This user helped "Melville Fuller" become a featured article.
This user helped "Howell Edmunds Jackson" become a good article.
This user helped "Wiley Rutledge" become a good article.
This user helped get Raymond A. Jordan listed on the "In the News" section of the main page.
This user helped get "Mazurek v. Armstrong" listed at Did You Know on the main page.
This user helped get "State v. Linkhaw" listed at Did You Know on the main page.
This user helped get "Schneiderman v. United States" listed at Did You Know on the main page.
This user helped get "Briscoe v. Bank of Kentucky" listed at Did You Know on the main page.
This user helped get "Pacific States Telephone & Telegraph Co. v. Oregon" listed at Did You Know on the main page.
This user helped get "Smiley v. Holm" listed at Did You Know on the main page.

User:Extraordinary Writ

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I'm Extraordinary Writ, and I'd like to thank you for visiting. I do my best to be neither cumbersome nor worthy of disfavor.

I'm particularly interested in law, politics, and history, although my content work tends to focus primarily on American legal history, particularly justices of the U.S. Supreme Court. You can see some of the articles that I've worked on above. I also occasionally review content at DYK, GAN, URFA/2020, and FAC. On the more mundane side, I've added a copious number of short descriptions, and I do plenty of old-fashioned wikignoming. The more metapedian side of me enjoys closing and/or contributing to discussions at AfD, MfD, DRV, and RM, initiating proposed deletions, reverting vandalism, reviewing new pages, drafts, and pending changes, and dabbling in a wide variety of other areas that catch my fancy. Regrettably, I'm not infallible, so if you feel I've made a mistake, or if you just want to get in touch, always feel free to leave a message (and/or a trout) on my talk page and I'll try to get back to you. I'm also available via email for sensitive matters, or I can simply be summoned with a ping. Cheers!

More exciting facts about Extraordinary Writ[edit]

  • He's mysterious: "The specific origins of the extraordinary writs are unknown."[1]
  • He's very dangerous: "Applying for an extraordinary writ is a risky avenue to travel down....In considering whether to apply for the writ, lawyer X will be convinced that nothing will arouse judge Y's ire more quickly than having an extraordinary writ issued against her."[2]
  • He's actually a watermelon: "[A case] involving an extraordinary writ is analogous to a watermelon....A petition for an extraordinary writ is comparable to a watermelon because a watermelon is not a fruit. According to the National Watermelon Promotion Board, a watermelon is a vegetable. Thus, just as a watermelon seems like a fruit, a petition for an extraordinary writ seems like a procedure for an interlocutory appeal. In reality, however, the watermelon is a vegetable, not a fruit, and a petition for an extraordinary writ is a vehicle for obtaining immediate review of certain actions by the court below, not a true interlocutory appeal of the underlying case."[3]

Kind words[edit]

American law and its people

Cornflower blue Yogo sapphire.jpg

Thank you for quality articles around U.S. legal cases and people involved, such as Melville Fuller, Howell Edmunds Jackson, Raymond A. Jordan, Schneiderman v. United States, beginning with Mazurek v. Armstrong, for gnoming, for "I do my best to be neither cumbersome nor worthy of disfavor", - you are an awesome Wikipedian!

Original Barnstar.png The Original Barnstar
Thank you for your extensive explanation of the consensus while you closed the ISBN move discussion. PhotographyEdits (talk) 20:30, 24 April 2022 (UTC)
Barnstar of Diligence Hires.png The Barnstar of Diligence
For getting Wall-to-wall coverage, which in my opinion is the most difficult Challenge or close to it. Congratulations! — Bilorv (talk) 17:48, 11 February 2022 (UTC)
Congratulations to Extraordinary Writ, whose fantastic contributions to Wikipedia have earned a Triple Crown. Your work is apprecaited. Damien Linnane (talk) 21:35, 19 October 2021 (UTC)
Wiki medal.jpg The Featured Article Medal
By the authority vested in me by myself it gives me great pleasure to present you with this special, very exclusive award created just for we few, we happy few, this band of brothers, who have shed sweat, tears and probably blood, in order to be able to proudly claim "I too have taken an article to Featured status". Gog the Mild (talk) 19:26, 17 October 2021 (UTC)
Original Barnstar Hires.png The Original Barnstar
Thank you for telling me about Twinkle, was very helpful!! Ruy (talk) 08:57, 5 August 2021 (UTC)
Editors Barnstar Hires.png The Editor's Barnstar
For the clarity and accuracy of your contributions, your classic writing style is very much admired and appreciated! Grand'mere Eugene (talk) 03:06, 16 June 2021 (UTC)
Barnstar of Diligence Hires.png The Barnstar of Diligence
For your works at AFD, they are very much noticed and notated. Thank you for your contributions Celestina007 (talk) 01:45, 5 June 2021 (UTC)
Tireless Contributor Barnstar Hires.gif The Tireless Contributor Barnstar
Doing boring, repetitive tasks is never fun, but someone's gotta do it. Thanks! Thanoscar21talkcontributions 17:54, 5 January 2021 (UTC)

Miscellany[edit]

>Low pending changes backlog: 4 pages according to DatBot as of 21:15, 25 June 2022 (UTC)

References

  1. ^ Hanus, Jerome J. (1968). "Certiorari and Policy-Making in English History". American Journal of Legal History. 12 (2): 71. doi:10.2307/844382. ISSN 0002-9319.
  2. ^ Benham, Samuel K. (2010). "Judicial Purgatory: Strategies for Lawyers". Drake Law Review. 58 (2): 597.
  3. ^ Sloan, Amy E. (Fall 2005). "Appellate Fruit Salad and Other Concepts: A Short Course in Appellate Process". University of Baltimore Law Review. 35 (1): 51, 57–58.