User:Sonic Mew/The Simpsons Season Two

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

This is an example for the discussion about television episodes. I am personally neutral on the matter, but examples help, so this is what a merge of Season Two of The Simpsons would look like. (It would probably also include an introduction, including details on the DVD Box set.)

It is 76 kilobytes long.


Contents

Bart Gets an F[edit]

"Bart Gets an F"
The Simpsons episode
Episode no. 14
Directed by David Silverman
Written by David M. Stern
Production code 7F03
Original air date October 11, 1990
Chalkboard gag "I will not teach others to fly"
Couch gag The couch falls through the floor as Homer says "D'oh!"
Guest appearance(s)

None

Seasons

"Bart Gets an F" is the first episode of The Simpsons' second season, airing on October 11, 1990.

Synopsis[edit]

{{spoiler}}

When Bart presents his book report at school on Treasure Island, Bart does a very vague report. Mrs. Krabappel only wonders if Bart ever read it. She warns Bart that his grades have gotten steadily worse since the beginning of the term, and warns Bart of an exam on Colonial America tomorrow, but does not pay attention to a word she says. Bart tries to study, but he frequently procrastinates in his time intended for studying. He studies for the test.

However, when he wakes up the next day, he is worried he will flunk. He looks to Sherri and Terri for help, and they offer him false answers in hopes that he can fail the test. As he does the test, he collapses and sees the nurse, who suggests that Bart stay home because she believes he has amoria phlebitis. At home, Bart procrastinates again and does the test by copying Milhouse's answers, with Mrs. Krabappel giving him a bad mark. Homer and Marge have an interview with Mrs. Krabappel and the school's psychiatrist, Dr. J. Loren Pryor, who sees Bart as an underachiever and suggests that Bart be held back against his wishes, insisting that he really is dumb and that "as God is my witness, I can pass the fourth grade."

With Bart worried he might be held back, he looks to Martin for help. He helps Bart study, and Bart reciprocates by showing how to be more popular which encourages him to take on some of Bart's bad attitudes. Bart reminds a newly-procrastinating Martin about the test, but he ignores it, and now Bart must study on his own. He prays to God that a snowstorm will happen so he can stay home and avoid doing the test the next day. It snows, and schools are closed, and Bart takes Lisa's advice to stay home and study, on a day where everyone else is out in the snow, having fun. Bart actually concentrates while he is studying, and as he does the retest, Mrs. Krabappel marks his test and his mark is 59%, making it another "F" grade test for him. Extremely upset at this failure after his honest effort, Bart wails that now he knows how George Washington felt when he surrendered Fort Necessity to the French in 1754, and the stunned Mrs. Krabappel gives Bart an extra point, pushing his grade up to a "D-", and congratulating him for demonstrating applied knowledge.

Trivia[edit]

  • When the FOX network decided to show The Simpsons on Thursday at 8:00 P.M. EST against NBC's highly-rated The Cosby Show, many were expecting this to be a war for ratings. Surprisingly, this episode of The Simpsons drew higher ratings in its first airing than The Cosby Show, and it would lead to The Cosby Show's eventual cancellation in 1992.
  • This is Mayor Quimby's first appearance.
  • In 1999, Entertainment Weekly named this one of 100 moments in TV history of the 20th century.

Quotes[edit]

  • Bart: Look at my eyes! See the sincerity? See the conviction? See the fear? As God is my witness, I can pass the fourth grade!
    Homer: And if you don't, at least you'll be bigger than the other kids.
  • Bart: Good morning, girls.
    Sherri and Terri: Good morning, Bart.
    Bart: Say, who's up for a little cram session? I'll go first. What was the name of the Pilgrims' boat?
    Sherri: The Spirit of St. Louis.
    Bart: And where'd they land?
    Terri: Sunny Acapulco.
    Bart: And why'd they leave England?
    Sherri: Giant rats.
    Bart: Cool! History's coming alive!
  • Homer: We're proud of you, boy!
    Bart: Thanks, Dad. But part of this "D-" belongs to God.

External links[edit]

Simpson and Delilah[edit]

"Simpson and Delilah"
The Simpsons episode
Episode no. 15
Directed by Rich Moore
Written by Jon Vitti
Production code 7F02
Original air date October 18, 1990
Chalkboard gag "Tar is not a plaything"
Couch gag The family does a little dance
Guest appearance(s)
Seasons

"Simpson and Delilah" is the second episode of The Simpsons' second season, airing on October 18, 1990.

Synopsis[edit]

{{spoiler}}

Homer Simpson realizes he does not have much hair and he wants a hair cure drug, Dimoxinil, so badly after seeing a commercial on TV, calling it a "miracle breakthrough". He visits a store which sells Dimoxinil, but it costs $1000, and Homer cannot afford that. At work, Lenny suggests Homer pay for Dimoxinil through the company medical insurance plan. Homer arranges to get the Dimoxinil through a shady deal in an alley with the doctor who offered the Dimoxinil for $1000. He applies the drug, and the next day, Homer wakes up with hair. At work, Mr. Burns surveys the security monitors to find a new person to promote to an executive promotion. He sees Homer with hair and chooses Homer for the job.

As he is about to become an executive, Homer tries to look for a good secretary, but all the applicants fail until Homer finds a man, Karl, who applies. Homer eventually picks Karl, and they go shopping for a suit. At the power plant's board meeting, Homer finds a good suggestion to improve the low productivity and decrease the record high worker accident rate: Give people more tartar sauce when they have fishsticks every Tuesday. Mr. Burns approves Homer's proposal, and accidents have, according to Smithers, decreased by the number of accidents that Homer himself is known to have caused last month. With Burns impressed with Homer's efforts, he gives him the key to the executive washroom.

Ironically, as Homer is given the key, Smithers exposes Homer's phony medical insurance form, and sees Homer's reason he got Dimoxinil was to keep his brain from freezing. Burns asks Homer to give a speech to the executives, and at the same time it happens, Smithers discovers that Homer has bilked the power plant's insurance plan out of $1000. Smithers fires Homer on the spot, but Karl admits he did it, and he is fired, and forgives Homer. When he gets home, Bart uses Homer's Dimoxinil bottle in order to have a beard. Bart accidentally spills Homer's bottle, and he is mad. The next day, Homer arrives at the meeting, doing his speech with Karl's help, with Karl actually coming to say goodbye to the girls in the typing pool. Homer presents his speech, but the people who see it reject him. He is asked to come to Mr. Burns' office, and Burns mentions he was happier on his days with hair. In the end, Homer gets his regular job back, and Marge consoles him.

Trivia[edit]

  • Dimoxinil is a spoof on a similar product, Minoxidil, which was originally used for high blood pressure, and later became Rogaine.
  • The title comes from the Bible story "Samson and Delilah".

Quotes[edit]

  • Sign at The Royal Majesty Clothing For the Obese or Gangly Gentlemen, the store where Homer buys his suits: YOU RIP IT, YOU BUY IT.
  • Homer: (strangling Bart) BOY! MUST! DIE!
    Bart: I love you, Dad!
    Homer: D'oh! (stops strangling) Dirty trick. Okay, I'm not going to kill you, but I'm going to tell you three things that are gonna haunt you for the rest of your days. You've ruined your father, you've crippled your family, and baldness is hereditary!

Mr. Burns, after hearing about how much Homer defrauded the company for his Dimoxomil: BLAST HIS HIDE TO HADES!!

External links[edit]

Treehouse of Horror[edit]

"Treehouse of Horror"
The Simpsons episode
Episode no. 16
Directed by Wesley Archer, Rich Moore and David Silverman
Written by John Swartzwelder, Jay Kogen, Wallace Wolodarsky, Sam Simon and Edgar Allan Poe
Production code 7F04
Original air date October 25, 1990
Chalkboard gag None
Couch gag None
Guest appearance(s)

James Earl Jones as the moving man, Serak the Preparer and the narrator

Seasons

"Treehouse of Horror", also referred to as "The Simpsons Halloween Special" was the first halloween-themed episode of The Simpsons. It became a yearly tradition afterwards. The Treehouse of Horror episodes do not have to (and as a rule, do not) obey the rest of the series' rules of realism, and the stories do not affect the Simpsons universe as established by the other episodes.

