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Dragon Ball Z: Budokai series
256px|250px
Cover art for the first Budokai game for the Playstation 2
Developer(s) Dimps
Publisher(s)
Series Dragon Ball
Platform(s) Play Station 2 Gamecube
Release date(s) 2002-2008
Genre(s) Fighting
Mode(s) Single-player
Multiplayer

The Dragon Ball Z: Budokai series are a series of fighting games based on the Dragon Ball media franchise.

Gameplay[edit]

The gameplay of the Budokai series is similar to most fighting games. Two characters from the Dragon Ball franchise fight in a three-dimensional environment until the health meter of one character is depleted, and the opposing player wins. The player is able to initiate a variety of special moves in order to defeat his or her opponent.

History[edit]

Budokai[edit]

Dragon Ball Z: Budokai, released as Dragon Ball Z (ドラゴンボールZ Doragon Bōru Zetto?) in Japan, is a fighting video game released for the PlayStation 2 on December 3, 2002 in North America and for the Nintendo GameCube in North America on October 28, 2003. The game was released in Japan by Bandai on the PlayStation 2 on February 13, 2003, and on the Nintendo GameCube on November 28, 2003. It was developed by Dimps and published by Atari. As the GameCube version was released almost a year after the PlayStation 2 version, the opportunity was taken to improve the graphics using cel-shading.

Budokai 2[edit]

Dragon Ball Z: Budokai 2, released as Dragon Ball Z 2 (ドラゴンボールZ2 Doragon Bōru Zetto Tsū?) in Japan, is a fighting video game based upon the popular anime series, Dragon Ball Z. Budokai 2 is a sequel to Dragon Ball Z: Budokai and was developed by Dimps and published by Atari for the PlayStation 2 and Nintendo GameCube. It was released in North America on December 4, 2003. In 2004 its sequel Dragon Ball Z: Budokai 3 was released. As the GameCube version was released sometime after the PlayStation 2 version (December 15, 2004), the opportunity was taken to improve the graphics slightly and add new costumes. Japan received the game on February 5, 2004 for the PlayStation 2 from Bandai. There was no Japanese version of the GameCube version, although the European GameCube version did feature the Japanese voiceover.

Budokai 2 is a fighting game with cel-shaded graphics to mirror the look and feel of the combat in the series.

Budokai 3[edit]

Dragon Ball Z: Budokai 3, released as Dragon Ball Z 3 (ドラゴンボールZ3 Doragon Bōru Zetto Surī?) in Japan, is a video game based on the popular anime series Dragon Ball Z and was developed by Dimps and published by Atari for the PlayStation 2. It was released on November 16, 2004 in North America through standard release and a Limited Edition release, which included a DVD featuring behind the scenes looks on the game's development. Europe soon saw a release on December 3, 2004. In Fall 2005, Europe obtained a new edition which included character models not available in the North American release as well as a few items and the ability to switch the voices over to Japanese. Japan later saw a release from Bandai on February 10, 2005 and also included the extras that the North American release did not have. Soon after, the Greatest Hits version in North America contained the extra features, including the ability to play with the Japanese voices.

Budokai 3 is a fighting game with cel-shaded graphics to mirror the look and feel of the combat in the series.

Shin Budokai[edit]

Dragon Ball Z: Shin Budokai (ドラゴンボールZ 真武道会 Doragon Bōru Zetto Shin Budôkai?, Dragon Ball Z: True Tournament) is a fighting video game part of the Dragon Ball Z franchise, and was released on March 7 2006. It was developed by Dimps. Scenario story mode is based on the events of the Dragon Ball Z movie Fusion Reborn. The players follow the events of the story in which you choose Goku and friends, including enemy characters, along the way. The choices that you make determine how the story evolves.

Another mode is the Arcade mode, a single player mode that lets you brawl against the CPU in order to fight and gain the Dragon Balls. Next is the Z trial mode, which consists of two different types of play: survival, where you fight against CPU-controlled opponents for as long as you can, and time attack, where you see how fast you can make it through a predetermined set of opponents.

