Unlingen

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Unlingen
Coat of arms of Unlingen
Coat of arms
Unlingen   is located in Germany
Unlingen
Unlingen
Coordinates: 48°10′3″N 9°31′16″E / 48.16750°N 9.52111°E / 48.16750; 9.52111Coordinates: 48°10′3″N 9°31′16″E / 48.16750°N 9.52111°E / 48.16750; 9.52111
Country Germany
State Baden-Württemberg
Admin. region Tübingen
District Biberach
Government
 • Mayor Richard Mück
Area
 • Total 26.87 km2 (10.37 sq mi)
Elevation 535 m (1,755 ft)
Population (2015-12-31)[1]
 • Total 2,409
 • Density 90/km2 (230/sq mi)
Time zone CET/CEST (UTC+1/+2)
Postal codes 88527
Dialling codes 07371
Vehicle registration BC
Website www.unlingen.de

Unlingen is a town in the district of Biberach in Baden-Württemberg in Germany.

Geography[edit]

Location[edit]

Unlingen lies in southwestern Germany, between the Upper Swabian mountain known as the Bussen and the Danube River.

Districts within Unlingen[edit]

Unlingen contains the districts of Dietelhofen, Göffingen, Möhringen and Uigendorf.

Political History[edit]

The first recorded mention of Unlingen occurred in 1163. In 1291 Unlingen fell to the House of Habsburg, and eventually became a part of Further Austria. At the end of the 14th century, the Steward of Waldburg held large portions of the town. In 1525, 2,000 farmers gathered in Unlingen as it became one of the starting points of the German Peasants' War. During the Thirty Years' War, Unlingen was destroyed by both Imperial and Swedish troops. In 1635, plague killed a large part of the population.

In 1806, during the Napoleonic Wars, Unlingen became a part of the Kingdom of Württemberg and was assigned to the jurisdiction of Riedlingen. With the district reform of 1938, the town became part of the county of Saulgau, then in 1973 was added to the district of Biberach.

Religious History[edit]

By 1269 a church stood in Unlingen. In 1414 the Franciscan monastery "Maria Heimsuchung" was founded.

Notable Residents[edit]

German striker Mario Gomez grew up in Unlingen.

References[edit]