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Influences of Alexander Hamilton[edit]

Alexander Hamilton greatly admired the British style of government and monarchy, to the extent that he called it “the best in the world.” [1] [2][3][4] He even proposed an executive that would serve for life, or “during good behavior,”[5][6], but that idea was quickly shot down the next day.[7] Hamilton was influenced by Genevan monarchist Jean-Louis de Lolme’s praise of the English monarchy for being a "sufficiently independent and sufficiently controlled,” and even cited him in Federalist 70 when advocating that the American executive be unitary.[8][9] He “followed De Lolme in worrying that parliament was aggressively stripping the crown of too many of its traditional prerogatives” in Britain and wished to create a comparatively stronger executive in America.[10] Hamilton also adhered to John Locke’s advocacy of the executive’s “respect for constitutional obligations and proper prerogative” in being a strong executive, a concept Hamilton also got from Englishman William Blackstone. [11][12] Montesquieu provided support for Hamilton for the claim that a strong executive was essential for the United States, especially because of its size. [13] Also, Montesquieu’s “vigor” in the executive is the origin of Hamilton’s “energy” in the executive. [14] This energy also derived from Machiavellian and Aristotelian political philosophy. [15][16]

References[edit]

<references>

  1. ^ [Mitchell, Broadus. "Alexander Hamilton, Executive Power and the New Nation." Presidential Studies Quarterly (1987): 329-343, http://www.jstor.org/stable/40574455]
  2. ^ [E Scheuerman, William. "American Kingship? Monarchical Origins of Modern Presidentialism." Latin American Review of Comparative Politics/Revista Latinoamericana de Politica Comparada 7 (2013), http://www.jstor.org/stable/pdfplus/3877061.pdf?&acceptTC=true&jpdConfirm=true]
  3. ^ [Loss, Richard. "Alexander Hamilton and the Modern Presidency: Continuity or Discontinuity?." Presidential Studies Quarterly (1982): 6-25, http://www.jstor.org/stable/pdfplus/27547773.pdf?acceptTC=true&jpdConfirm=true]
  4. ^ [E Scheuerman, William. "American Kingship? Monarchical Origins of Modern Presidentialism." Latin American Review of Comparative Politics/Revista Latinoamericana de Politica Comparada 7 (2013), http://www.jstor.org/stable/pdfplus/10.2307/3877061.pdf]
  5. ^ [Fatovic, Clement. "Reason and Experience in Alexander Hamilton's Science of Politics." Western Political Science Association 2010 Annual Meeting Paper. 2010, http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/666658?Search=yes&resultItemClick=true&searchText=Alexander&searchText=Hamilton%27s&searchText=Influences&searchUri=%2Faction%2FdoBasicSearch%3FQuery%3DAlexander%2BHamilton%2527s%2BInfluences%26amp%3Bacc%3Don%26amp%3Bwc%3Don%26amp%3Bfc%3Doff]
  6. ^ [1]
  7. ^ [2]
  8. ^ [3]
  9. ^ [4]
  10. ^ [5]
  11. ^ [6]
  12. ^ [7]
  13. ^ [8]
  14. ^ [9]
  15. ^ [ http://www.jstor.org/stable/pdfplus/10.2307/1408596.pdf?acceptTC=true]
  16. ^ [10]