Upshur County, Texas

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Upshur County
Upshur County Courthouse
Upshur County Courthouse
Map of Texas highlighting Upshur County
Location within the U.S. state of Texas
Map of the United States highlighting Texas
Texas's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 32°44′N 94°56′W / 32.73°N 94.94°W / 32.73; -94.94
Country United States
State Texas
Founded1846
Named forAbel P. Upshur
SeatGilmer
Largest cityGladewater
Area
 • Total593 sq mi (1,540 km2)
 • Land583 sq mi (1,510 km2)
 • Water9.7 sq mi (25 km2)  1.6%
Population
 (2020)
 • Total40,892
 • Estimate 
(2019)
41,753
 • Density69/sq mi (27/km2)
Time zoneUTC−6 (Central)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−5 (CDT)
Congressional districts1st, 4th
Websitewww.countyofupshur.com

Upshur County is a county located in the eastern part of the U.S. state of Texas. As of the 2020 census, the population was 40,892.[1] The county seat is Gilmer.[2] The county is named for Abel P. Upshur, who was U.S. Secretary of State during President John Tyler's administration.

Upshur County is part of the Longview, Texas Metropolitan Statistical Area, as well as the Longview–Marshall, TX Combined Statistical Area.

History[edit]

Humans have inhabited what is now Upshur County since at least 10,000 years ago. The Caddoan people lived in this area, but were driven out about 1750, probably due to losses from new infectious diseases carried chronically by Europeans.

Later, some Cherokee migrated to the area from their territories in the Southeast – Georgia and Alabama. The Cherokee were driven out of here by European-American settlers in 1839, after having been removed from the Southeast.[3]

The first European-American settler in Upshur County was probably Isaac Moody, who settled there in 1836.[3] Upshur County was named for Abel Parker Upshur, Secretary of State under John Tyler.[3]

Upshur County has the distinction of being the county that has the largest settlement in Texas organized by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. In 1904, the Latter-day Saint Southwestern States Mission organized a colony at Kelsey, Texas.[4]

On March 21, 2022 Upshur County was hit by an EF-2 tornado with winds reported as high as 135 mph. Extensive damage was reported but no fatalities.[5] This tornado was a part of the tornado outbreak of March 21-23, 2022.

Geography[edit]

Upshur County Courthouse

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 593 square miles (1,540 km2), of which 583 square miles (1,510 km2) are land and 9.7 square miles (25 km2) (1.6%) are covered by water.[6]

Major highways[edit]

Adjacent counties[edit]

Communities[edit]

Cities[edit]

Town[edit]

Unincorporated communities[edit]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
18503,394
186010,645213.6%
187012,03913.1%
188010,266−14.7%
189012,69523.7%
190016,26628.1%
191019,96022.7%
192022,47212.6%
193022,297−0.8%
194026,17817.4%
195020,822−20.5%
196019,793−4.9%
197020,9766.0%
198028,59536.3%
199031,3709.7%
200035,29112.5%
201039,30911.4%
202040,8924.0%
U.S. Decennial Census[7]
1850–2010[8] 2010[9] 2020[10]
Demographic Profile of Upshur County, Texas
(NH = Non-Hispanic)
Race / Ethnicity Pop 2010[9] Pop 2020[10] % 2010 % 2020
White alone (NH) 32,257 31,287 82.06% 76.51%
Black or African American alone (NH) 3,388 2,908 8.62% 7.11%
Native American or Alaska Native alone (NH) 206 261 0.52% 0.64%
Asian alone (NH) 146 177 0.37% 0.43%
Pacific Islander alone (NH) 3 9 0.01% 0.02%
Some Other Race alone (NH) 35 150 0.09% 0.37%
Mixed Race/Multi-Racial (NH) 661 2,114 1.68% 5.17%
Hispanic or Latino (any race) 2,613 3,986 6.65% 9.75%
Total 39,309 40,892 100.00% 100.00%

Note: the US Census treats Hispanic/Latino as an ethnic category. This table excludes Latinos from the racial categories and assigns them to a separate category. Hispanics/Latinos can be of any race.

As of the 2020 census, there were 40,892 people in the county.[10] As of the census of 2000, 35,291 people, 13,290 households, and 10,033 families resided in the county.[11] The population density was 60 people per square mile (23/km2). The 14,930 housing units averaged 25 per square mile (10/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 85.70% White, 10.15% African American, 0.63% Native American, 0.18% Asian, 0.06% Pacific Islander, 2.10% from other races, and 1.17% from two or more races. About 3.95% of the population was Hispanic or Latino of any race.

Of the 13,290 households, 33.50% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 60.70% were married couples living together, 11.00% had a female householder with no husband present, and 24.50% were not families. About 21.80% of all households were made up of individuals, and 10.30% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.62 and the average family size was 3.05.

In the county, the population was distributed as 27.00% under the age of 18, 8.00% from 18 to 24, 26.60% from 25 to 44, 24.10% from 45 to 64, and 14.30% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females, there were 95.50 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.10 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $33,347, and for a family was $38,857. Males had a median income of $31,216 versus $20,528 for females. The per capita income for the county was $16,358. 14.90% of the population and 12.30% of families were below the poverty line. Out of the total population, 18.60% of those under the age of 18 and 14.00% of those 65 and older were living below the poverty line.