Synopsis[edit]

Opening Segment[edit]

Marge warns people about how bad Halloween is, and warns people not to watch the show.

Set-up[edit]

Homer eavesdrops as Bart and Lisa tell three scary stories in the treehouse. {{spoiler}}

Bad Dream House[edit]

Bart tells this story, in which the Simpsons move into a mansion which appears to be a haunted house. The house tells them to leave repeatedly, but the Simpsons do not listen. Lisa believes there is an evil presence in the house. At night, the house tells Homer, Marge, Bart, Lisa, and Maggie to kill each other. Lisa discovers that the house was built on an ancient Indian burial ground. After this, Marge asks if there is some way they can live together with the house in peace. Unable to bear the thought of life with the Simpsons, the house destroys itself.

Hungry are the Damned[edit]

Bart tells this story as well. The Simpsons are grilling outside when they are abducted by Kang and Kodos. The family is treated very well and are fed many sumptuous meals; the aliens tell them that this is to prepare them for a magnificent feast on their behalf on Rigel 4. Lisa grows suspicious of the aliens' generous behavior and finds what appears to be a cookbook specifying how to prepare humans as food. The book is quite dusty, however, and eventually proves to be a guidebook on how to treat humans well. Kang and Kodos are appalled at Lisa's suspicion and her family's willingness to assume the worst, and return the Simpsons to Earth.

The Raven[edit]

Lisa reads The Raven by Edgar Allan Poe. In this parody, Bart is the raven, Homer is the poem's lead character, Lisa and Maggie are angels, and Marge appears as Lenore; James Earl Jones narrates. Apart from a brief interruption from Bart and an interjection from Homer, the poem is read (and acted out) verbatim.

At the end of the episode, Bart and Lisa go to bed peacefully. However, Homer is so frightened by The Raven that he is afraid to turn out the bedroom light.

Trivia[edit]

  • This is the only Treehouse of Horror episode to actually be in the treehouse.
  • The tombstones at the beginning (which are panned past in pairs) read from first to last, and left to right, in all caps:
    Ezekiel Simpson; Ishmael Simpson; Cornelius V. Simpson; Garfield; The Grateful Dead; Casper, the friendly boy; Elvis; Your name here (barely legible); Paul McCartney (see Paul is Dead rumor); and disco.
  • Edgar Allan Poe is credited as a writer for this episode.

Quotes[edit]

  • Homer: Listen, you big, stupid space creature. NOBODY, but NOBODY, eats the Simpsons!
  • Narrator: Quoth the Raven--
    Bart: Eat my shorts!
    Lisa: Bart, stop it! He says "Nevermore." And that's all he'll ever say.
    Bart: Okay, okay.
(Sadly, this above exchange is often cut from syndicated reruns of this episode.)
  • Homer: Come back here, you little raven! D'oh!

References[edit]

External links[edit]

Two Cars in Every Garage and Three Eyes on Every Fish[edit]

"Two Cars in Every Garage and Three Eyes on Every Fish"
The Simpsons episode
Episode no. 17
Directed by Wesley Archer
Written by Sam Simon and John Swartzwelder
Production code 7F01
Original air date November 1, 1990
Chalkboard gag "I will not Xerox my butt." or "It's potato, not potatoe"
Couch gag The couch springs out into a bed
Guest appearance(s)

None

Seasons

"Two Cars in Every Garage and Three Eyes on Every Fish" is the fourth episode of The Simpsons' second season. The episode aired on November 1, 1990.

Synopsis[edit]

{{spoiler}}

Bart and Lisa go fishing downstream of the Springfield Nuclear Power Plant and Springfield Shopper reporter Dave Shutton pulls up just as Bart catches a three-eyed fish, Blinky. From the resulting publicity the governor, Mary Bailey, calls for an investigation of the power plant and its owner, Montgomery Burns. After an inspection, Mr. Burns is presented with a list of over 342 violations and is fined $56 million. Distraught, Mr. Burns talks to underperforming employee Homer Simpson who half-heartedly suggests Mr. Burns run for Governor. Mr. Burns pounces on the idea. Homer's support for Burns divides the Simpson house because Marge and Lisa support Bailey.

Burns's political advisors break the news to Burns that he is not well liked and force Burns to try being friendly and even smile. Burns also does a TV commercial, discussing Blinky with an actor portraying Charles Darwin, who claims Blinky is an evolutionary step. Combined with a smear campaign against Mary Bailey this eventually leads to Burns beating Bailey in the polls. On the night before the election, Smithers and his other advisors suggest that Burns have dinner at the Simpsons' house as an opportunity to put Burns "over the top". To everyone's surprise, Marge serves Blinky, the three-eyed fish that Bart caught, for dinner. Mr. Burns tries to act as if it doesn't bother him, but is not able to keep from spitting it out. The cameras flash as the bite flies through the air, but the press is gone and his gubernatorial campaign is over by the time the chunk hits the floor.

Trivia[edit]

  • The motto of the state Springfield is in is "Not Just Another State."
  • The line "You can't do this to me! I'm Charles Montgomery Burns!" parodies a quotation from Citizen Kane, which is "You can't do this to me! I'm Charles Foster Kane!" This also reveals the full name of Charles Montgomery Burns.

Quotes[edit]

  • Mr. Burns: (after eating a small bite of the fish) YOU CAN'T DO THIS TO ME! I'M CHARLES MONTGOMERY BURNS!
  • Marge: Homer, we're a Mary Bailey family.
    Homer: Mary Bailey isn't going to fire me if I don't vote for her.
    Lisa: Ooh, a political discussion! I feel like a Kennedy.
  • Bart: Is your boss governor yet?
    Homer: Not yet, son, not yet.

External links[edit]

Dancin' Homer[edit]

"Dancin' Homer"
The Simpsons episode
Episode no. 18
Directed by Mark Kirkland
Written by Ken Levine and David Issacs
Production code 7F05
Original air date November 8, 1990
Chalkboard gag "I will not trade pants with others"
Couch gag The family, sans Maggie, sits on the couch, and Maggie comes out of Marge's hair.
Guest appearance(s)

Tony Bennett; Tom Poston as the Capital City Goofball

Seasons

"Dancin' Homer" is the fifth episode of The Simpsons' second season. The episode aired on November 8, 1990.

Synopsis[edit]

{{spoiler}}

On a night at Moe's Tavern, Homer tells everyone "the story of how he became a loser."

It's Nuclear Plant Employee, Spouses and No More than Three Children Night at the Springfield Isotopes baseball game at Springfield Stadium. Mr. Burns throws the first ball, Bleeding Gums Murphy sings an extremely long version of "The Star Spangled Banner" that only Lisa stands up for during its entirity, and Bart wants a baseball signed by baseball player Flash Baylor. At the game, Mr. Burns sits with Homer, taunting the Isotopes, which are expected to lose again after losing 26 consecutive games, reportedly (in the world of The Simpsons) the longest in professional baseball. But when Homer fires up the crowd—to the tune of "Baby Elephant Walk" and the disappointment of his family—the Isotopes win a game.

Because of this, Homer is made the Springfield Isotopes mascot, "Dancin' Homer". Thanks to his spirit, the Isotopes win more games until one night, when after the Isotopes lose, Homer is promoted by Antoine "Tex" O'Hara to the team in Capital City. The Simpsons move to Capital City, to the tune of Tony Bennett singing a song about Capital City, and Homer becomes another mascot of the team, joining the Capital City Goofball. But when "Dancin' Homer" does his act in Capital City, he is booed and eventually fired from the team, ending Homer's story. The people at the bar suggest that Homer tell it again.

Trivia[edit]

  • First episode with the Springfield Isotopes.

Quotes[edit]

  • Mr. Burns: (chanting) The pitcher's off his rocker/Kissing Betty Crocker!
  • Capital City Goofball: If there's anything I can do for you, just squeeze the wheeze. (he squeezes his nose)

External links[edit]

Dead Putting Society[edit]

"Dead Putting Society"
The Simpsons episode
Episode no. 19
Directed by Rich Moore
Written by Jeff Martin
Production code 7F08
Original air date November 15, 1990
Chalkboard gag "I am not a 32 year old woman"
Couch gag Santa's Little Helper and Snowball II jump on the couch
Guest appearance(s)

None

Seasons

"Dead Putting Society" is the sixth episode of The Simpsons' second season. The episode aired on November 15, 1990.