Finally, there’s the Profile Card mode in which the players will have their in-game character profile cards that lists their name and power level. The player can design their own card and customize them with the items from the game's item store.

Shin Budokai: Another Road[edit]

Dragon Ball Z: Shin Budokai - Another Road (known simply as Dragon Ball Z: Shin Budokai 2 (ドラゴンボールZ 真武道会2 Doragon Bōru Zetto Shin Budôkai Tzū?, Dragon Ball Z: True Budokai 2) in Japan and Europe) is the sequel to the best-selling Dragon Ball Z: Shin Budokai fighting game for PlayStation Portable. The story arc is a brand new story telling about Majin Buu being released in Future Trunks' timeline.

Infinite World[edit]

Dragon Ball Z: Infinite World (ドラゴンボールZ インフィニットワールド Doragon Bōru Zetto Infinitto Wārudo?) is a video game based on the anime and manga series Dragon Ball Z and was developed by Dimps and published in North America by Atari for the PlayStation 2 and Europe and Japan by Namco Bandai under the Bandai label. It was released in North America on November 4, 2008, in Japan on December 4, 2008, in Europe on December 5, 2008, and in Australia on May of 2009.[1] It is the last Dragon Ball Z game to be released on the PlayStation 2 console. The game has managed to sell 78,821 copies in its first week. [2] The game was first announced in August of 2008 by Atari's French website. The announcement stated that the game was in development by Dimps and would retain many of the qualities found in the Budokai series. Yet they would include new innovations such as the Dragon Mission mode and a simplified combat system from Burst Limit. It was also promised that the game's roster would include up to forty playable characters, not including transformations and was given a European release date of sometime in December of that year. Included with the announcement, were several screenshots which revealed gameplay of the combat system and four of the mini game from both Saiyan and Android sagas.[3] Shortly after the announcement was posted on Atari's North American page revealing that they would retain the Infinite World title and a release date sometime in November.[4] In September, more information was released stating that the capsule system would be brought back and the audio would include the both English and Japanese voice talent.[5] In October Famitsu posted more screenshots revealing more mini games within the Frieza and Cell sagas.[6] Later that month the game was unveiled at the Tokyo Game Show.[7][8]

Playable Characters[edit]

Character 1 2 3 Shin Shin Another Road Infinite World
Goku Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY
Kid Gohan Green tickY Red XN Green tickY Red XN Red XN Green tickY
Teen Gohan Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY
Great Saiyaman Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Red XN Red XN Green tickY
Vegeta Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY
Future Trunks Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY
Piccolo Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY
Krillin Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY
Tien Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Red XN Red XN Green tickY
Yamcha Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Red XN Red XN Green tickY
Android 16 Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Red XN Red XN Green tickY
Android 17 Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Red XN Red XN Green tickY
Android 18 Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY
Android 19 Green tickY Red XN Red XN Red XN Red XN Red XN
Frieza Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY
Dodoria Green tickY Red XN Red XN Red XN Red XN Red XN
Zarbon Green tickY Red XN Red XN Red XN Red XN Green tickY
Captain Ginyu Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Red XN Red XN Green tickY
Recoome Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Red XN Red XN Green tickY
Cell Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY
Hercule Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Red XN Red XN Green tickY
Nappa Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Red XN Red XN Green tickY
Raditz Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Red XN Red XN Green tickY
Son Goten Red XN Green tickY Green tickY Red XN Red XN Green tickY
Son Gohan Red XN Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY
Kid Trunks Red XN Green tickY Green tickY Red XN Red XN Green tickY
Videl Red XN Green tickY Green tickY Red XN Red XN Green tickY
Supreme Kai Red XN Green tickY Green tickY Red XN Red XN Red XN
Dr. Gero Red XN Green tickY Green tickY Red XN Red XN Green tickY
Dabura Red XN Green tickY Green tickY Red XN Green tickY Green tickY
Majin Buu Red XN Green tickY Green tickY Red XN Green tickY Green tickY
Super Buu Red XN Green tickY Green tickY Red XN Green tickY Green tickY
Kid Buu Red XN Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY
Saibamen Red XN Red XN Green tickY Red XN Red XN Green tickY
Cell Jr. Red XN Red XN Green tickY Red XN Red XN Red XN
Bardock Red XN Red XN Green tickY Red XN Green tickY Green tickY
Cooler Red XN Red XN Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY
Broly Red XN Red XN Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY
Omega Shenron Red XN Red XN Green tickY Red XN Red XN Green tickY
Kid Uub Red XN Red XN Green tickY Red XN Red XN Red XN
Kid Goku Red XN Red XN Green tickY Red XN Red XN Red XN
Janemba Red XN Red XN Red XN Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY
Pikkon Red XN Red XN Red XN Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY
Pan Red XN Red XN Red XN Red XN Red XN Green tickY
Baby Red XN Red XN Red XN Red XN Red XN Green tickY
Super #17 Red XN Red XN Red XN Red XN Red XN Green tickY
Great Saiyaman 2 Red XN Red XN Red XN Red XN Red XN Green tickY


