University of Texas Rio Grande Valley

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The University of Texas Rio Grande Valley
University of Texas Rio Grande Valley wordmark.png
Motto Latin: Disciplina Praesidium Civitatis
Motto in English
Cultivated mind is the guardian genius of democracy.[1]
Established 1927 (as Edinburg College)
June 14, 2013
Type Public State University
President Guy Bailey
Provost Havidan Rodriguez
Academic staff
797 (as of June 19, 2015) [2]
Administrative staff
1,338 (as of June 19, 2015) [2]
Location Brownsville, Edinburg, Harlingen, McAllen, Rio Grande City, South Padre Island, Texas, U.S.
Colors Orange, Green, & Blue
              
Athletics NCAA Division IWAC
Nickname Vaqueros
Affiliations UT System
Website www.utrgv.edu

The University of Texas Rio Grande Valley (UTRGV) is a new university that will be formed in 2015 from the consolidation of the University of Texas at Brownsville (UTB) and University of Texas–Pan American (UTPA). The university will include a new medical school.[3]

History[edit]

On December 6, 2012, the University of Texas Board of Regents approved a proposal to abolish The University of Texas Pan American and The University of Texas at Brownsville, and create the University of Texas Rio Grande Valley in their place. The new institution was planned to include a medical school.[4]

On June 14, 2013, Texas Governor Rick Perry signed SB 24[5] into law, approving the creation of the new university.

On December 12, 2013, the UT Board of Regents voted to name the new institution the University of Texas Rio Grande Valley (UTRGV).

On February 14, 2014, UTRGV announced Francisco Fernandez as the founding dean of the UTRGV School of Medicine[6]

On April 28, 2014, Dr. Guy Bailey became the sole finalist for the university president position.[7]

On October 13, 2014, UTRGV announced the establishment of the South Texas Diabetes & Obesity Institute.[8]

On November 6, 2014, The University of Texas Board of Regents approved the "Vaqueros" as the athletic nickname for University of Texas Rio Grande Valley. They also approved the official colors of blue, green, and orange.[9]

On February 12, 2015, The University of Texas Board of Regents approved the proposed colors, along with athletic branding and marks. [10]

Academics[edit]

Colleges and schools[edit]

Eleven colleges and schools will form the academic foundation for UTRGV, including:[11]

UTRGV College/School founding
College/School
Year founded

College of Medicine
2015
College of Medicine and Health Affairs*
2016
College of Health Affairs
2015
College of Sciences
2015
College of Liberal Arts
2015
College of Fine Arts
2015
College of Engineering and Computer Science
2015
College of Business and Entrepreneurship
2015
College of Education and P-16 Integration
2015
Honors College
2015
Graduate College
2015
University College
2015
  • When the UTRGV School of Medicine is fully accredited, a College of Medicine and Health Affairs will be formed that will include Nursing, Social Work, and Allied Health. Until that time, UTRGV will operate a College of Medicine and College of Health Affairs on an interim basis.[11]

Proposed expansions[edit]

Legislation to establish a law school in UTRGV was introduced by representative Eddie Lucio III in November 2014.[12]

Athletics[edit]

Main article: UTRGV Vaqueros
UTRGV Vaqueros logo

Mascot controversy[edit]

The choice of a new university mascot was contentious.[13] Many UTPA supporters argued for keeping the UTPA mascot, Bucky the Bronc, while UTB supporters argued strongly for a new mascot. Several local city councils passed resolutions in support of one option or the other.[13] President Guy Bailey recommended a new mascot, Vaqueros, to the University of Texas System Board of Regents on November 5, 2014.[14] The suggestion for Vaquero was partly inspired by UTPA student art projects, where the Vaquero and Toro were the most popular projects.[15]

Bailey also recommended school’s colors be UT system orange, green (formerly the secondary color of UTPA), and blue (formerly the secondary color of UTB).[14]

The announcement to the decision generated a swift and mainly negative reaction on social media, with accusations the name was culturally insensitive, racist, and sexist.[16][17] Nevertheless, the University of Texas Board of Regents approved the recommendation the following day.[18] Bailey considered the decision "final" following the approval by the board of regents.[19] About 500 students protested against the Vaquero mascot on the UTPA campus on 13 November 2014.[20] Following the protests, the UT System issued a press release supporting the "Vaquero" decision. [21]

At the height of the controversy in November 2014, Texas legislator Terry Canales suggested he was considering filing a bill requiring UTRGV to abandon the Vaquero mascot.[19] Canales submitted HB901 in January 2015.[22] If passed, the legislation would require UTRGV to hold a student election for the athletics nickname, with "Broncs" and "Ocelots" on the ballot.