Synopsis[edit]

{{spoiler}}

On a beautiful day, where Homer is mowing, he can't stand his neighbor, Ned Flanders. Ned invites Homer into his beautiful rumpus room to have some beer and club sandwiches. Homer protests against Flanders and accuses him and the Flanders family of having things the Simpsons do not have. Flanders asks Homer to leave. Homer worries in his sleep about Flanders. Discussing things with Marge, she suggests to him that Ned is a perfect neighbor, but Homer goes for a walk. Meanwhile, Maude suggests to Ned that he shouldn't be talking to her, and he writes a note to Homer with funny things in it, after hearing from Reverend Lovejoy that the Bible says that a gentle answer turns away wrath. Homer takes Bart for a round of miniature golf at Sir Putt-A-Lot's Merrie Olde Fun Center, unexpectedly joined by Ned and Todd Flanders.

The game goes well, and Bart and Todd know of a miniature golf tournament, with the first prize being $50. Bart and Todd decide to enter the tournament. Although Todd is very good at miniature golf, Homer is confident that Bart will win the tournament. Homer unsuccessfully helps Bart practice for the tournament, complete with putting a picture of Todd Flanders in Bart's room and making him stare at it angrily for 15 minutes every day. Lisa offers to help Bart practice, through her reading spiritual books that calm Bart's mind and she goes to the fun center to help him practice. Homer wants Flanders to know that he will make a bet with him—the father of the boy who does not win the tournament will mow the lawn of the house of the boy who wins, in his wife's Sunday dress. Marge signs the bet.

It is the day of the tournament, and Bart and Todd are doing well, proceeding to the final round of the tournament. In an extremely close match, as it progresses, Bart and Todd each do well, and tie by the time they each do the eighth hole. Bart and Todd are both worried it is difficult for them, and they worry that they could tie, so Bart and Todd both decide they are equally good, and call it a draw. Because of this, Homer and Ned must wear each wife's best Sunday dress and mow each other's lawn.

Trivia[edit]

  • This is the first episode to feature the Flanders family prominently.
  • The title of the episode is a reference to the film Dead Poets Society.

Quotes[edit]

  • Ned Flanders: Hey there, neighbor. The Lord's certainly given us a beautiful day today, huh?
    Homer: Hello, Flanders.
    Ned: Doing a little yard work, huh?
    Homer: Who told? Marge, beer me!
  • Homer: That shot is impossible! Jack Nicholson himself couldn't make it!
  • Homer: All right, knock it off!!
    Ned Flanders: Knock what off, Simpson?
    Homer: You've been rubbing it in my nose since I got here! Your family is better than my family, your beer comes from farther away than my beer, you and your son like each other, your wife's butt is higher than my wife's butt! You make me sick!
    Ned: Simpson, I'm afraid I'm going to have to ask you to leave. I hope you understand!
    Homer: I wouldn't stay on a bet!
  • Homer: Come on, Bart! Remember what Vince Lombardi said: If you lose, you're out of the family!

External links[edit]

Bart vs. Thanksgiving[edit]

"Bart vs. Thanksgiving"
The Simpsons episode
Episode no. 20
Directed by David Silverman
Written by George Meyer
Production code 7F07
Original air date November 22, 1990
Chalkboard gag "I will not do that thing with my tongue"
Couch gag The family finds Grampa on the couch
Guest appearance(s)

None

Seasons

"Bart vs. Thanksgiving" is the seventh episode of The Simpsons' second season. The episode aired on November 22, 1990.

Synopsis[edit]

{{spoiler}} It's Thanksgiving, and Lisa is making a centerpiece for Thanksgiving which honors women such as Georgia O'Keefe, Susan B. Anthony, and Marjory Stoneman Douglas, who worked her life to preserve the Florida Everglades. The family prepares for their Thanksgiving dinner, in which they have invited Grampa, Patty, Selma, and Mother Bouvier. When the family has their dinner, they have turkey, Patty's Swedish meatballs, Selma's trout almandine, and of course, the turkey with the cranberry sauce and the pumpkin pie. When the family has dinner, Bart brings in the turkey, and he argues that Lisa's centerpiece she made is blocking up space. Bart and Lisa get into a fight, and Lisa's centerpiece is ruined. As punishment, Bart is sent to his room.

Marge tells Bart that he can come down to dinner, but only if he apologizes to Lisa. Bart refuses, and he runs out of the house with Santa's Little Helper, swiping a drumstick from Montgomery Burns's dinner at his mansion, walking to the seedy part of town where he donates at a blood plasma center for money (and gets a free cookie too) (which Santa's Little Helper eats), and going to a soup kitchen for a Thanksgiving dinner and appearing on TV being interviewed by Kent Brockman, where he says he never apologized.

Bart returns home. He is afraid to go in after he has a nightmare, but he apologizes to Lisa. The Simpsons finally have turkey sandwiches as their Thanksgiving dinner—at 11:00 p.m., displaying the kind of thankful spirit that was absent from their earlier dinner

Trivia[edit]

  • First appearance of Marge's mother, Jackie Bouvier.
  • It's revealed that the Dallas Cowboys are Homer's favorite team in this episode. Later in the series, in episode 3F23, "You Only Move Twice", Homer says he always wanted to own the Cowboys as his lifelong dream, but he gets the Denver Broncos from Hank Scorpio instead.
  • Maggie actually speaks in this episode, with Yeardley Smith, the voice of Lisa, voicing her. She says, in a nightmarish vision Bart has when the Simpsons blame him for everything, "It's your fault I can't talk!" Her lips do not move, however.

Quotes[edit]

  • Lisa: (reading a poem)
    I saw the best meals of my generation
    destroyed by the madness of my brother.
    My soul carved in slices
    by spiky-haired demons.
  • Bart: Twelve bucks! Hey, I can bleed!
    Nurse: Hey, you've gotta be eighteen to sell your blood. Let's see some ID.
    Bart: Here ya go, dollface.
    Nurse: Okay, Homer, just relax.
    Bart: Ow!
  • Bart: All right! Twelve big ones and free grub to boot. Viva Skid Row!

External links[edit]

Bart the Daredevil[edit]

"Bart the Daredevil"
The Simpsons episode
Episode no. 21
Directed by Wesley Meyer Archer
Written by Jay Kogen and Wallace Wolodarsky
Production code 7F06
Original air date December 6, 1990
Chalkboard gag "I will not drive the principal's car"
Couch gag Homer's weight tips the couch.
Guest appearance(s)

None

Seasons

"Bart the Daredevil" is the eighth episode of The Simpsons' second season. The episode aired on December 6, 1990.

Synopsis[edit]

{{spoiler}}

When Homer and Bart, at Moe's Tavern and the Simpson home respectively, watch a TV wrestling match, they both see a commercial for a monster truck rally featuring Truck-o-Saurus, and are thrilled that they are interested in going to the one-night-only rally on Saturday night. However, Lisa reminds Homer and Bart that her recital is on Saturday night as well, in which she will be playing her first solo. Homer and Bart are embarrassed, until Marge suggests that they can go to Lisa's recital (which is the first in a series of Saturday night concerts) first, then to the rally. Homer agrees, and at the recital, Lisa plays a solo, as does Todd Flanders on the violin. The Simpsons go to the Springfield Speedway to see Truck-o-Saurus, but all the parking spots are taken, and the Simpsons accidentally drive onto the Springfield Speedway, where Truck-o-Saurus attacks the family car.

Fortunately, the car's frame is not damaged, and for being such good sports, the family gets a bottle of Truck-o-Saurus Private Reserve champagne. As the last event at the rally, a surprising guest who appears is "the world's greatest daredevil, Captain Lance Murdoch. Murdoch appears to his most dangerous stunt, in which he leaps over a tank of water filled with sharks, electric eels, piranha, alligators, and a lion. He performs the stunt on his motorcycle and survives after no one, except for Bart, watches the stunt, but he falls into the pool and goes to the hospital. After the rally, Bart has his own dreams of becoming a daredevil, and says he wants to be one.

