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For lightweight transclusion in 2004 Summer Olympics.

 ●  Opening ceremony     Event competitions  ●  Event finals     Exhibition gala  ●  Closing ceremony
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Miami Vice Season 1
150px
DVD cover art
Country of origin  United States
No. of episodes 22
Release
Original network NBC
Original release September 16 1984 – May 10 1985
Season chronology
Next →
Season 2

Season one of Miami Vice premiered on September 16 1984 with the two hour Pilot premiere on NBC. The first season concluded on May 10 1985, after 22 episodes. Season one regular cast members included Don Johnson, Philip Michael Thomas, Saundra Santiago, Gregory Sierra, Michael Talbott, John Diehl, Olivia Brown, and Edward James Olmos. The first season starts off with Ricardo "Rico" Tubbs (Thomas), and NYPD Police Officer, coming down from New York City on a hunt for a drug dealer named Calderone. There in Miami, Tubbs meets James "Sonny" Crockett (Johnson) who assists him on his quest to seek revenge for his brother's death, whom was killed by one of Calderone's henchmen. Following the fourth episode Lt. Lou Rodrigez (Sierra) was shot and killed trying to save Crockett from a sniper. Then in the sixth episode, Lt. Martin "Marty" Castillo (Olmos) joined the Vice crew.

Miami Vice was filmed entirely on location in Miami, Florida, unlike any shows which were filmed in Los Angeles. Recurring cast members included Belinda Montgomery, Martin Ferrero, and Charlie Barnett.

Production[edit]

"The old style was for the composer to sit in production meetings, and someone would say, 'Let's put something here', or 'Let's put something there.' We have managed to bypass all that. The only occasional talk with Michael is when he wants even more music."
Jan Hammer[2]

The first season of Miami Vice was filmed on location in Miami, Florida.[2] The show's crew took up semipermanent residence in the Alexander Hotel for the first season.[2] They later worked out of Greenwich Studios.[3] Episodes were produced at an average cost of $1.3 million, which compared to a typical cop-show episode of $1 million is much higher.[2] The show went to unusual lengths to get the right settings and props for each episode.[2] Music which was an integral part of the show was looked at differently. The show's directors looked for creative ways to use music on the show.[2] Unlike other television shows at the time that used rock music,[2] Miami Vice would buy the rights to original records rather than imitations.[2] The show would spend up to $10,000 per episode for original recordings on artists like Todd Rundgren, U2, and Frankie Goes to Hollywood to name a few.[2] Jan Hammer, the shows's musical composer, would create the rest of the shows musical score. He would use sound stored on his digital computer synthesizer to create the music heard on the show.[2] Jan would work out of his state-of-the-art studio in his 150-year-old home in Brewster, New York composing the score for each episode.[2]

The film crew on the show, was 95% local to the Miami area.[3] Various filming locations on the show included: Downtown Miami, Old Miamarina (Bayside Market Place), Opa Locka Airport, Biscayne Boulevard, Key Biscayne, Florida, Venetian Causeway, Coconut Grove, South Beach, North Miami Beach, St. Croix, McArthur Causeway, Ocean Drive, and Tamiami Trail.[3]

Awards and nominations[edit]

In its first season, Miami Vice was nominated for, at that time, a record 15 Emmy nominations in 1985.[4][2] On September 22 1985 it won four Emmy awards including Oustanding Supporting Actor and Cinematography for a Drama Series.[4] The show was starting to change the way television looks and sounds.[2] The show also won two Grammy Awards for best Pop Instrumental Performance and Instrumental Composition.[5]