The mascot design was revealed in February 2015.[23] The logo features an orange faced rider in green on a navy blue and green horse. The logo features a map of Texas in the negative space between the legs of the horse.[24][10]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Seal of the University". University of Texas System. Retrieved 1 December 2014. 
  2. ^ a b "Faculty & Staff". The University of Texas Rio Grande Valley. Retrieved 29 June 2015. 
  3. ^ LaCoste-Caputo, Jenny; Adler, Karen (December 12, 2013). "Board of Regents votes to name new UT in South Texas The University of Texas Rio Grande Valley" (Press release). Austin, Texas: The University of Texas System Office of Public Affairs. Retrieved December 12, 2013. 
  4. ^ Kreighbaum, Andrew (6 December 2012). "UT regents approve merging RGV universities, will create medical school". The Monitor (McAllen, Texas). Retrieved 7 December 2012. 
  5. ^ SB 24
  6. ^ LaCoste-Caputo, Jenny; Adler, Karen (November 6, 2014). "Psychiatrist-neuroscientist to be founding dean of UT Rio Grande Valley School of Medicine" (Press release). Austin, Texas: The University of Texas System Office of Public Affairs. Retrieved 15 November 2014. 
  7. ^ Vertuno, Jim (April 28, 2014). "Guy Bailey named sole finalist for president of University of Texas Rio Grande Valley". Lubbock Avalanche-Journal. Associated Press. Retrieved April 29, 2014. 
  8. ^ LaCoste-Caputo, Jenny; Adler, Karen (November 6, 2014). "UTRGV recruits 22-person research team to establish South Texas Diabetes & Obesity Institute" (Press release). Brownsville, Texas: The University of Texas System Office of Public Affairs. Retrieved 15 November 2014. 
  9. ^ LaCoste-Caputo, Jenny; Adler, Karen (November 6, 2014). "UT System Board of Regents approves “Vaqueros” as athletic nickname for new university" (Press release). El Paso, Texas: The University of Texas System Office of Public Affairs. Retrieved 15 November 2014. 
  10. ^ a b "University of Texas System selects UTRGV athletic logo". KGBT-TV (Harlingen, Texas). February 12, 2015. Retrieved 21 February 2015. 
  11. ^ a b "Creating America's Next Great Major University". The University of Texas Rio Grande Valley. Retrieved November 15, 2014. 
  12. ^ De Leon, Jose (November 10, 2014). "UT-RGV law school, drug tests, texting bans on 1st day of bill filing". The Monitor (McAllen, Texas). Associated Press. Retrieved November 13, 2014. 
  13. ^ a b Solomon, Dan (September 18, 2014). "The Debate Over What The Mascot For The New UT-RGV Campus Is Getting Heated, Y'all". Texas Monthly (Austin, Texas). Retrieved October 3, 2014. 
  14. ^ a b Brito, Victoria (November 5, 2014). "UT-RGV mascot recommended to be the Vaquero". The Monitor (McAllen, Texas). Retrieved November 5, 2014. 
  15. ^ Perez-Hernandez, Danya (November 7, 2014). "For Vaquero sculptor, UT-RGV controversy not a factor in designing new mascot". The Monitor (McAllen, Texas). Retrieved November 9, 2014. 
  16. ^ Nelsen, Aaron (November 6, 2014). "Critics: Vaquero mascot is 'culturally insensitive'". San Antonio Express-News (San Antonio, Texas). Retrieved November 6, 2014. 
  17. ^ Gonzalez, Susan (November 6, 2014). "New university mascot, colors fiercely debated". The Pan American (Edinburg, Texas: UTPA - Student Publications). Retrieved November 6, 2014. 
  18. ^ "UT System tweet". Twitter. November 6, 2014. Retrieved November 6, 2014. 
  19. ^ a b Chapa, Sergio (November 7, 2014). "UTRGV President Guy Bailey fires back amid "Vaqueros" controversy". KGBT-TV (Harlingen, Texas). Retrieved November 8, 2014. 
  20. ^ Perez-Hernandez, Danya (November 10, 2014). "Fight against vaquero not over for UTPA students". The Monitor (McAllen, Texas). Retrieved November 13, 2014. 
  21. ^ LaCoste-Caputo, Jenny; Adler, Karen (November 14, 2014). "Statement from Chairman Paul Foster, Chancellor Francisco Cigarroa and Executive Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs Pedro Reyes" (Press release). The University of Texas System Office of Public Affairs. Retrieved November 20, 2014. 
  22. ^ Perez-Hernandez, Danya (January 23, 2015). "Bill seeks election for UT-RGV nickname". The Monitor (McAllen, Texas). Retrieved January 26, 2015. 
  23. ^ Luca, Greg (February 6, 2015). "UT-RGV releases official Vaqueros logo design". The Monitor (McAllen, Texas). Retrieved February 6, 2015. 
  24. ^ "I see you". Twitter. February 6, 2015. Retrieved February 6, 2015. 

External links[edit]