Bart becomes a daredevil and goes to the hospital to see Dr. Hibbert, who suggests a way Bart can stop imitating the stunts. Nonetheless, Bart still becomes a daredevil, jumping over a swimming pool, some animals, and Homer on his hammock. On a class trip to Springfield Gorge, Bart announces that on the coming Saturday, he will jump over the gorge. Bart also sees a severely injured Captain Lance Murdoch in the hospital (with Dr. Hibbert's help), and he tells Murdoch about the stunt. Murdoch says that is a good thing, and he plans to do it against the wishes of Homer, who insists that Bart not do it. After a "heart-to-heart talk" with Homer, Bart goes to the gorge and tries to jump it, but is stopped at the last second be Homer, who resolves to jump the gorge to show Bart what it's like to see a family member needlessly risking their life. Homer jumps the gorge, but he is injured and put on an ambulance via a helicopter. But when the ambulance rams into a tree, Homer falls into the gorge again, and is found to be severly injured at the hospital.

Trivia[edit]

  • First appearance of Dr. Hibbert.
  • Matt Groening said in an interview that this episode was his favorite Simpsons episode.

Quotes[edit]

  • (The Truck-o-Saurus commercial)
    Announcer: This Saturday, for one night only, your life will be changed forever. Saturday! Saturday! Saturday at the Springfield Speedway! Speedway! Speedway! Don "Crusher" Woodard, John "The Skunk" Trumane, and the Team Tomomatsu Dirt Riding Dunk Masters in the year's biggest MONSTER TRUCK RALLY! One night only. Plus the amazing, the astounding, the unbelievable TRUCK-O-SAURUS! Twenty tons and four stories of car-crunching, fire-breathing, prehistoric insanity!
    Homer and Bart: Whoa!
    Announcer: One night only. One night only. One night only at the Springfield Speedway this Saturday. If you miss this, you'd better be dead or in jail. And if you're in jail, break out!! (The phrase "Be there!" echoes as Homer leaves Moe's.)
  • Principal Skinner: Tonight, Sherberts, oops, heh heh, Schubert's Unfinished Symphony.
    Homer: Oh good, unfinished. This shouldn't take long.
  • Dr. Hibbert: Bart, in this ward are the children who have been hurt by imitating stunts they saw on television, movies, and the legitimate stage. This little boy broke his leg trying to fly like Superman. This boy's brother hit him in the head with a wrench, mimicking a recent TV wrestling match. I won't even subject you to the horrors of our Three Stooges ward.
    Marge: Gee, I never thought TV was such a dangerous influence.
    Dr. Hibbert: Well, as tragic as all this is, it's a small price to pay for countless hours of top-notch entertainment.
  • (after Homer arrives and when Bart attempts to jump the gorge)
    Bart: Hey, what gives?
    Homer: Boy, I tried ordering you. I tried punishing you. And, God help me, I even tried reasoning with you. And the only thing left for me to do is jump the gorge myself.
    Bart: Uh—What? Why?
    Homer: Because that way you'll see what it's like to witness a family member stupidly risking his life for no good reason!
    Bart: But Dad, you'll never make it.
    Homer: Don't you think I know that?
    (Homer attempts to jump the gorge.)
    Homer: Good-bye, son.
    Bart: Wait, Dad! Don't do it! I won't jump anymore. I promise.
    Homer: Oh-oh-oh! Oh, thank God! Thank God, thank God!
    Bart: I love you, Dad!
    Homer: I love you too, son. You know, boy, I don't think I've ever felt as close to you as I do right—Huh?
  • Captain Lance Murdoch: It's always nice to see young people taking an interest in danger. Now, son, a lot of people are going to be telling you you're crazy, and maybe they're right. But I want to tell you three things. Bones heal. Chicks dig scars. And the United States of America has the best doctor to daredevil ratio in the world.
  • Homer: (to Captain Lance Murdoch) You think you've got guts? Try raising my kids.

External link[edit]

Episode capsule at The Simpsons Archive

Itchy & Scratchy & Marge[edit]

"Itchy & Scratchy & Marge"
The Simpsons episode
Episode no. 22
Directed by Jim Reardon
Written by John Swartzwelder
Production code 7F09
Original air date December 20, 1990
Chalkboard gag "I will not pledge allegiance to Bart"
Couch gag The couch is missing
Guest appearance(s)

Alex Rocco as Roger Meyers, Jr.

Seasons

"Itchy & Scratchy & Marge" is the ninth episode of The Simpsons' second season. The episode aired on December 20, 1990.

Synopsis[edit]

{{spoiler}}

When Homer attempts to build Marge a spice rack, Maggie hits Homer on the head with a mallet. After this is done, Maggie attempts to hit Homer on the head with a pencil, which is stopped by Marge. Marge forbids Bart, Lisa, and Maggie from watching cartoons, after she blames The Itchy & Scratchy Show for Maggie's actions. Although Bart watches Itchy & Scratchy at Milhouse's house, and Lisa watches it at Janey's, Marge writes a letter to the producers of the show asking them to tone down their violence. In response, Roger Meyers, Jr.—the CEO of Itchy & Scratchy International—writes a letter to Marge, calling her a "screwball". She says that she will show them "what one screwball can do".

The family pickets outside the Itchy & Scratchy studios, forming SNUH, or "Springfieldians for Nonviolence, Understanding, and Helping". Marge's protest gains momentum, and more people join the group. SNUH also pickets The Krusty the Klown Show, where Itchy & Scratchy is shown on. The producers of the show suggest a new character based on Marge, which is a squirrel who tells Itchy and Scratchy to stop fighting, but in response, they whack her head off. Marge appears on Kent Brockman's show, Smartline, suggesting that Itchy & Scratchy be made less violent. Eventually, a new short ("Porch Pals") airs, but Bart, Lisa, and other kids across Springfield reject the cleaned-up show, leaving to do wholesome childlike things.

Meanwhile, Michelangelo's David goes on a coast-to-coast tour of the U.S. with stops in New York City and Springfield, and possibly Boston, Chicago, and Los Angeles. As it goes on tour, the members of SNUH urge Marge to protest the sculpture, insisting that the sculpture is offensive. However, Marge argues that the sculpture is a masterpiece. Itchy & Scratchy go back to their violent cartoons, and Homer and Marge see Micheangelo's David sculpture.

Quotes[edit]

  • Lisa: But Mom, if you take our cartoons away, we'll grow up without a sense of humor and be robots!
    Bart: Really? What kind of robots?
  • Marge: (in response to a violent scene on Itchy & Scratchy on TV) What kind of warped human being would find that funny? (Homer chuckles in the background)
  • (Marge's letter to Itchy & Scratchy International)
    Dear purveyors of senseless violence:

    I know this may sound silly at first, but I believe that the cartoons you show to our children are influencing their behavior in a negative way. Please try to tone down the psychotic violence in your otherwise fine programming. Yours truly, Marge Simpson.
  • Roger Meyers, Jr.: Dear valued viewer, thank you for taking an interest in the Itchy & Scratchy program. Enclosed is a personally autographed photo of America's favorite cat-and-mouse team to add to your collection. In regards to your specific comments about the show, our research shows that one person cannot make a difference, no matter how big a screwball she is, so let me close by saying...
    Marge: (reading the letter) And the horse I rode in on? I'll show them what one screwball can do!
  • Homer: D'oh! Twenty million women in the world, and I had to marry Jane Fonda.
  • (SNUH's chant)
    Marge: What do we want?
    Crowd: Less and less violence in children's programming!
    Marge: When do we want it?
    Crowd: Now!

External links[edit]

Bart Gets Hit By A Car[edit]

"Bart Gets Hit By A Car"
The Simpsons episode
Episode no. 23
Directed by Mark Kirkland
Written by John Swartzwelder
Production code 7F10
Original air date January 10, 1991
Chalkboard gag "I will not sell school property"
Couch gag Homer bumps everybody off the couch
Guest appearance(s)

Phil Hartman as Lionel Hutz (first appearance)

Seasons

"Bart Gets Hit By A Car" is the tenth episode of The Simpsons' second season. The episode aired on January 10, 1991.