Year Result Award Category Recipient(s)
1985 Nominated Emmy Awards Outstanding Writing in a Drama Series Anthony Yerkovich[4]
Winner Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama Series Edward James Olmos[4]
Nominated Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series Don Johnson[4]
Winner Outstanding Film Sound Editing for a Series Bruce Bell, Sound Editor; Jerry Sanford Cohen, Music Editor; Victor B. Lackey, Sound Editor; Ian MacGregor-Scott, Sound Editor; Carl Mahakian, Sound Editor; Chuck Moran, Supervising Sound Editor; John Oettinger, Sound Editor; Bernie Pincus, Sound Editor; Warren Smith, Sound Editor; Bruce Stambler, Sound Editor; Mike Wilhoit, Sound Editor; Paul Wittenberg, ADR Editor; Kyle Wright, Sound Editor[4]
Nominated Outstanding Film Sound Editing for a Series Jerry Sanford Cohen, Music Editor; Scott Hecker, Sound Editor; John A. Larsen, Supervising Sound Editor; Harry B. Miller, III, Sound Editor; Robert Rutledge, Sound Editor; Norto Sepulveda, ADR Editor; Gary Vaughan, Sound Editor; Jay Wilkinson, Sound Editor[4]
Nominated Outstanding Film Editing for a Series Robert A. Daniels, Editor[4]
Nominated Outstanding Film Editing for a Series Michael B. Hoggan[4]
Nominated Outstanding Drama Series Richard Brams, Co-Producer; George E. Crosby, Co-Producer; Michael Mann, Executive Producer; John Nicolella, Supervising Producer; John Nicolella, Producer; Liam O'Brien, Supervising Producer; Mel Swope, Producer; Anthony Yerkovich, Executive Producer[4]
Nominated Outstanding Directing in a Drama Series Lee H. Katzin, Director[4]
Nominated Outstanding Directing in a Drama Series Paul Michael Glaser, Director[4]
Nominated Outstanding Costume Design for a Series Jodie Tillen, Costume Designer[4]
Winner Outstanding Cinematography for a Series Bob Collins, Cinematographer[4]
Nominated Outstanding Cinematography for a Series A.J. "Duke" Callaghan, Cinematographer[4]
Winner Outstanding Art Direction for a Series Jeffrey Howard, Art Director; Robert Lacey[4]
Nominated Outstanding Achievement in Music Composition for a Series (dramatic underscore) Jan Hammer, Composer[4]
Winner Grammy Awards Best Pop Instrumental Performance (Orchestra, Group Or Soloist) - Miami Vice Theme Jan Hammer, artist[5]
Winner Best Instrumental Composition - Miami Vice Theme Jan Hammer, composer[5]

Episodes[edit]

