University of Maryland School of Law

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University of Maryland
Francis King Carey School of Law
University of Maryland School of Law logo.png
Parent school University of Maryland, Baltimore
Established 1816
School type Public
Dean Donald B. Tobin[1]
Location Baltimore, Maryland, USA
39°17′21″N 76°37′21″W / 39.2893°N 76.6224°W / 39.2893; -76.6224Coordinates: 39°17′21″N 76°37′21″W / 39.2893°N 76.6224°W / 39.2893; -76.6224
Enrollment 830[2]
USNWR ranking 39th (Tier 1)[3]
Website www.law.umaryland.edu
ABA profile ABA profile

The University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law (University of Maryland School of Law or Maryland Law) is the second-oldest law school in the United States.[4] The school was founded in 1816 as the Maryland Law Institute and began regular instruction in 1824. Because of its location, Maryland Law is part of the District of Columbia–Baltimore legal and business communities.[5]

In 2003, the law school moved into a new, state-of-the-art facility in downtown Baltimore near the Inner Harbor and Oriole Park at Camden Yards.[6] In 2011, the law school received a $30 million donation from the W.P. Carey Foundation, which is the largest gift in the school's history. In response, the law school changed its name to the University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law.[7]

Maryland Law has been ranked in the top tier of American law schools by U.S. News & World Report, maintaining its position in the rankings over the years, currently ranked 39th in the most recent 2013 edition.[3] The 2013 Rankings also gave Maryland top standing in the categories of Clinical Training (#5), Health Care Law (#3), Part-Time Program (#9), Environmental Law (#11) and Trial Advocacy (#8).[8] Additionally, Maryland ranks 22nd in the nation among public law schools.[9] The National Jurist recently named Maryland as a top-10 public interest law school in the nation.[10]

Maryland Law is fully accredited by the American Bar Association, is a member of the Association of American Law Schools, and has a chapter of the Order of the Coif.

Students, faculty, and alumni[edit]

UniversityofMarylandLawSchool 08 11.jpg

Approximately 830 students are enrolled at Maryland Law.[2] They are diverse in age, gender, academic background, prior employment, and race, with more than 30% identifying themselves as persons of color.[11] There are more than 40 student organizations,[12] four specialized legal centers,[13] and five law journals.[14] Many resources are available to new students, including upper-class peer advisers, skill-enhancement sessions, a legal writing center,[15] and one-on-one academic counseling.[16]

Academics & Statistics[edit]

Employment Outcomes[edit]

According to Maryland's 2013 ABA-required disclosures, 51.9% of the Class of 2013 obtained full-time, long-term, JD-required employment nine months after graduation.[17] Maryland's Law School Transparency under-employment score is 19.6%, indicating the percentage of the Class of 2013 unemployed, pursuing an additional degree, or working in a non-professional, short-term, or part-time job nine months after graduation.[18]

Costs[edit]

The total cost of attendance (indicating the cost of tuition, fees, and living expenses) at Maryland for the 2013-2014 academic year is $56,790.[19] The Law School Transparency estimated debt-financed cost of attendance for three years is $216,785.[20]

Curriculum[edit]

The rigorous core curriculum at Maryland Law includes Civil Procedure, Constitutional Law, Torts, Property, Contracts, and Criminal Law, as well as a two-semester course focusing on legal skills of analysis, research, writing, and oral argument.[21] These required courses form the basis for more specialized study through more than 150 elective courses, seminars, independent studies, simulations, clinics, and externships.

Specialty programs[edit]

Maryland Law is home to several specialty programs.[22] These programs enable students to explore areas of particular interest through experiential learning and a specialized curriculum.

Other specialty areas include the following:

  • Advocacy
  • Business Law
  • Intellectual Property Law
  • International and Comparative Law
  • Legislation and Public Policy
  • Women, Leadership & Equality

Students can focus their studies in other areas as well, including criminal law, dispute resolution, family law/child advocacy, general practice, jurisprudence/legal history, labor/employment/administrative law, property/real estate/decedent’s estates law, public interest law/community development, and tax law.

Dual-degree programs[edit]

The law school offers several dual-degree options:[23]

Business[edit]

Public Policy[edit]

  • J.D./Master of Public Policy from the University of Maryland School of Public Policy[24]
  • J.D./Master of Public Management
  • J.D./PhD in Public Policy through the University of Maryland Baltimore County School of Public Policy
  • J.D./Master of Community Planning through the University of Maryland Urban Studies and Planning Program

Health[edit]

Law and Society[edit]

The Maryland LL.M.[edit]

The Maryland LL.M. Program provides legal education for lawyers and law students seeking to develop expertise in a specific area of study. It is a program designed for individuals from the U.S. and abroad.[25]

Clinical Law Program[edit]

Through the Cardin Requirement, named after Maryland Law alumnus U.S. Senator Benjamin Cardin, each full-time day student gains hands-on legal experience by representing actual clients who would otherwise lack access to justice. Most students fulfill the Cardin Requirement through the Clinical Law Program,[26] which provides free legal services to Maryland’s poorest citizens each year.

More than 25 clinics[27] focus on a broad range of practice areas, including civil and criminal litigation, advice and counseling, and transactional work. Civil practice areas include environmental law, health, housing and community development, juvenile law and children, AIDS, and immigration. Criminal student attorneys often represent defendants in misdemeanor cases in Maryland’s district courts, as well as work in the School of Law's community justice efforts. In addition to in-house clinical work, students may gain experience in public and private nonprofit externships in the Baltimore-Washington region.