Synopsis[edit]

{{spoiler}}

Mr. Burns's car hits Bart when he is skateboarding. Bart has an out-of-body experience, seeing what it is like in Heaven and Hell, but it is found out that he was actually okay, waking up in a hospital room in Dr. Hibbert's room. The injuries Bart has are a bump on the head and a broken toe, but there is nothing serious. In the room, an attorney named Lionel Hutz comes in and suggests that Homer sue Mr. Burns. Burns offers Homer $100, but he refuses, and he sees Lionel Hutz. Hutz promises Homer a cash settlement of $1,000,000. They see Dr. Nick Riviera, who thinks Bart is a very sick boy. Marge, however, decries Dr. Nick for saying Bart is sick, arguing that he is not a real doctor.

Homer sues Mr. Burns, with Bart offering his (unbelievable) testimony that he was playing innocently, until the "Luxury Car of Death" hit him, and Burns saying in his testimony that he was driving to the orphanage to pass out toys until Bart darted in front of him. The jury does not believe Mr. Burns' testimony, yelling at his lawyers and ordering them to bring Homer and Marge to his house. At his mansion, Burns offers Homer a $500,000 settlement, leaving Homer and Marge to discuss it, but Homer objects to the settlement, insisting that Burns knows he will lose the trial and pay the family $1 million. Burns cancels the settlement after overhearing the lawsuit is based on false evidence.

At the trial, Marge is called to the stand. In her testimony, she denounces Dr. Nick Riviera as being a phony doctor concerned about wrapping Bart in bandages than in making him feel better, while proving Dr. Hibbert to be a real doctor. She is asked to describe Bart's intense mental anguish and suffering, and when she does, she isn't sure how intense it is, although she mentions that Bart did miss three days of school, and she mentions something of putting a dollar amount on the hardships. Marge, offering honest testimony, destroys Hutz's case. A downbeat Homer worries that Marge cost him $1,000,000, and he tells Marge he is going to Moe's. Marge comes into Moe's and asks Homer to forgive her for her testimony, but he says that he is not sure he loves her anymore, until he looks her in the eyes to find out and feels happy, and they love each other.

Trivia[edit]

  • The Devil was way off in his calculation of the next time the Yankees would have won the American League pennant -- not "a century from now," but 1996.
  • Sign in Dr. Nick Riviera's office: "Yes, we use anesthetic!" Also, one of his diplomas reads: "I went to medical school for four years and all I got was this lousy diploma."
  • The song "Tijuana Taxi" by Herb Alpert and the Tijuana Brass is heard twice in the show's history: in this episode (as Mr. Burns is recalling the time leading up to the incident), and in On A Clear Day I Can't See My Sister.

Quotes[edit]

  • The Devil: (when Bart is in Hell) According to this, you're not due to arrive here until the next time the Yankees win the pennant. That's nearly a century from now. (chuckles) Boy, is my face red.
  • Homer: He's awake!
    Marge: Oh, Bart! We thought for a minute you'd gone away from us.
    Bart: I did go away, Mom! I was miles and miles and miles away, writhing in agony in the pits of Hell! And you were there! And you and you and you. You, I've never seen before.
    Homer: Hey, yeah, who are you? I saw you chasing Bart's ambulance.
    Lionel Hutz: Hutz is the name, Mr. Simpson. Lionel Hutz, attorney-at-law. Here's my card. It turns into a sponge when you put it in water.
  • Lenny: Hey, Simpson, I heard Mr. Burns crushed your boy.
    Homer: Yeah. If I wasn't so spineless, I'd march into Mr. Burns' office right now and—
    Smithers: SIMPSON!!
    Homer: Aah! (coughing)
    Smithers: Mr. Burns wants you to march into his office right now!
    Homer: Uh-oh.
  • Mr. Burns: (in his vision of the accident) NOOOO! Take me! I'm old! (return to the courtroom) And that's what happened. (no response)
  • Marge: (giving an opinion on Dr. Nick) Hmm. Well, to be honest, he seemed a lot more concerned about wrapping Bart in bandages than in making him feel better. And he mispronounced words that even I know, like "abdomen". And his office was dirty. Now that I think about it, I'm not sure he's even a doctor.
    Homer: D'oh!
  • Marge: Homer, I'd like you to forgive me for doing the right thing.
    Homer: Oh, Marge!
    Marge: We've squabbled over money before. Hmm... never this much. I mean, I know this is different than that time I washed your pants with a $20 in the pocket.

External link[edit]

Episode capsule at The Simpsons Archive

One Fish, Two Fish, Blowfish, Blue Fish[edit]

"One Fish, Two Fish, Blowfish, Blue Fish"
The Simpsons episode
Episode no. 24
Directed by Wesley M. Archer
Written by Nell Scovell
Production code 7F11
Original air date January 24, 1991
Chalkboard gag "I will not cut corners" (Bart uses ditto marks to repeat it)
Couch gag The couch tips over backwards and Maggie pops up from behind it
Guest appearance(s)

Larry King; George Takei as Akira; Joey Miyashima as the Master Chef; Sab Shimono as the Apprentice Chef; and Diane Tanaka as the Hostess

Seasons

"One Fish, Two Fish, Blowfish, Blue Fish" is the eleventh episode of The Simpsons' second season. The episode aired on January 24, 1991.

Synopsis[edit]

{{spoiler}}

Bored of having meatloaf for supper, Marge suggests that the family, instead of having pork chops the next night, go to a sushi bar, "The Happy Sumo". Homer reluctantly accepts, and the family goes there. When Homer goes there, he eats a type of sushi called Fugu, but it is badly prepared and Homer is told that he may have been poisoned. Homer and Marge go the hospital. Dr. Hibbert informs Homer he would have 24 hours left to live but actually has 22. Homer is told that he is expected to go through five stages, and he makes a list of things he wants to do on the last day of his life.

On his last days, things he does are have a "man-to-man" with Bart by teaching him to shave, listen to Lisa play her saxophone, borrow Ned Flanders's camcorder to make a videotape for Maggie (he also briefly considers attending the Flanders family's barbecue), and reconcile with Grampa, until he is arrested for speeding. Homer calls Barney, who is asked to pay $50 to bail out him. After he is bailed, with not much time left, he tells off Mr. Burns, has one last drink at Moe's with his friends, and hurries home in time, to say a good-bye to his family. Homer listens to Larry King read the Bible on tape, but falls asleep, and is thought to be dead, until Marge finds he is alive. When Homer is awake again, he vows to live life to the fullest....by watching a bowling tournament and eating pork rinds.

Trivia[edit]

Quotes[edit]

  • Dr. Hibbert: Now, a little death anxiety is normal. You can expect to go through five stages. The first is denial.
    Homer: No way, because I'm not dying!
    Dr. Hibbert: ...second is anger.
    Homer: (starts to get mad) Why you little!
    Dr. Hibbert: After that comes fear.
    Homer: (worried) What's after fear? What's after fear?
    Dr. Hibbert: Bargaining.
    Homer: Doc, you gotta get me outta this. I'll make it worth your while.
    Dr. Hibbert: Finally acceptance.
    Homer: Well, we all gotta go sometime.
    Dr. Hibbert: Mr. Simpson, your progress astounds me.
  • Homer: I'll call Barney! (dialtone rings)
    Barney: (sings a the tune of a song with part of A Fifth of Beethoven in background) Nobody's Here (repeats 3 times and echoed in background)
    Homer: Damn those novelty telephone answering tapes! Well, thanks a lot, Thanks a lot Barney I just wasted my one phone call on your stup...
    Barney: What? What? I'm home! I'm home! (background sounded like he opened/closed the front door of his house)
  • Homer's list of "Dumb Things I Gotta Do Today":
    1. Make list (crossed out)
    2. Eat a hearty breakfast
    3. Make videotape for Maggie
    4. Have man-to-man with Bart
    5. Listen to Lisa play her sax
    6. Make funeral arrangement
    7. Make peace with Dad
    8. Beer with the boys at the bar
    9. Tell off boss
    10. Go hang gliding
    11. Plant a tree
    12. A final dinner with my beloved family
    13. Be intamit [sic] with Marge
    14. Watch the sunrise
  • Moe: Hello, Moe's Tavern. Birthplace of the Rob Roy.
    Bart: Is Seymour there? Last name Butts.
    Moe: Just a sec. Hey, is there a Butts here? A Seymour Butts? Hey everybody, I wanna Seymour Butts! (realizes) Wait a minute... Listen, you little scum-sucking pus-bucket! When I get my hands on you, I'm gonna pull out your eyeballs with a corkscrew!