Title Writer(s) Director(s) Airdate Ep. #
"Brother's Keeper/Pilot" Anthony Yerkovich Thomas Carter September 16 1984 1
Guest stars Jimmy Smits, Miguel Pinero, and Mykelti Williamson[6][7]
Music "Miss You" by The Rolling Stones, "Body Talk" by The Deele, "All Night Long (All Night)" by Lionel Richie, "Somebody's Watching Me" by Rockwell, "Girls Just Wanna Have Fun" by Cyndi Lauper, "In The Air Tonight" by Phil Collins[6]
James "Sonny" Crockett is a Miami Vice Squad policeman who has just lost his colleague Eddie Rivera in a car bombing. Crockett was investigating a Colombian drug dealer, called Calderone, when he meets a New York police agent Rafael Tubbs. Since they're having problems approaching Calderone, Crockett and Tubbs are forced to work together. Crockett confronts "Rafael" and discovers that he is Ricardo his brother, that wants to catch Calderone who killed his brother. They decide to work together and Calderone is arrested. He is freed when he pays $2 million bail and escapes. In the end Crockett persuades Tubbs to enter a career in Southern Law Enforcement.
"Heart of Darkness" A. J. Edison John Llewellyn Moxey September 28 1984 2
Guest stars Ed O'Neill, Paul Hecht, and Cheryl Giannin[7]
Music "She's A Beauty" by The Tubes, "Missing You" by John Waite, "Sharp Dressed Man" by ZZ Top, "Going Under" by Devo, "This Masquerade" by George Benson
-
"Cool Runnin'" Joel Surnow Lee H. Katzin October 5 1984 3
Guest stars Larry Riley[7]
Music "Reality Dub" by Linton Kwesi Johnson, "Jammin'" by Bob Marley and The Wailers, "King Tubby" by Augustus Pablo, and "Well of Souls (Feel the Spirit)" by Wailing Souls
-
"Calderone's Return: Part 1 - The Hit List" Joel Surnow Richard Colla October 19 1984 4
Guest stars Jim Zubiena[7]
Music "Crockett's theme" by Jan Hammer, "In The Night" - by Russ Ballard, "Tush" - by ZZ Top, "I'm So Excited" - by The Pointer Sisters
-
"Calderone's Return: Part 2 - Calderone's Demise" Joel Surnow & Alfonse Ruggiero Jr. Paul Michael Glaser October 26 1984 5
Guest stars Miguel Piñero and Phanie Napoli[7]
Music "Voices" by Russ Ballard, "What's Love Got to Do with It" by Tina Turner, "Flashback" by Jan Hammer
-
"One Eyed Jack" Alfonse Ruggiero Jr. Lee H. Katzin November 2 1984 6
Guest stars Dennis Farina, Joe Dallesandro, and Dan Hedaya[7]
Music "New Girl Now" by Honeymoon Suite, "Wonderful Tonight" by Eric Clapton, and "Jump (For My Love)" by The Pointer Sisters
-
"No Exit" Charles R. Leinenweber David Soul November 9 1984 7
Guest stars Bruce Willis[7]
Music "Stay with Me" by Teddy Pendergrass and "I Don't Care Anymore" by Phil Collins
-
"The Great McCarthy" Philip Reed & Joel Surnow Georg Stanford Brown November 16 1984 8
Guest stars None
Music "Some Guys Have All the Luck" by Rod Stewart (played by the party band), "Go Insane" by Lindsey Buckingham, "Self Control" by Laura Branigan (played by the party band), "Creatures of the Night" by Laura Branigan (played by the party band), and "Born to be Wild" by Steppenwolf
-
"Glades" Rex Weiner & Allan Weisberger Stan Lathan November 30 1984 9
Guest stars Keith Szarabajka[7]
Music "We Gotta Get Out of this Place" by The Animals, "I Send a Message" by INXS, and "Girls with Guns" by Tommy Shaw
-
"Give a Little, Take a Little" Chuck Adamson Bobby Roth December 7 1984 10
Guest stars Burt Young and Michael Madsen[7]
Music "Better Be Good to Me" by Tina Turner, "You Want More" by Etta James, and "Today's a Beginning" by Brian Ray
-
"Little Prince" Joel Surnow & Wendy Cozen Allan J. Levi December 14 1984 11
Guest stars None
Music "Relax" by Frankie Goes to Hollywood, "Tiny Demons" by Todd Rundgren, and "Turn Up the Radio" by Autograph
-
"Milk Run" Allison Hock John Nicolella January 4 1985 12
Guest stars Eric Bogosian[7]
Music "Legs" by ZZ Top, "Hit Me with Your Best Shot" by Pat Benatar, and "Kubany Music" by Feliz Cumbe
-
"Golden Triangle: Part I" Maurice Hurley Georg Stanford Brown January 11 1985 13
Guest stars Robin Johnson[7]
Music "Great Balls of Fire" by Dolly Parton
-
"Golden Triangle: Part II" Maurice Hurley & Michael Mann David Anspaugh January 18 1985 14
Guest stars Joan Chen and Keye Luke[7]
Music "Catch the Wind" by The Blues Project, "Poison Ivy" by The Coasters, and "Mr Lee" by The Bobbettes
Lt. Castillo finally finds his his wife, May Ying, only to find out that she also thought that he was dead, and has married again and has a child. He also meets with his old enemy, General Lao Li, who tells Castillo that he has retired from the heroin business and wants to retire in Miami. Castillo doesn't believe him and has the Vice Squad follow Lao Li and his large family's steps. When they find that two of Lao Li's nephews have dealt with drugs, Lao Li becomes enraged and decides to have his nephews killed. Castillo arrests Lao Li, charging him for trying to kill his nephews. May Ying and her family depart from Miami to escape from Lao Li's revenge.
"Smuggler's Blues" Miguel Pinero Paul Michael Glaser February 1 1985 15
Guest stars Glenn Frey[7]
