From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
If you would like to leave me a message, please use my talk page.
About me
I am a medicinal chemist with a PhD in organic chemistry. I have worked in both academic and industrial settings doing teaching, basic research and applied research mostly in the area of drug discovery. I have been actively editing Wikipedia for more than ten years. I try to improve Wikipedia by creating, updating, correcting, organizing, and copyediting articles related to organic chemistry, particularly heterocyclic compounds and natural organic compounds. To get a better idea of my interests, just take a look at some of the articles I have started or this gallery of some of the ~5000 chemical structure images I have uploaded, or see my contributions.

As a Wikipedia administrator, the chores that I routinely assist with include speedy deletions, always beginning with the attack articles, and blocking those who abuse their editing privileges.

With my wife and kids, I live in suburban Pennsylvania.

Links I use
Nuvola apps edu science.png This user contributes to the Chemicals Wikiproject

Wikipedia-logo.png This user is a participant in the Chemistry WikiProject.

Penicillin-core.png This user contributes to the Pharmacology WikiProject.

Admin mop.PNG This user is an administrator on the English Wikipedia (verify).



Original Barnstar.png Some nice people have taken the time to give me these pretty things. Thanks.

Picture of the day
General Perspective projection

The General Perspective projection is a map projection used in cartography in which the Earth is depicted as viewed from a finite distance above its surface. If the view precisely faces the center of the Earth, the projection is a vertical perspective projection; otherwise, it is a tilted perspective projection. Here is shown a vertical perspective from an altitude of 35,786 km over (0°, 90°W), corresponding to a view from geostationary orbit. Due to the horizon as seen from the viewpoint position, the projection always shows less than half of the Earth's surface: in this case neither of the North and South Poles is visible.

Map: Strebe, using Geocart
ArchiveMore featured pictures...