Politics[edit]

Upshur County is represented in the Texas Senate by Republican Bryan Hughes, from Mineola.

Upshur County is represented in the Texas House of Representatives by Republican Jay Dean, from Longview.

Upshur County, along with Marion County, is the 115th Judicial District of Texas. The presiding judge of the 115th Judicial District is Judge Dean Fowler. Prior to serving as judge of the 115th Judicial District, Fowler served for sixteen years as the Upshur County Judge, beginning January 1, 2003 until December 31, 2018.

Per the Texas Constitution of 1876, the chief administrative body of Upshur County is the five-member Upshur County Commissioners Court. The County Judge is elected separately. The county road maintenance is administrated by the County Road Administrator. This system was adopted in Upshur County in November 2002 and reaffirmed by two subsequent elections. The commissioners court oversees all of the Upshur County government's operations.

Upshur County Judge Todd Tefteller began his first term on January 1, 2019. He presides over the Upshur County Misdemeanor Criminal Docket, Probate, Civil, and Commissioners Courts. Commissioner Gene Dolle is in his first term and has served Precinct One since January 1, 2021. Commissioner Dustin Nicholson began his first term as Commissioner of Precinct Two on January 1, 2019. Commissioner Michael Ashley is in his first term and has served Precinct Three since January 1, 2021. Commissioner Jay Miller began his first term as Commissioner of Precinct Four on January 1, 2019.

United States presidential election results for Upshur County, Texas[12]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 15,809 83.56% 2,877 15.21% 233 1.23%
2016 13,209 82.49% 2,380 14.86% 424 2.65%
2012 12,015 79.37% 2,971 19.63% 152 1.00%
2008 11,222 74.00% 3,790 24.99% 152 1.00%
2004 10,232 70.44% 4,225 29.09% 69 0.48%
2000 8,448 65.96% 4,180 32.64% 180 1.41%
1996 5,174 45.71% 5,032 44.45% 1,114 9.84%
1992 4,511 36.95% 4,776 39.12% 2,921 23.93%
1988 5,991 53.18% 5,242 46.53% 32 0.28%
1984 7,325 61.16% 4,614 38.53% 37 0.31%
1980 4,836 49.09% 4,894 49.68% 122 1.24%
1976 3,272 39.85% 4,902 59.70% 37 0.45%
1972 4,736 71.50% 1,879 28.37% 9 0.14%
1968 1,519 22.06% 2,480 36.02% 2,886 41.92%
1964 2,222 35.48% 4,027 64.31% 13 0.21%
1960 2,262 40.73% 3,248 58.48% 44 0.79%
1956 2,737 57.45% 1,995 41.88% 32 0.67%
1952 2,391 43.98% 3,040 55.91% 6 0.11%
1948 555 17.54% 2,118 66.92% 492 15.55%
1944 446 13.24% 2,369 70.32% 554 16.44%
1940 518 12.96% 3,480 87.04% 0 0.00%
1936 321 12.50% 2,243 87.38% 3 0.12%
1932 129 4.24% 2,900 95.39% 11 0.36%
1928 649 29.37% 1,553 70.27% 8 0.36%
1924 258 8.86% 2,611 89.69% 42 1.44%
1920 616 26.44% 1,222 52.45% 492 21.12%
1916 198 11.82% 1,346 80.36% 131 7.82%
1912 168 13.90% 896 74.11% 145 11.99%


Education[edit]

These school districts serve Upshur County:

Media[edit]

The Main Newspaper for Upshur County is the Gilmer Mirror. The Gladewater Mirror has been published since 1949, first, as a daily newspaper[13] and then became a weekly newspaper.[14]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Upshur County, Texas". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 30, 2022.
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  3. ^ a b c UPSHUR COUNTY | The Handbook of Texas Online| Texas State Historical Association (TSHA)
  4. ^ Jenson, Andrew. Encyclopedic History of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. (Salt Lake City: Deseret News Press, 1941) p. 129
  5. ^ reports, From staff. "NWS: Upshur County tornado traveled 40-mile path of destruction, was one of 6 in East Texas". Longview News-Journal. Retrieved May 4, 2022.
  6. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved May 11, 2015.
  7. ^ "Census of Population and Housing from 1790–2000". US Census Bureau. Retrieved January 24, 2022.
  8. ^ "Texas Almanac: Population History of Counties from 1850–2010" (PDF). Texas Almanac. Retrieved May 11, 2015.
  9. ^ a b "P2 HISPANIC OR LATINO, AND NOT HISPANIC OR LATINO BY RACE – 2010: DEC Redistricting Data (PL 94-171) – Upshur County, Texas". United States Census Bureau.
  10. ^ a b c "P2 HISPANIC OR LATINO, AND NOT HISPANIC OR LATINO BY RACE – 2020: DEC Redistricting Data (PL 94-171) – Upshur County, Texas". United States Census Bureau.
  11. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 14, 2011.
  12. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved February 21, 2021.
  13. ^ "Gladewater Mirror @ Gladewater". Texas Press Association. Retrieved December 19, 2019.
  14. ^ "About The Gladewater mirror. (Gladewater, Tex.) 1968-current". United States Library of Congress. Retrieved December 20, 2019.

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 32°44′N 94°56′W / 32.73°N 94.94°W / 32.73; -94.94