Music "Lunatic Fringe" by Red Rider and "Smuggler's Blues" by Glenn Frey
-
"Rites of Passage" Daniel Pyne David Anspaugh February 8 1985 16
Guest stars Pam Grier and John Turturro[7]
Music "Come to Poppa" by Bob Seger, "Change Your Ways" by Rockwell, and "I Want to Know What Love Is" by Foreigner
-
"The Maze" Michael Eric Stein Tim Zinnemann February 22 1985 17
Guest stars Garcelle Beauvais, Ving Rhames, and Adolfo Quinones[7]
Music "Renegades of Funk" by Afrika Bambaataa, "Living the Book of my Live" by Philip Michael Thomas, and "Tea in the Sahara" by The Police
When a gang of small delinquents kill a police officer, they suddenly become the target of the entire Miami police system. Crockett and Tubbs learn from an informant that the gang is hiding in a derelict low rent building called "the Maze", where they can hide in many places and take the tenants as hostages. Tubbs is sent undercover into the Maze, disguised as a Jamaican musician who just arrived in Miami. When the situation goes wrong, Tubbs is taken hostage with the tenants, including a Haitian brother and sister. At the end, the SWAT team intervenes and the gang members are either killed or arrested.
"Made for Each Other" Joel Surnow & Allan Weisbecker Rob Cohen March 8 1985 18
Guest stars Martin Ferrero, Charlie Barnett, and Mark Linn-Baker[7]
Music "Money (That's What I Want)" by Barrett Strong, "Treat Me Nice" by Elvis Presley, and "Rubberneckin" by Elvis Presley
Zito's house has been destroyed by fire. Until he finds a new house, he moves in with Switek, just the same day that Switek's girlfriend Darlene has moved in. At work, Switek and Zito are investigating John Costelada, a stolen goods trafficker, helped by "Bonzo" Barry the owner of a hardware store. Since Switek and Zito have difficulties in contacting Bonzo Barry, they use the services of petty thiefs and part time informants Izzy Moreno and Noogie Lamont as a way to sell Costelada stolen property and arrest him. After Costelada discovers that Izzy and Noogie are working for the police, Switek and Zito manage to rescue them and arrest Costelada and Bonzo Barry. Meanwhile, living is getting tense; Darlene cannot stand Zito and is replacing Switek's beloved Elvis Presley merchandise.
"The Home Invaders" Chuck Adamson Abel Ferrara March 15 1985 19
Guest stars David Patrick Kelly, Esai Morales, and Sylvia Miles[7]
Music "The Glamorous Life" by Sheila E.
Miami is suffering from a series of home assaulsts. The robbers are notorious for their use of extreme violence. The Vice squad is assigned to help the Robbery Squad, which is lead by Lt. John Malone, Crockett's former boss. Soon Lt. Castillo and Malone start to clash because of Castillo's criticisms on Malone's lack of efficiency. Crockett struggles to deal with this situation over both his current and former bosses. Castillo finds out that all the robbed households have one thing in common: that the owners go to the same hairdresser. Studying the hairdresser, they discover that the car park attendants are in fact the home invaders. After being trapped, the home invaders are killed by the Vice Squad. While celebrating the operation's end, Malone confesses that he has resigned from the police, and Castillo applauds his decision, remarking that a good cop has to know when to hang up his badge.
"Nobody Lives Forever" Edward DiLorenzo Jim Johnston March 29 1985 20
Guest stars Kim Greist[7]
Music "Bad to the Bone" by George Thorogood & The Destroyers, "New Love" by Glenn Frey, "Green Onions" by Booker T & The MG's, and "Heartbeat" by Red 7
-
"Evan" Paul Diamond Rob Cohen May 3 1985 21
Guest stars William Russ[7]
Music "Rhythm of the Heat" by Peter Gabriel, "Biko" by Peter Gabriel, "You Only Left Your Picture" by Fashion, and "Evan's Theme" by Jan Hammer
-
"Lombard" David Assael & Joel Surnow John Nicolella May 10 1985 22
Guest stars Dennis Farina[7]
Music "My Boy Lollipop" by Millie Small, "Wire" by U2
-


  1. ^ "Cover Art, Extras, And Info On Original Music!". www.tvshowsondvd.com. 2004-11-08. Retrieved 2007-08-31. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m Zoglin, Richard (1985-09-16). "Cool Cops, Hot Show". Time Magazine. Time Inc. Retrieved 2007-11-23.  Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; name "coolcops" defined multiple times with different content (see the help page).
  3. ^ a b c "Miami Vice: Seasons 1 & 2". Bravo Production. www.rbravo.com. 2000. Retrieved 2007-11-22. 
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q "Advanced Primetime Awards Search". Academy of Television Arts and Science. www.emmys.tv. Retrieved 2007-11-03. 
  5. ^ a b c "Grammy Award Winners". The Recording Academy. www.grammy.com. Retrieved 2007-11-05. 
  6. ^ a b "Brother's Keeper". Miami Vice. Season 1. Episode 1. 1984-09-16. NBC.  Unknown parameter |city= ignored (help)
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t "Miami Vice: Cast & Details". TV Guide. www.tvguide.com. Retrieved 2007-11-23.