Reception[edit]

Critics gave Budokai 1 mixed or average reviews. The PS2 version received an average score of 68% based on 41 reviews on the review aggregator Game Rankings, and an average score of 67 out of 100 based on 28 reviews on Metacritic.

The GameCube version received an average score of 66% based on 30 reviews on the review aggregator Game Rankings, and an average score of 65 out of 100 based on 16 reviews on Metacritic. Many critics complained about its simple interface and the fact that combos weren't worth the payoff. However, more complex combos were possible due to an oversight in the move canceling feature but were rarely known at the time. These oversights were turned into an important part of the system in the later games and were what high level play tended to revolve around

The PlayStation 2 of Budokai 2 version has an aggregate score of 69% on Game Rankings while the GameCube version has an aggregate score of 66%. GameSpot, who gave the game a 6.7/10 commented that "The improved visuals are nice, and some of the additions made to the fighting system are fun, but Budokai 2 still comes out as an underwhelming sequel."[9]

Budokai 3 was given much higher reviews than its predecessors Dragon Ball Z: Budokai and Dragon Ball Z: Budokai 2. This was often due to how critics felt that the game did more to improve its gameplay rather than just its graphics and presentation. It was given an 8.0/10 by IGN.[citation needed] GameTrailers gave it a 9.1/10.[citation needed] Its fighting and graphics have also been praised, with IGN stating that Budokai 3 was "One of the few instances of cel-shading done right, Budokai 3 also offers a healthy amount of special effects and pyrotechnics and they all look great."[10].

Upon its release, Infinite World received mixed to poor reviews and earned an aggregate score of 48/100 on Metacritic.[11] IGN gave the game a 3.5, calling the gameplay repetitive and making the bold opinionated statement "Do not play Dragon Ball Z: Infinite World.".[12] GamePro gave the game 2 out of 5, stating the game's story mode was too daunting and comparing the game's time rings to those from Superman 64. Yet it was still stated as satisfying as true "hardcore" fan of the show. [13] Dakota Grabowski of GameZone gave the game a 6.1 stating that the game "couldn’t be anymore insipid even if it tried".[14]

