University of Missouri Press

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University of Missouri Press
Parent companyUniversity of Missouri
Founded1958
FounderWilliam Peden
Country of originUnited States
Headquarters locationColumbia, Missouri
DistributionChicago Distribution Center (US)[1]
Scholarly Book Services (Canada)
East-West Export Books (Asia, the Pacific)
The Eurospan Group (Europe)[2]
Publication typesBooks
Official websitepress.umsystem.edu

The University of Missouri Press is a university press operated by the University of Missouri in Columbia, Missouri and London, England; it was founded in 1958 primarily through the efforts of English professor William Peden.[3] Many publications are by, for, and about Missourians. The press also emphasizes the areas of American and world history; military history; intellectual history; biography; journalism; African American studies; women's studies; American, British, and Latin American literary criticism; political science; regional studies; and creative nonfiction. The press has published 2,000 books since its founding and currently publishes about 30 mostly academic books a year.

Notable publications[edit]

Among its notable publications were:

Series[edit]

  • The American Military Experience Series,[4] edited by John C. McManus.
  • The Collected Works of Langston Hughes[5]
  • The Collected Works of Eric Voegelin[6]
  • The Eric Voegelin Institute Series in Political Philosophy[7]
  • The Give 'Em Hell Harry Series,[8] edited by Robert H. Ferrell.
  • The Mark Twain and His Circle Series,[9] edited by Tom Quirk.
  • The Missouri Biography Series,[10] edited by William E. Foley.
  • The Missouri Heritage Readers Series,[11] edited by Rebecca B. Schroeder.
  • The Shades of Blue and Gray Series,[12] edited by Herman Hattaway, Jon Wakelyn, and Clayton E. Jewett.
  • The Sports and American Culture Series,[13] edited by Roger Launius.
  • The Southern Women Series,[14] edited by Theda Perdue, Betty Brandon, and Virginia Bernhard.
  • The Paul Anthony Brick Lectures,[15] which include works by John Hope Franklin and Sissela Bok.

Reorganization[edit]

The university proposed in spring 2012 to close the press and terminate its ten employees in order to end the university's subsidy to the press, estimated by the university administration as $400,000 per year and by outside critics of the closure decision as under $250,000 a year.[16] The decision was reversed in August 2012 after public outcry.[17] As part of the reorganization the press now reports up to the main Columbia campus rather than the University of Missouri System.[18] A new director was hired in 2013.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Publishers served by the Chicago Distribution Center". University of Chicago Press. Retrieved September 12, 2017.
  2. ^ "Orders". Missouri Press. Retrieved December 3, 2017.
  3. ^ "History and Mission". University of Missouri Press. Retrieved May 26, 2012.
  4. ^ "The American Military Experience Series". University of Missouri Press. Retrieved September 8, 2021.
  5. ^ "The Collected Works of Langston Hughes". University of Missouri Press. Retrieved September 8, 2021.
  6. ^ "The Collected Works of Eric Voegelin". University of Missouri Press. Retrieved September 8, 2021.
  7. ^ "The Eric Voegelin Institute Series in Political Philosophy". University of Missouri Press. Retrieved September 8, 2021.
  8. ^ "The Give 'Em Hell Harry Series". University of Missouri Press. Retrieved September 9, 2021.
  9. ^ "The Mark Twain and His Circle Series". University of Missouri Press. Retrieved September 9, 2021.
  10. ^ "The Missouri Biography Series". University of Missouri Press. Retrieved September 9, 2021.
  11. ^ "The Missouri Heritage Readers Series". University of Missouri Press. Retrieved September 9, 2021.
  12. ^ "The Shades of Blue and Gray Series". University of Missouri Press. Retrieved September 9, 2021.
  13. ^ "The Sports and American Culture Series". University of Missouri Press. Retrieved September 9, 2021.
  14. ^ "The Southern Women Series". University of Missouri Press. Retrieved September 9, 2021.
  15. ^ "The Paul Anthony Brick Lectures". University of Missouri Press. Retrieved September 9, 2021.
  16. ^ William Least Heat-Moon, "University Press closure casts bad light on UM System," Columbia Daily Tribune, July 15, 2012.
  17. ^ Jennifer Howard, "After Outcry Over Closure, U. of Missouri Press Is Back to Printing Books," Chronicle of Higher Education, Aug. 28, 2012
  18. ^ "University of Missouri Press emerges from the brink". kansascity.com. Retrieved April 19, 2018.

External links[edit]