External links[edit]

The Way We Was[edit]

"The Way We Was"
The Simpsons episode
Episode no. 25
Directed by David Silverman
Written by Al Jean, Mike Reiss and Sam Simon
Production code 7F12
Original air date January 31, 1991
Chalkboard gag "I will not get very far with this attitude"
Couch gag The sofa falls through the floor
Guest appearance(s)

Jon Lovitz as Artie Ziff

Seasons

"The Way We Was" is the 12th episode of the second season of The Simpsons. The episode tells the story of how Marge and Homer first met and fell in love.

The title is a reference to the movie The Way We Were.

Synopsis[edit]

{{spoilers}} When the TV breaks down, Marge tells the kids the story of how she and Homer first met. We flashback to 1974, when they were both in their senior year of high school. While Homer is quite the slacker, Marge is a responsible student. But when she was at a feminist rally burning a bra on school grounds, she's sent to detention. Already there is Homer together with Barney, having been busted for smoking in the school restrooms. Homer is blindstruck by the beautiful Marge.

To get to be around her more, Homer joins the debate team that Marge is on. But there, Marge is more interested in the more... articulate Artie Ziff. As a plan B, Homer pretends to be a French student so that he can be tutored by Marge. It appears to be working, and when Homer asks Marge to the senior prom, she says yes. However, when Homer reveals he doesn't really take French, Marge is furious and instead decides to go with Artie Ziff.

Homer doesn't realise that Marge has rejected him, and so shows up for prom night to pick her up. He is thrown out by Marge, and so he has to go the prom by himself. Later, Marge and Artie have left the prom and are being intimate, when Artie clumsily steps over the line. Angrily, Marges leaves him, and then goes to pick up Homer: her true love.

Quotes[edit]

  • Homer, visiting the school guidance counselor:

"Hi, I'm Homer Simpson, I need some guidance, Counselor."

  • Homer, to Marge:

"I've got a problem. Once you stop this car, I'm going to hug you, and kiss you, and then I'll never be able to let you go."

Homer vs. Lisa and the 8th Commandment[edit]

"Homer vs. Lisa and the 8th Commandment"
The Simpsons episode
Episode no. 26
Directed by Rich Moore
Written by Steve Pepoon
Production code 7F13
Original air date February 7, 1991
Chalkboard gag "I will not make flatulent noises in class"
Couch gag The family dances before getting on the couch
Guest appearance(s)

None

Seasons

"Homer vs. Lisa and the 8th Commandment" is the 13th episode of the second season of The Simpsons. This episode tells the story of Homer buying stolen cable.

Synopsis[edit]

{{spoilers}} After seeing Ned Flanders reject an offer to get an illegal cable hook-up, Homer chases after the cable man and wants to be hooked up for free. He likes the new channels he gets, which the family watches with him. Lisa, however, feels suspicious. She fears that because Homer violated the Eighth Commandment, he will go to Hell when he dies. She sees Reverend Lovejoy at church. He suggests to Lisa that she should not watch anything on Homer's cable hook-up.

In spite of Lisa not watching the cable hook-up, Homer invites his friends from the power plant (even Mr. Burns and Smithers), Apu, Moe, and Barney to watch a fight, "The Bout to Knock the Other Guy Out!", on pay-per-view. Homer realizes that he has felt guilty about stealing. After the fight is over, Homer aims to cut his hook-up, but he accidentially cuts the entire cable transmission in Springfield.

Principal Charming[edit]

"Principal Charming"
The Simpsons episode
Episode no. 27
Directed by Mark Kirkland
Written by David Stern
Production code 7F15
Original air date March 7, 1991
Chalkboard gag "I will not belch the national anthem"
Couch gag The couch sproings out into a bed
Guest appearance(s)

None

Seasons

"Principal Charming" is the fourteenth episode of The Simpsons' second season, airing on February 14, 1991. The title is a play on Prince Charming.

Synopsis[edit]

{{spoiler}}

Patty and Selma visit a wedding, to a man that could have easily been Selma's bride had Patty not got in the way. Selma realises that she needs to find a husband and begs Marge to help her. Marge enlists the help of Hoemer to seek one out. However, Homer fails to find anyone suitable.

Meanwhile, Bart pulls a big prank by pouring Sodium tetrasulfate onto the grass. In the principal's office, he is told to call his father, who is currently at Moe's Tavern. After asking for Homer Sexual, Prinicpal Skinner takes the receiver, and Homer goes to the school. Here, he decides that Skinner is the perfect man for Selma. He invites the Principal to meet her, but he falls for Patty instead.

Skinner starts to go out with a slightly unwilling Patty, much to Selma's jealousy. Meanwhile, Bart takes advantage of the opportunity to take control of the school. Skinner enlists Bart's help to get Patty to marry him, while Homer fixes a date between Selma and Barney.

Skinner takes Patty to the top of the Bell Tower to propose. Patty is flattered, but declines. In his grieve, Principal Skinner sees what has happened to the school, and takes back control. Patty informs Selma of events, so she breaks up her own date. Things then return to normal.

Trivia[edit]

  • This is the first episode to address Selma's fear of dieing alone.
  • It also marks the first appearance of Groundskeeper Willie, (who's first line is "You haven't seen the last of Groundskeeper Willie".)
  • Bart has an entire filing cabinet of mis-deeds in school. By the episode, The Wandering Juvie, he has three police filing cabinets.
  • The "Tomorrow is another school day" scene is a hybrid of two scenes from Gone With the Wind

Quotes[edit]

  • Homer: Which one's Selma, again?
    Marge: She's the one who likes Police Academy movies and Hummel figurines, and walking through the park on clear autumn days.
    Homer: Oh, yeah yeah yeah. But I thought she was the one that didn't like to be ... you know ... touched.
    Marge: It's Patty who chose a life of celibacy. Selma simply had celibacy thrust upon her.
  • Marge: You will find Selma a man!
    Homer: All right.
    Marge: And not just any man.
    Homer: Okay!
    Marge: He should be honest, and, and caring. And well-off. And handsome.
    Homer: Hey! Why should she have a better husband than you do!?
  • Karl... Too handsome.
    Smithers... Jerk.
    Ms. Finch... Not a man.
    Apu... Pro: Discounted snack treats. Con: Dangerous profession.
    ?... Pro: Nice stride. Con: Complete stranger.
    ? Pro: Smoker. Con: Just a sign.
    Principal Skinner... Pros:
    * Uses big words.
    * Dislikes the boy.
    * Something
    Cons:
    * Possible Homer Sexual.
  • Barney: She broke my heart, Moe.
    Moe: Don't worry, Barney. Time heals all wounds.
    Barney: Well, whaddya know! You're right! And look, a whole pitcher to myself!

External Links[edit]

Episode Capsule on "Simpsons Archive"

Oh Brother, Where Art Thou?[edit]

"Oh Brother, Where Art Thou?"
The Simpsons episode
Episode no. 28
Directed by W.M. "Bud" Archer
Written by Jeff Martin
Production code 7F16
Original air date February 21, 1991
Chalkboard gag "I will not sell land in Florida"
Couch gag Maggie is in Marge's hair
Guest appearance(s)
Seasons

"Oh Brother, Where Art Thou?" is the fifteenth episode of The Simpsons' second season.

Synopsis[edit]

{{spoiler}}

After watching the latest McBain movie, Grampa Simpson suffers a heart attack. This prompts him to confess a long-hidden secret: Homer has a half-brother.