Initiatives[edit]

In addition to formal Programs and Centers, the Law School sponsors a variety of academic and public service initiatives. These initiatives enhance the educational and scholarly mission of the Law School and also serve the community.[28]

Leadership, Ethics and Democracy (LEAD) Initiative[edit]

In spring 2008, the Fetzer Institute made a three-year $1.6 million funding commitment to the School of Law to help it respond to these challenges and create a Leadership, Ethics and Democracy program (LEAD).[29]

Legislation, politics, and public policy[edit]

The University of Maryland School of Law offers students an educational experience in the areas of legislation, public policy and public interest practice.[30]

Linking Law & the Arts[edit]

University of Maryland School of Law, in conjunction with local arts organizations and as part of the "Linking Law and Arts", series use theater and art to help address complex legal, social and public policy issues.[31]

As part of their commitment to blending law and the arts, students and professors at the University of Maryland School of Law produced a short film in 2010 about the handling of war tribunals at Guantanamo Bay entitled "The Response" starring Aasif Mandvi.[32]

UMD Carey Law is also one of less than ten law schools in the United States to offer a course in Visual Legal Advocacy, teaching students how to and encouraging them to incorporate cinema into their advocacy work.[33]

Law School complex and library[edit]

The School of Law and the Thurgood Marshall Law Library occupy a complex that supports the school’s programs integrating classroom and experiential learning. The facility opened in 2002 and contains three courtrooms, including the Ceremonial Moot Courtroom, where state and federal trial and appellate courts regularly sit in session to hear cases.[34]

The Thurgood Marshall Law Library houses a collection of more than 495,000 volumes and equivalents accessible through the online catalog.[35] A staff of 23, including 11 librarians, provides customized reference and consulting services to faculty and students. In addition to LexisNexis and Westlaw, the library offers an legal and non-legal Web-based electronic databases.

Contrary to the commonly accepted history, Thurgood Marshall was not denied entry to the University of Maryland. In fact he never applied, as it was then common practice to deny all African Americans admission to the University of Maryland. Marshall went on to attend law school at Howard University.[citation needed]

Notable alumni[edit]

Governors[edit]

U.S. Senators[edit]

U.S. Congressmen[edit]

State Senators[edit]

State Delegates[edit]

Judges[edit]

Others[edit]

Publications[edit]

  • Maryland Law Review
  • Maryland Journal of International Law
  • Journal of Business & Technology Law
  • Journal of Health Care Law & Policy
  • Journal of Race, Religion, Gender and Class

References[edit]

  1. ^ Maryland Law | Donald B. Tobin
  2. ^ a b The University of Maryland School of Law
  3. ^ a b University of Maryland | Best Law School | US News
  4. ^ Law school in the United States#Oldest active law schools
  5. ^ http://www.martindale.com/xp/Martindale/Professional_Resources/Law_Schools/schl0446.xml
  6. ^ Maryland Law | Karen Rothenberg
  7. ^ of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law | Carey Foundation Donates $30M to UMDLaw
  8. ^ id.
  9. ^ Best Graduate Schools | Top Graduate Programs | US News Education
  10. ^ preLaw – Winter 2011
  11. ^ https://officialguide.lsac.org/Release/SchoolsABAData/SchoolPage/SchoolPage_PDFs/ABA_LawSchoolData/ABA5814.pdf
  12. ^ Maryland Law | Student Organizations
  13. ^ Maryland Law | Programs & Centers
  14. ^ Maryland Law | Journals
  15. ^ Maryland Law | Legal Writing Center
  16. ^ Maryland Law | Academic Achievement Program
  17. ^ "Employment Statistics". 
  18. ^ http://www.lstscorereports.com/schools/maryland/2013/.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  19. ^ (PDF) http://www.umaryland.edu/fin/documents/1314/Year1Budget_Law1314.pdf.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  20. ^ http://www.lstscorereports.com/schools/maryland/costs/2013/.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  21. ^ Maryland Law | Academics
  22. ^ Maryland Law | Programs & Centers
  23. ^ Maryland Law | Dual Degrees
  24. ^ "Public Policy, University of Maryland". University of Maryland School of Public Policy. Retrieved September 28, 2011.  |first1= missing |last1= in Authors list (help)
  25. ^ Maryland Law | The Maryland LL.M
  26. ^ Maryland Law | Clinical Law
  27. ^ Maryland Law | Course Catalog Search
  28. ^ Maryland Law | Other Initiatives
  29. ^ Maryland Law | LEAD : Leadership, Ethics, and Democracy
  30. ^ Maryland Law | Legislation, Politics, and Public Policy
  31. ^ Maryland Law | Linking Law & the Arts
  32. ^ [1]
  33. ^ "UM Carey Law | Abstracts & Professional Biographies". www.law.umaryland.edu. Retrieved 2015-06-09. 
  34. ^ http://www.law.umaryland.edu/dept/it/notebook_requirement.asp
  35. ^ Thurgood Marshall Law Library | University of Maryland School of Law
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  67. ^ "JOHN G. TRUESCHLERRepublican, District 42, Baltimore County". Maryland State Archives. Retrieved January 9, 2013. 
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External links[edit]