School. September 20, 2018. Retrieved 2018-09-20.
  4. ^ Report, Staff (September 20, 2018). "Sarasota developer Hugh Culverhouse Jr. donates millions to University of Alabama law school". heraldtribune.com. Sarasota Herald Tribune. Retrieved 2018-09-20. Text "Data" ignored (help)
  5. ^ "Best Graduate Schools; University of Alabama". US News & World Report. Retrieved 2011-05-14.
  6. ^ a b "Employment Summary for 2017 Graduates" (PDF).
  7. ^ "Quick Facts". UA School of Law. Retrieved 2018-04-15.
  8. ^ "The University of Alabama School of Law, ABA Law School Data" (PDF). ABA. Retrieved 2017-04-15.
  9. ^ "Academics; Law Clinics". The University of Alabama School of Law. Retrieved 2010-08-28.
  10. ^ "Ranking Law Reviews by Author Prominence -- Ten Years Later" (PDF). Law Library Journal. p. 577.
  11. ^ "2015-16 Top 100 Law Reviews" (PDF). Bepress.
  12. ^ "Law Journals: Submissions and Ranking". Washington and Lee University School of Law. Archived from the original on 2006-03-07. Retrieved 2016-06-07.
  13. ^ "Alabama Civil Rights and Civil Liberties Law Review". University of Alabama School of Law. Retrieved 13 October 2015.
  14. ^ "Alabama Law Review". University of Alabama School of Law. Retrieved 13 October 2015.
  15. ^ "Journal of the Legal Profession". University of Alabama School of Law. Retrieved 13 October 2015.
  16. ^ "Law & Psychology Review". University of Alabama School of Law. Retrieved 13 October 2015.
  17. ^ "University of Alabama Profile".
  18. ^ "ABA School Employment Summary Reports".
  19. ^ "Tuition and Expenses".
  20. ^ "University of Alabama Profile".
  21. ^ "Harper Lee". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved 15 December 2012.
  22. ^ "Edward B. Almon". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved 15 December 2012.
  23. ^ "James Allen". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved 15 December 2012.
  24. ^ "Mel Allen". NNDB Soylent Communications. Retrieved 15 December 2012.
  25. ^ "John W. Abercrombie". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved 15 December 2012.
  26. ^ "Spencer Bachus". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved 15 December 2012.
  27. ^ "Hugo Black". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved 15 December 2012.
  28. ^ "Emmett Ripley Cox". Biographical Directory of Federal Judges. Retrieved 15 December 2012.
  29. ^ Monroe, Carla R. "Morris Dees | biography – American civil rights lawyer". Britannica.com. Retrieved 2017-04-24.
  30. ^ "Fuller, Mark E." United States Federal Courts. 2008. Retrieved 2008-05-17.
  31. ^ Victor Gold profile, June 29, 2007, Bill Moyers Journal website.
  32. ^ "[Perry O. Hooper, Sr". Alabama Department of Archives and History. Retrieved 15 December 2012.
  33. ^ "Frank Minis Johnson". Alabama Department of Archives and History. Retrieved 15 December 2012.
  34. ^ Pruitt, Paul McWhorter, Jr. (March 13, 2007). "Maud McLure Kelly". Encyclopedia of Alabama. Retrieved February 29, 2016.
  35. ^ "Oral History Interview with Bert Nettles, July 13, 1974". docsouth.unc.edu. Retrieved May 27, 2014.
  36. ^ "Bill Baxley". NNDB Soylent Communications. Retrieved 15 December 2012.
  37. ^ "Jeff Sessions". USA Today. Retrieved 8 Feb 2017.
  38. ^ "Steadman S. Shealy". Shealy, Crum & Pike, P.C. Retrieved 15 December 2012.
  39. ^ "Robert Smith Vance". Biographical Directory of Federal Judges. Retrieved 15 December 2012.
  40. ^ "George Wallace". National Governors Association. Retrieved 15 December 2012.
  41. ^ "Foy Guin - Ballotpedia". Retrieved 2016-07-11.

External links[edit]