As Grampa explains, he had met a carnival floozy and prostitute a year before marrying Homer's mother. They had a son, and left him at the Shelbyville Orphanage. Detirmined to find his brother, Homer and his family go to the orphanage and find out that Abe's son was adopted by a Mr. and Mrs. Powell and named Herbert.

Herb Powell (who looks just like Homer, except with more hair and less gut) is the head of Powell Motors car company (in danger of being taken over by the Japanese because of otherwise poor management). He is very rich, but is quite unhappy not knowing who he is and where he comes from. He is overjoyed upon hearing of his half-brother and invites the entire Simpson family to stay at his mansion in Detroit.

Bart, Lisa, and Maggie are enthrilled by Herb's wealthy lifestyle (though Marge constantly worries about spoiling her kids), and Herb decides that Homer, being an "average" American, is the perfect person to design a new car for his company. Homer adds all sorts of weird effects-like bubble domes, fins and a horn that playes "La Cucaracha."

At the unveiling of "The Homer," Herb is horrified to discover that the car is a monstrosity that costs $82,000 US. Herb's company folds, his mansion is sold off and he leaves regretting that he ever met his brother. Lisa laments, "His life was an unbridled success... until he found out, he was a Simpson."

Herb returns, and his plight is resolved, in the later episode "Brother Can You Spare Two Dimes?"

Bart's Dog Gets An F[edit]

"Bart's Dog Gets an F"
The Simpsons episode
Episode no. 29
Directed by Jim Reardon
Written by Jon Vitti
Production code 7F14
Original air date March 7, 1991
Chalkboard gag "I will not sell school property"
Couch gag All the family sit on the coach and fit, including the pets
Guest appearance(s)
Seasons

"Bart's Dog Gets an F" is the sixteenth episode of The Simpsons' second season, airing on March 7, 1991. Its name is likely taken from the episode Bart Gets and F, which aired at the start of the season.

Synopsis[edit]

{{spoiler}}

Lisa has the mumps and has to spend a few days away from school. While Marge teaches her to sewing, Homer goes to the mall to buy some magazines fo her. There he sees some expensive shoes, which he saw Flanders with earlier. The next day, he buys a giant cookie.

Marge shows Lisa a patchwork quilt, which is a family heirloom. Lisa makes her own contribution to him, but then Santa's Little Helper rips it up, also destroying the shoes and cookie. Homer wants to get rid of the dog, but Lisa convinces them to take it to an obedience school first.

Santa's Little Helper does not do well at the Obedience School as Bart is unwilling to use a choke chain. The night before the final exam, Bart and Santa's Little Helper play together. This bonding breaks down the communication barrier and allows Santa's Little Helper to pass.

Trivia[edit]

  • The moment between Marge and Lisa where they touch fingers is in homage to "The Creation" by Michelangelo, over the creation of Lisa's new family tradition. It could also be a reference to the movie E.T., The Extraterrestrial., where Elliot and E.T do the same thing with their fingers.

Quotes[edit]

  • Bart: No way, she's faking! If Lisa stays home, I stay home.
    Lisa: If Bart stays home, I'm going to school.
    Bart: Fine, then... Wait a minute... If Lisa goes to school, then I go to school, but then Lisa stays home, so I stay home, so Lisa goes to school...
    Marge: Lisa, don't confuse your brother like that.
  • Homer: Oh, 125 bucks...
    Flanders appears in a `thought' balloon over Homer's head
    Flanders: Sometimes, you got to spoil yourself... spoil yourself... spoil yourself...
    Homer: But I can't afford to...
    Flanders: Simpson! I order you to buy those shoes!
    Homer: Okay, Flanders, you're the boss! Heh heh heh.
  • Bart: Now... Sit! I said, Sit! Um, take a walk. Sniff that other dog's butt. See? He does exactly what I tell him.
  • Miss Winthrop: You son of a bitch. Good show!

External Links[edit]

Episode Capsule on "Simpsons Archive"

Old Money[edit]

"Old Money"
The Simpsons episode
Episode no. 30
Directed by David Silverman
Written by Jay Kogen and Wallace Wolodarsky
Production code 7F17
Original air date March 28, 1991
Chalkboard gag "I will not grease the monkey bars"
Couch gag Grampa wakes up on the couch
Guest appearance(s)

Audrey Meadows as Beatrice "Bea" Simmons

Seasons

"Old Money" is the 17th episode of the second season of The Simpsons. The episode aired on March 28 1991.

Synopsis[edit]

{{spoilers}}

Grampa, after a Sunday outing with the family, falls in love with Beatrice Simmons when their pills are mixed up at the Retirement Castle. They fall in love and go for a date, leading up to her birthday on a Sunday, but when Homer makes Grampa come on the family outing to the Discount Lion Safari and locks him in the car, he misses Bea's birthday. The family's car is stuck in the mud, but they manage to leave. Grampa returns home, expecting to see Bea, until he finds out that Bea has died of a burst ventricle when he was out with the family. Grampa is saddened, attending her funeral.

After she dies, Grampa receives Bea's inheritance of $106,000. First, he looks at buying things for himself, until the ghost of Bea Simmons, when he visits an amusement park, suggests that he give the money (his inheritance is now $100,000, because he spent $6,000 on a fez that Napoleon supposedly once wore) to some worthy causes. After interviews with much people across Springfield, Grampa attempts to spend the money on gambling at the casino, until Homer stops him from doing so. In the end, Grampa decides that he spend the inheritance on renovating the retirement home, and adding a new room named the Beatrice Simmons Dining Room.

Trivia[edit]

  • This is the only Simpsons episode that mentions characters a voice actor voices in the cast list.
  • Professor Frink, then unknown, makes an appearance in this episode.

Brush with Greatness[edit]

"Brush with Greatness"
The Simpsons episode
Episode no. 31
Directed by Jim Reardon
Written by Brian K. Roberts
Production code 7F18
Original air date April 11, 1991
Chalkboard gag "I will not hide behind the Fifth Amendment"
Couch gag The couch tips over with the family sitting on it and Maggie sits in its place
Guest appearance(s)

Ringo Starr; Jon Lovitz as Professor Lombardo

Seasons

"Brush with Greatness" is the 18th episode from the second season of The Simpsons. The episode aired on April 11 1991.

Synopsis[edit]

After Bart and Lisa see Krusty do his show at the Mt. Splashmore water park, they ask Homer if they can go there. Homer gets annoyed, but reluctantly decides to take them there. The family goes to Mt. Splashmore, where they ride H2WHOA!, but it is crowded. As Homer goes on H2WHOA!, he gets stuck in there. He is lodged in a section of a pipe, which is taken out. After he is rescued, he realizes that he needs to lose weight, and he does. He announces that he will go on a diet.

When Homer's weights are being found, Bart stumbles on paintings of Ringo Starr Marge made as a student in high school, when she had a crush on him. Lisa asks Marge what her painting talent was as a schoolgirl, and she says that as a high school student, she was scolded for doing a painting of Ringo Starr. She also recalls sending a painting to him for an "honest opinion", which she also recalls never actually got a response. Lisa suggests that Marge take a painting class at Springfield Community College, which she does. She makes a painting of Homer, which her professor, Lombardo, praises. It wins the college art show.

Mr. Burns wants Marge to paint his portrait for the Burns Wing of the Springfield Art Museum. She reluctantly agrees, as long as Burns insists that the painting portray him as a beautiful man. While Burns heckles Marge as she does the painting, Homer finds out that he weighs 239 pounds, which is 21 less than what it previously was. After Burns insults Homer, Marge insists that he leave the house, until Homer encourages Marge to finish the painting. She does, and at the opening of the Burns Wing, she unveils the painting. The painting depicts a naked, frail, and weak Burns. The people are shocked, until Marge explains that it depicts what Burns actually looks like. Everyone, even Burns, praises Marge's painting.

Trivia[edit]

  • This is the first Simpsons episode to make a verbal use of the word "genitalia", and the first episode in which a former member of The Beatles (Ringo Starr) appears.