However, a few critics were more generous to the game. Gamer 2.0 gave the game a 7 out of 10, stating that "For a PlayStation 2 game, Infinite World looks fine for the most part. It’s not going to be the best looking PS2 game you’ve ever seen, but it captures the DBZ style and looks okay." [15] René Giefing of GamerXP refered to the game as entertaining.[16] Cheat Code Central's project coordinator Matthew Walker gave the game a 4.2 out of 5, stating that the game is "Dragon Ball Z the way you remember it and the way you love it".[17] Jesús Bella Ceacero of 3DJuegos gave a 6.5 out of 10 stating that the game was "a good try to imitate the Burst Limit's combat style".[18] William van Dijk Martín of MeriStation gave the game a six stating that it was a fair adaptation, but the Dragon Mission mode was not enough. Yet he would also state that that the game was a good game that had nothing to do with the third instalments of of the Budokai and Budokai Tenkaichi series.[19] Frank van Aken of Gamer.nl would also give the game a six. Stating that there was an award to give the game, it would be for the storyline within the game. Yet he would express a dislike for the mini-games stating that they were so terrable they took away most of the fun factor.[20]


References[edit]

  1. ^ "Dragon Ball Z: Infinite World". EB Games. Retrieved April 17, 2009. 
  2. ^ "Dragon Ball Z: Infinite World". VG Chartz.com. Retrieved March 30, 2009. 
  3. ^ "Actualités 'DRAGON BALL Z®: INFINITE WORLD' CONCENTRE ET DéCHAîNE LE MEILLEUR DE L'UNIVERS DRAGON BALL Z SUR PLAYSTATION 2." (in French). Atari. August 20, 2008. Retrieved May 20, 2009. 
  4. ^ "News Release 'Dragon Ball Z(R): Infinite World' Brings Best of Dragon Ball Z Universe to Playstation(R)2 Computer Entertainment System". Atari. Retrieved May 20, 2009. 
  5. ^ Glasser, AJ (September 12, 2008). "Hands On: Dragon Ball Z: Infinite World – Gah! Too Many Colons!". Kotaku. Retrieved May 20, 2009. 
  6. ^ "『ドラゴンボールZ インフィニットワールド』あの名シーンを追体験せよ" (in Japanese). Famitsu. October 10, 2008. Retrieved May 20, 2009. 
  7. ^ Fitch, Andrew (October 17, 2008). "Previews The entire DBZ series is available here...for those who like that sort of thing.". 1Up. Retrieved May 20, 2009. 
  8. ^ Ramsay, Randolph (October 10, 2008). "TGS 2008: Drums, Gundams, and Ninjas at Namco Bandai". Gamespot AU. Retrieved May 20, 2009. 
  9. ^ "PlayStation 2 review at GameSpot". 
  10. ^ IGN: Dragon Ball Z Budokai 3 Review
  11. ^ "Dragon Ball Z: Infinite World". Metacritic. Retrieved March 26, 2009. 
  12. ^ Miller, Greg (November 18, 2008). "Dragon Ball Z: Infinite World Review, An instant "must avoid."". IGN. Retrieved December 4, 2008. 
  13. ^ Noble, McKinley (November 04, 2008). "Dragon Ball Z: Infinite World". GamePro. Retrieved December 4, 2008.  Check date values in: |date= (help)
  14. ^ Grabowski, Dakota (November 24, 2008). "Dragon Ball Z: Infinite World Review". GameZone. Retrieved December 4, 2008. 
  15. ^ Selogy, Chris (November 12, 2008). "Dragon Ball Z: Infinite World". Gamer 2.0. Retrieved December 24, 2008. 
  16. ^ Giefing, René (December 31, 2008). "Dragon Ball Z - Infinite World" (in German). GamingXP. Retrieved May 24, 2009. 
  17. ^ Walker, Matthew. "Dragon Ball Z: Infinite World Review, It’s Over 9,000!". Cheat Code Central. Retrieved May 24, 2009. 
  18. ^ Cite error: The named reference name was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  19. ^ "Dragon Ball Z: Infinite World, No tan infinito" (in Spanish). MeriStation. December 5, 2008. Retrieved May 24, 2009.  Unknown parameter |name= ignored (help)
  20. ^ "Gamer.nl: Dragon Ball Z: Infinite World" (in Dutch). Gamer.nl. January 5, 2009. Retrieved May 24, 2009.