User:Edgar181

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About me
I am a medicinal chemist with a PhD in organic chemistry. I have worked in both academic and industrial settings doing teaching, basic research and applied research mostly in the area of drug discovery.

I currently work for a small company that collaborates with academic labs to pursue drug discovery research and to help them secure funding, such as SBIR grants, that would be otherwise unavailable to them. (Contact me if that might interest you.)

I have been actively editing Wikipedia for more than ten years. I try to improve Wikipedia by creating, updating, correcting, organizing, and copyediting articles related to organic chemistry, particularly heterocyclic compounds and natural organic compounds. To get a better idea of my interests, just take a look at some of the articles I have started or this list of the most recent of the ~8000 chemical structure images I have uploaded, or see my contributions.

With my wife and kids, I live in suburban Pennsylvania.

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Nuvola apps edu science.png This user contributes to the Chemicals Wikiproject

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Penicillin-core.png This user contributes to the Pharmacology WikiProject.

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Drop impact
When a liquid drop impacts the surface of a liquid reservoir it can float, bounce, coalesce with the reservoir, or splash. A floating drop remains on the surface for several seconds. Drop bouncing can occur on perturbed liquid surfaces. If the drop is able to rupture the thin film of gas which separates it from the liquid reservoir, it can coalesce. Additionally, higher Weber number drop impacts produce splashing. In the splashing regime, the impacting drop creates a crater in the fluid surface, followed by a crown around the crater. Finally, a central jet, called the "Rayleigh jet" or "Worthington jet", protrudes from the center of the crater. If the impact energy is high enough, the jet rises to the point where it pinches off, sending one or more droplets upward out of the surface.Photograph: José Manuel Suárez