Quotes[edit]

  • (Ringo Starr's reply to Marge's letter)
    Ringo Starr: Dear Marge, thanks for the fab painting of Yours Truly. I hung it on me wall. You're quite an artist. In answer to your question, yes, we do have hamburgers and fries in England. But we call French fries "chips". Love, Ringo. P.S.: Forgive the lateness of my reply.
  • Mr. Burns: Thanks for not making fun of my genitalia.

Lisa's Substitute[edit]

"Lisa's Substitute"
The Simpsons episode
Episode no. 32
Directed by Rich Moore
Written by Jon Vitti
Production code 7F19
Original air date April 25, 1991
Chalkboard gag None
Couch gag The Simpsons run in, only to discover that the sofa is missing
Guest appearance(s)

Sam Etic (see below)

Seasons

"Lisa's Substitute" is the 19th episode of the second season of The Simpsons. The episode is about Lisa falling in love with an unconventional substitute teacher.

Synopsis[edit]

{{spoilers}} When Ms. Hoover falls ill, she is replaced substitute teacher Mr. Bergstrom. With his unusual teaching methods, Lisa quickly takes a liking to him; he is the only teacher, and perhaps the only adult, who has ever challenged, respected, and liked her. When Ms. Hoover returns, and Mr. Bergstrom leaves, Lisa is first crushed, then enraged by Homer's callous reaction. Marge forces him to apologize, and to make up for it, he takes her to the train station to see the substitute off. Lisa confesses to Mr. Bergstrom that she will be lost without him. To comfort her, he writes her a note with a message that will always support her. When he is gone, she finds that the note says, "You are Lisa Simpson."

Meanwhile, Bart runs for class president against Martin Prince. With his shock-based campaign, he seems to be the winner, but still loses due to the fact that nobody in the class votes, with the exception of Martin himself and one other student, Wendell.

Sam Etic[edit]

Sam Etic is a psuedonym for actor Dustin Hoffman. The name is a play on the word semitic, alluding to the fact that Hoffman is jewish. Since Hoffman's, and in season 3 Michael Jackson's appearance under psuedonyms, series creator Matt Groening has imposed the rule that guest voices on the show are not permitted to use psuedonyms.

The War of The Simpsons[edit]

"The War of the Simpsons"
The Simpsons episode
Episode no. 34
Directed by Mark Kirkland
Written by John Swartzwelder
Production code 7F20
Original air date May 2, 1991
Chalkboard gag "I will not do anything bad ever again"
Couch gag Homer's breadth knocks everyone else off one by one
Guest appearance(s)

None

Seasons

"War of the Simpsons" is the 20th episode of the second season of The Simpsons.

Synopsis[edit]

{{spoilers}} Marge and Homer throw a party. Homer gets drunk and humiliates himself by leering at Maude Flanders, telling off total strangers, and stumbling over furniture. The next day at church, Marge signs up for a weekend retreat of marriage counseling hosted by Reverand Lovejoy and his wife. Marge recruits grandpa for the weekend to babysit.

Homer finds out that the retreat will be held at Catfish Lake and packs his fishing equiptment. On the way there, he learns of the legendary catfish, General Sherman.

Meanwhile, at home, left with grandpa, Bart and Lisa decide to hold a party. At the lake the next morning Homer tries to sneak away to go fishing. Marge is upset that homer would choose fishing over their marriage. Homer takes a walk instead. On the dock, Homer finds an abandoned fishing pole. The pole yanks him off the peir into a small rowboat, and onto the lake. From their cabin window, Marge watches Homer fish.

Bart and Lisa's party has ended and the house is a mess. Fearing that Grandpa will get in trouble, they frantically clean up the house.

Marge attends the workshops alone while Homer catches his fish. When he returns, Marge tells him their marraige is in trouble if he values fish more than her. To prove that he loves Marge more he lets the fish go and they return to a clean house.

Quotes[edit]

Marge; on Homer: " He's so self-centered, He forgets birthdays, anniversaries, holidays- both religious and secular, he chews with his mouth open, he gambles, he hangs out in a seedy bar with bums and lowlifes, He blows his nose on the towels and puts them back in the middle, He drinks out of the carton. He never changes the baby. When he goes to sleep, he makes chewing noises. When he wakes up, he makes honking noises. Oh and he scratches himself with his keys. I guess that's it. Oh no wait...He kicks me in his sleep and his toenails are too long... and yellow."

Three Men and a Comic Book[edit]

"Three Men and a Comic Book"
The Simpsons episode
Episode no. 35
Directed by Wes M. Archer
Written by Jeff Martin
Production code 7F21
Original air date May 9, 1991
Guest appearance(s)
Seasons

"Three Men and a Comic Book" is the 21th episode of the second season of The Simpsons.

Synopsis[edit]

{{spoilers}}

Bart attends a comic book convention and finds the first issue of Radioactive Man at the Android's Dungeon sale table for $100. He doesn't have enough money. With only $35 he goes to android 's dungeon to buy the comic book.

At the comic book shop, Bart runs into Milhouse and Martin. He talks them into pooling their money and buying the first Radioactive Man Comic. None of them want to let the comic book out of their sights and decide to spend the night together in Bart's treehouse. When Martins gets up in the middle of the night, Bart thinks he plans on stealing the comic book and therefore ties him up.

As a storm approaches, Milhouse tries to tell Bart, but bart has gone crazy and thinks that he plans on stealing the book. When wind blows through the treehouse, it blows the comic book towards the door. Milhouse rolls over the side of the treehouse as bart attacks him over the comic book. When forced to make a choice over his friend or the comic book Bart chooses to pull Milhouse back into the treehouse, as he does the comic book floats out the door and is zapped by lightning.

Blood Feud[edit]

"Blood Feud"
The Simpsons episode
Episode no. 35
Directed by David Silverman
Written by George Meyer
Production code 7F22
Original air date July 11, 1991
Chalkboard gag "I will not sleep through my education"
Couch gag The couch falls through the floor with the family on it
Guest appearance(s)

None

Seasons

"Blood Feud" is the last episode of the second season of The Simpsons. However, according to The Simpsons Archive, "Blood Feud" technically does not belong to any season, as it aired after the formal end of the second season and before the beginning of the third season.

Synopsis[edit]

{{spoilers}} When Mr. Burns falls ill and desperately needs a blood transfusion, Homer discovers Bart has Mr. Burns' blood type, and Homer urges his son to donate, promising that they will be handsomely rewarded. However, Mr. Burns knows nothing of this promise, or even of the Simpsons' desire for a reward, and having received the blood, all he does is send the family a card. Enraged, Homer writes an insulting reply, but Marge convinces him at the last minute not to send it. Homer changes his position. Later the letter goes missing, as Bart has mailed it, still thinking its message is called for.

Homer and Bart's attempts to stop the mail delivery end in failure, and Mr. Burns is furious at the insult and demands that Homer be beaten. Waylon Smithers calls off the beating, however, on the grounds that this action is no way to thank the man who saved Mr. Burns' life. Just as Marge had convinced Homer to refrain from sonly ending the letter, Smithers has a calming influence on Mr. Burns, and the two men decide instead to buy the family a present. The Simpsons receive an antique (Xt'Tapalatakettle) that Bart, the blood donor, likes.

Quotes[edit]

  • Homer: "Don't you know the story of Hercules and the lion?"
    Bart: "Is it a Bible story?"
    Homer: "Yeah, probably. Anyway, once upon a time, there was a big mean lion who got a thorn in his paw. All the village people tried to pull it out, but nobody was strong enough! So, they got Hercules. And Hercules used his mighty strength, and bingo! Anyway, the moral is, the lion was so happy, he gave Hercules this big thing of riches."
    Bart: "How did a lion get rich?"
    Homer: "It was the olden days!"
  • Homer: "Marge, you're my wife, I love you very much, but you're living in a world of make-believe! With flowers and bells and leprechauns and magic frogs with funny little hats."
  • Homer: "Hello, my name is Mr. Burns. I believe you have a letter for me."
    Postal Worker: "Okay, Mr. Burns, uh, what's your first name?"
    Homer: "...I don't know."
  • Mr. Burns: "Hello, young fellow. I haven't forgotten you. Here."
    Bart: "Wow, a crowbar!"
    Lisa: "It's to open the crate, stupid."

Category:Simpsons episodes